Description

Ocular emergencies can present major problems for vets. Signs can be dramatic, manifesting as apparent instant blindness, severe trauma from fights or road accidents, or the acute discoloration of the white of the eye to red or blue. The vet needs to identify quickly what the problem is so that the immediate palliative measures are appropriate and do not make matters worse.

A major feature of this book is its unique problem-oriented approach, not used in the standard ophthalmology texts. This is complemented by a section arranged on a more anatomical basis, with appropriate cross-referencing, so that access to the right section is made as easy (and quick!) as possible. The book emphasises differential diagnoses and treatment options, showing clearly where the case needs referral to a specialist for resolution. Extra material on background pathogenesis and treatment rationale is provided in boxes. The material needed for the actual emergency will be made readily accessible, using bullet points and easy-to-follow line diagrams.

David Williams is based in the UK. He has recently completed a PhD and is building on an international reputation in both ophthalmology and exotic medicine. His US co-author, Kathie Barrie, is current President of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmology and a practising vet; she has ensured that the text is of equal relevance to US practice.

Key Features

  • Written at an appropriate level for the non-specialist veterinarian, making it a practical guide for managing small animal ophthalmic emergencies.
  • Provides instant access to the correct diagnosis and management of ocular emergencies with clear, easy-to-use diagnostic flowcharts.
  • Highlights key information and important issues in tinted boxes throughout the text, making clinical facts accessible to busy practitioners.

Table of Contents

FOREWORD

INTRODUCTORY CHAPTERS

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

1.1 How to use this book

1.2 Performing an ocular examination in an emergency situation

1.3 Recording observations made in an ocular emergency

1.4 Equipment and aids required to deal with the ocular emergency

1.5 Some preliminary notes on treatment of ocular infections

1.6 Analgesia in ocular emergencies

1.7 Dealing with ocular emergencies in horses and ruminants

1.7.1 Techniques facilitating large animal ocular examination

1.7.2 Techniques facilitating large animal ocular therapeutics

CHAPTER 2: A problem orientated approach

2.1: The red eye

2.2 The painful eye

2.3 The white eye

2.4 The suddenly blind eye

2.5 Ocular lesions in systemic disease

DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF OCULAR EMERGENCIES

CHAPTER 3: ADNEXA AND ORBIT

3.1: Lid laceration

3.2 Conjunctivitis

3.3 Conjunctival foreign body

3.4 Acute keratoconjunctivitis sicca

3.5 Orbital cellulitis

3.6 Orbital space occupying lesion

CHAPTER 4: GLOBE

4.1: Blunt trauma to the globe

4.2: Globe prolapse

4.3: Penetrating globe injury

CHAPTER 5: CORNEA

5.1: Corneal ulceration

5.1.1: Is an ulcer present? - the use of ophthalmic stains

5.1.2: Three key questions regarding any corneal ulcer

5.1.2.1 Ulcer depth

5.1.2.2 Ulcer healing

5.1.2.3 The cause of the ulcer

5.2 Dealing with different ulcers

5.2.1 The simple healing superficial ulcer

5.2.2 The recurrent or persistent non-healing superficial ulcer

5.2.3 Ulceration secondary to bullous keratopathy

5.2.4 Partial thickness stromal ulceration

5.2.5 Near-penetrating ulcers, descemetocoeles and penetrating ulcers

5.2.6.1 The melting ulcer: diagnosis

5.2.6.2 The melting ulcer: diagnosis

5.3

Details

No. of pages:
128
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2002
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
Electronic ISBN:
9780702038075
Print ISBN:
9780750635608

About the authors

About the editor