Handbook of Recycled Concrete and Demolition Waste - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857096821, 9780857096906

Handbook of Recycled Concrete and Demolition Waste

1st Edition

Editors: Fernando Pacheco-Torgal Vivian Tam João Labrincha Yining Ding Jorge de Brito
eBook ISBN: 9780857096906
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857096821
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 30th September 2013
Page Count: 672
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Table of Contents

Contributor contact details

Woodhead Publishing Series in Civil and Structural Engineering

Chapter 1: Introduction to the recycling of construction and demolition waste (CDW)

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 EU 70% recycling target for 2020

1.3 Outline of the book

Part I: Managing construction and demolition waste

Chapter 2: Improving waste management plans in construction projects

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Existing waste management planning (WMP) measures and methods of control

2.3 Assessing the effectiveness of WMP methodology

2.4 Conclusions

2.5 Acknowledgement

Chapter 3: Methods for estimating construction and demolition (C&D) waste

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Definitions and documents

3.3 Sources of construction and demolition (C&D) waste

3.4 Composition of C&D waste

3.5 Quantification of C&D waste studies

3.6 Estimate procedures and case studies

3.7 Future trends

3.8 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 4: Waste management plants and technology for recycling construction and demolition (C&D) waste: state-of-the-art and future challenges

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Types of waste management plants

4.3 Environmental and health aspects

4.4 Construction and demolition (C&D) waste management plants in the waste chain: a systems perspective

4.5 Conclusions and future trends

4.6 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 5: Multi-criteria decision-making methods for the optimal location of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) recycling facilities

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Decision-making tools: site selection

5.3 Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA): an overview

5.4 MCA-based methodology for site selection of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) recycling facilities

5.5 A case study: Cantabria, northern Spain

5.3 Geographical areas defined in the case study in Cantabria, northern Spain.

5.6 Sensitivity analysis of the ranking of C&DW facility location alternatives to the criteria weightings with different MCA methods.

5.7 I nfluence of uncertainty on the ranking of C&DW facility location alternatives with different MCA methods.

5.6 Conclusions

Acknowledgements

Chapter 6: The economics of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management facilities

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Drivers and constraints for the development of the recycling sector

6.3 Cost factors of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) recycling

6.4 Cost factors of the end-of-waste criteria implementation

6.5 Future trends

6.6 Acknowledgement

Part II: Processing and properties of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste

Chapter 7: Conventional demolition versus deconstruction techniques in managing construction and demolition waste (CDW)

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Technological aspects of demolition

7.3 Technological aspects of deconstruction

7.4 Demolition versus deconstruction: economic analysis

7.5 Demolition versus deconstruction: environmental analysis

7.6 Conclusions

7.7 Future trends

Chapter 8: Demolition techniques and production of construction and demolition waste (CDW) for recycling

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 End-of-life scenarios for buildings

8.3 Planning demolition

8.4 Demolition technologies

8.5 Top-down and other demolition methods

8.6 Types and handling of demolition waste

8.7 Conclusions

Chapter 9: Preparation of concrete aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW)

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Technological aspects of concrete recycling

9.3 Uses of recycled construction and demolition waste (CDW) materials

9.4 Economic aspects of recycled aggregate for concrete

9.5 Environmental aspects of recycled aggregate for concrete

9.6 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 10: Separation processes to improve the quality of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA)

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Recycled concrete aggregates (RCA): properties and mortar content

10.3 Beneficiation of RCAs: innovative methods

10.4 Effects of RCA beneficiation on the mechanical properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC)

10.5 Economic and environmental assessment of RCA beneficiation

Chapter 11: Quality control of recycled aggregates (RAs) from construction and demolition waste (CDW)

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Composition and classification of recycled aggregates (RAs)

11.3 Quality criteria for the use of RAs

11.4 Guidelines for measuring quality parameters of RAs

11.5 Parameters affecting compliance with quality criteria

11.6 Conclusions

Chapter 12: Properties of concrete with recycled aggregates

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Properties of fresh concrete using recycled aggregates

12.3 Properties of hardened concrete using recycled aggregates

12.4 Summary: using recycled aggregates successfully in concrete

Chapter 13: Strength and durability of concrete using recycled aggregates (RAs)

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction: using recycled aggregates (RAs) in concrete

13.2 Factors affecting the durability of concrete

13.3 Strength and durability of concrete using RAs

13.4 Conclusions

Part III: Applications of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste

Chapter 14: Recycled aggregates (RAs) for roads

Abstract:

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Physico-mechanical characterisation of recycled aggregates (RAs) for roads

14.3 Chemical characterisation of RAs for road construction

14.4 RAs from construction and demolition waste (CDW) in pavement sections

14.5 Assessing the use of RAs in practice

14.6 Environmental performance

14.7 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 15: Recycled aggregates (RAs) for asphalt materials

Abstract

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Volumetric properties

15.3 Rutting

15.4 Stiffness

15.5 Fatigue

15.6 Stripping and durability

15.7 Conclusions

15.8 Acknowledgements

Chapter 16: Recycled asphalt (RA) for pavements

Abstract:

16.1 Introduction

16.2 The recycling process for recycled asphalt (RA)

16.3 Assessment of the properties of RA

16.4 Designing a pavement mix containing RA

16.5 Testing the mechanical properties of designed mixtures

16.6 Future trends

Chapter 17: The suitability of concrete using recycled aggregates (RAs) for high-performance concrete (HPC)

Abstract:

17.1 Introduction

17.2 High performance concrete (HPC) with recycled aggregates (RAs): an overview

17.3 Applications of HPC using RAs

Chapter 18: Use of construction and demolition waste (CDW) for alkali-activated or geopolymer cements

18.1 Introduction

18.2 The development of alkali-activated or geopolymer cements

18.3 Mechanisms of alkali activation and properties of alkali-activated cements

18.4 Applications of alkali-activated or geopolymer cements

18.5 Precursors for alkali-activated or geopolymer cements

18.6 The development of alkali-activated or geopolymer cements based on construction and demolition waste

18.7 Conclusions

Part IV: Environmental issues affecting recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste

Chapter 19: Removing gypsum from construction and demolition waste (C&DW)

Abstract

19.1 Introduction

19.2 Definition and utilization of gypsum

19.3 The problem of contamination of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) by gypsum

19.4 Current methods of removing gypsum from C&DW

19.5 Minimum contamination levels for various uses of recovered aggregate

19.6 Current research and future needs

Chapter 20: Recycling asbestos-containing material (ACM) from construction and demolition waste (CDW)

Abstract:

20.1 Introduction

20.2 Classification of asbestos minerals, health effects and use of asbestos as a building material

20.3 The reclamation, disposal and recycling of asbestos-containing material (ACM)

20.4 Recycling cement asbestos for the production of concrete

20.5 Recycling cement asbestos in geopolymers

20.6 Future trends

Chapter 21: Remediation processes for wood treated with organic and/or inorganic preservatives

Abstract:

21.1 Introduction

21.2 Physical remediation processes for treated wood wastes

21.3 Bioremediation of treated wood wastes

21.4 Chemical remediation processes for treated wood wastes

21.5 Future trends

Chapter 22: An effective approach to utilize recycled aggregates (RAs) from alkali-silica reaction (ASR) affected Portland cement concrete

Abstract:

22.1 Introduction

22.2 Scope of the study

22.3 Materials and test methods

22.4 Results and discussion

22.5 Field implications

22.6 Recommendations

Chapter 23: Life-cycle assessment (LCA) of concrete with recycled aggregates (RAs)

Abstract:

23.1 Introduction

23.2 Properties of concrete with recycled concrete aggregates (RCA)

23.3 Life-cycle assessment (LCA) of concrete: allocation issues

23.4 A case study: LCA of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) production compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC) production

23.5 LCA of low-grade applications of RCA

23.6 LCA of waste management systems

23.7 Conclusions and future trends

23.8 Acknowledgement

Chapter 24: Assessing the potential environmental hazards of concrete made using recycled aggregates (RAs)

Abstract:

24.1 Introduction

24.2 Methods for assessing the potential hazard of construction materials and wastes

24.3 Pollutant emissions from concrete materials

24.4 Recycled aggregates (RAs): properties and intrinsic potential hazards

24.5 Concrete materials containing RAs: properties and potential hazards

24.6 Conclusions

Index


Description

The civil engineering sector accounts for a significant percentage of global material and energy consumption and is a major contributor of waste material. The ability to recycle and reuse concrete and demolition waste is critical to reducing environmental impacts in meeting national, regional and global environmental targets. Handbook of recycled concrete and demolition waste summarises key recent research in achieving these goals.

Part one considers techniques for managing construction and demolition waste, including waste management plans, ways of estimating levels of waste, the types and optimal location of waste recycling plants and the economics of managing construction and demolition waste. Part two reviews key steps in handling construction and demolition waste. It begins with a comparison between conventional demolition and construction techniques before going on to discuss the preparation, refinement and quality control of concrete aggregates produced from waste. It concludes by assessing the mechanical properties, strength and durability of concrete made using recycled aggregates. Part three includes examples of the use of recycled aggregates in applications such as roads, pavements, high-performance concrete and alkali-activated or geopolymer cements. Finally, the book discusses environmental and safety issues such as the removal of gypsum, asbestos and alkali-silica reaction (ASR) concrete, as well as life-cycle analysis of concrete with recycled aggregates.

Handbook of recycled concrete and demolition waste is a standard reference for all those involved in the civil engineering sector, as well as academic researchers in the field.

Key Features

  • Summarises key recent research in recycling and reusing concrete and demolition waste to reduce environmental impacts and meet national, regional and global environmental targets
  • Considers techniques for managing construction and demolition waste, including waste management plans, ways of estimating levels of waste, the types and optimal location of waste recycling plants
  • Reviews key steps in handling construction and demolition waste

Readership

Civil engineers; Architects and researchers who are looking at environment issues or recycling of aggregates in civil engineering


Details

No. of pages:
672
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2013
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857096906
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857096821

About the Editors

Fernando Pacheco-Torgal Editor

Fernando Pacheco-Torgal is a Senior Researcher in the C-TAC Research Centre at the University of Minho, Portugal. He has authored almost 300 publications, including 96 in ISI Web of Science-WoS and 92 on Scopus. Having received 798 citations in WoS (h-index=15) and 1125 citations on Scopus (h-index=18). He has a SCI Platinum h=30 the highest in the field of civil in Portugal. He has also been the Lead Editor of 14 international books, with more than 500 contributors from 52 countries in the five continents.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Minho

Vivian Tam Editor

Vivian Tam is Senior Lecturer in Quality Surveying in the School of Engineering and Construction Management at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. She is the author of over 200 papers.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Western Sydney, Australia

João Labrincha Editor

João Labrincha is Associate Professor in the Materials and Ceramics Engineering Department of the University of Aveiro, Portugal, and member of the CICECO research unit. He has registered 22 patent applications, and has published over 170 papers.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Aveiro, Portugal

Yining Ding Editor

Yining Ding is Professor in the Institute of Structural Engineering at Dalian University of Technology, China. He has published over 100 papers in three languages.

Affiliations and Expertise

Dalian University of Technology in China

Jorge de Brito Editor

Jorge de Brito is Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georesources at the Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal. He was Head of the ICIST Research Centre from 2009 to 2012.

Affiliations and Expertise

Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal