Handbook of Natural Antimicrobials for Food Safety and Quality - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782420347, 9781782420422

Handbook of Natural Antimicrobials for Food Safety and Quality

1st Edition

Editors: M Taylor
eBook ISBN: 9781782420422
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782420347
Paperback ISBN: 9780081013991
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 6th November 2014
Page Count: 442
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Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • Preface
  • 1. The use of natural antimicrobials in food: an overview
    • 1.1. Introduction
    • 1.2. Types of natural antimicrobials: animal sources
    • 1.3. Types of natural antimicrobials: plant sources
    • 1.4. Types of natural antimicrobials: microbial sources
    • 1.5. Challenges to application of natural antimicrobials to foods
    • 1.6. Application of natural antimicrobials
    • 1.7. Conclusions
  • Part One. Types
    • 2. Plant extracts as antimicrobials in food products: types
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Herbs, spices, and plant extracts as antimicrobials
      • 2.3. Essential oils
      • 2.4. Plant extracts in combination with minerals
      • 2.5. Conclusion
    • 3. Plant extracts as antimicrobials in food products: mechanisms of action, extraction methods, and applications
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Mechanisms of action of plant extracts
      • 3.3. Plant extracts and antibiotic resistance
      • 3.4. Extraction methods to maximize antimicrobial properties
      • 3.5. Response of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to plant extracts
      • 3.6. Applications of plant extracts in food products
      • 3.7. Conclusion
    • 4. Bacteriophages as antimicrobials in food products: history, biology and application
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Research into bacteriophages
      • 4.3. Biology of bacteriophages
      • 4.4. Bacteriophages as biocontrol agents in food
      • 4.5. The use of phage endolysins as biocontrol agents in food
      • 4.6. Combining bacteriophages with other preservation techniques to enhance food safety
    • 5. Bacteriophages as antimicrobials in food products: applications against particular pathogens
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Bacteriophages to control Gram-negative food-borne pathogens
      • 5.3. Bacteriophages to control Gram-positive food-borne pathogens
      • 5.4. Conclusion and future trends
    • 6. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as antimicrobials in food products: types and mechanisms of action
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Characteristics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB)
      • 6.3. Carbohydrate metabolism in LAB
      • 6.4. Effects of culture preparation and storage techniques on LAB
      • 6.5. Antimicrobial compounds produced by LAB: organic acids, diacetyl, and hydrogen peroxide
      • 6.6. Antimicrobial compounds produced by LAB: bacteriocins
      • 6.7. Conclusions
    • 7. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as antimicrobials in food products: analytical methods and applications
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Screening lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for antimicrobial activity
      • 7.3. Regulatory framework governing the use of LAB in food
      • 7.4. Methods for using LAB as biopreservatives in food
      • 7.5. Use of LAB in the biopreservation of particular food products and as a biosanitizer
      • 7.6. Conclusions
    • 8. Chitosan as an antimicrobial in food products
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Overview of antimicrobial activity of chitosan
      • 8.3. Mechanism of action
      • 8.4. Effects of molecular structure
      • 8.5. Effects of environmental conditions
      • 8.6. Current applications and future trends
  • Part Two. Processing
    • 9. Evaluating natural antimicrobials for use in food products
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. The advantages of using antimicrobials in food preservation
      • 9.3. The use of natural antimicrobials in food preservation
      • 9.4. Combining antimicrobials with other preservation techniques
      • 9.5. Factors affecting the biocidal activity of natural antimicrobials
      • 9.6. The regulation of natural antimicrobials
      • 9.7. Conclusion
    • 10. Physical and chemical methods for food preservation using natural antimicrobials
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Physical application of natural antimicrobials
      • 10.3. Chemical application of natural antimicrobials
      • 10.4. Biological application of natural antimicrobials
      • 10.5. Commercial natural antimicrobials
      • 10.6. Conclusion and future trends
    • 11. Nanostructured and nanoencapsulated natural antimicrobials for use in food products
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Natural food antimicrobials
      • 11.3. Nanostructures for antimicrobial delivery
      • 11.4. Methods for characterization of nanostructures
      • 11.5. Food applications of nanostructured antimicrobial systems
      • 11.6. Conclusions and future trends
    • 12. Modelling the effects of natural antimicrobials as food preservatives
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Antimicrobial susceptibility assessment
      • 12.3. Mathematical modelling in food preservation
      • 12.4. Types of models
      • 12.5. Model development
      • 12.6. Modelling the effects of natural antimicrobial agents
      • 12.7. Conclusion and future trends
  • Part Three. Using natural antimicrobials in particularfoods
    • 13. Using natural antimicrobials to enhance the safety and quality of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables: types of antimicrobials
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Fresh and processed fruits and vegetables: advances and challenges
      • 13.3. Natural antimicrobials used in assuring the safety and quality of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables: antimicrobials from plant essential oils
      • 13.4. Antimicrobials from plants: aldehydes and methyl jasmonate
      • 13.5. Antimicrobials from plants: phenolic compounds and isothiocyanates
      • 13.6. Chitosan is not from plant origin
      • 13.7. Natural antimicrobials of microbial origin: lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bacteriocins
      • 13.8. Conclusion and future trends
    • 14. Using natural antimicrobials to enhance the safety and quality of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables: application techniques and quality issues
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Techniques for applying natural antimicrobials to fruits and vegetables: key issues
      • 14.3. Encapsulation of natural antimicrobials
      • 14.4. Edible films and coatings enriched with natural antimicrobials
      • 14.5. Antioxidant properties of natural antimicrobials
      • 14.6. Plant antimicrobials as flavoring compounds
      • 14.7. Conclusion and future trends
    • 15. Using natural antimicrobials to enhance the safety and quality of milk
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Enhancing the safety and quality of milk-based beverages using natural antimicrobials: milk
      • 15.3. Enhancing the safety and quality of infant milk formulas using natural antimicrobials
      • 15.4. Enhancing the safety and quality of egg–milk beverages using natural antimicrobials
      • 15.5. Conclusion and future trends
    • 16. Using natural antimicrobials to enhance the safety and quality of fruit- and vegetable-based beverages
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Enhancing the safety and quality of fruit- and vegetable-based beverages using natural antimicrobials
      • 16.3. Melon and watermelon juices
      • 16.4. Orange and orange-based juices
      • 16.5. Grape juices
      • 16.6. Apple and pear juices
      • 16.7. Dark fruit juices
      • 16.8. Tomato juices
      • 16.9. Other vegetable beverages
      • 16.10. Conclusion and future trends
    • 17. Using natural antimicrobials to enhance the safety and quality of alcoholic and other beverages
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Alcoholic beverages
      • 17.3. Wine
      • 17.4. Beer
      • 17.5. Apple cider
      • 17.6. Hot drinks
      • 17.7. Conclusion and future trends
    • 18. Using natural antimicrobials to enhance the safety and quality of poultry
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Food safety and its role in food quality
      • 18.3. Pre-harvest use of natural antimicrobials
      • 18.4. Antimicrobials for use on poultry products
      • 18.5. Conclusion and future trends
  • Index

Description

Natural additives are increasingly favoured over synthetic ones as methods of ensuring food safety and long shelf-life. The antimicrobial properties of both plant-based antimicrobials such as essential oils and proteins such as bacteriocins are used in, for example, edible preservative films, in food packaging and in combination with synthetic preservatives for maximum efficacy. New developments in delivery technology such as nanoencapsulation also increase the potential of natural antimicrobials for widespread use in industry. Part one introduces the different types of natural antimicrobials for food applications. Part two covers methods of application, and part three looks at determining the effectiveness of natural antimicrobials in food. Part four focuses on enhancing quality and safety, and includes chapters on specific food products.

Key Features

  • Reviews different types of antimicrobials used in food safety and quality
  • Covers how antimicrobials are created to be used in different foods
  • Examines how the antimicrobials are used in foods to enhance the safety and quality

Readership

R&D managers in the food industry, food industry professionals responsible for product safety, product development professionals working with clean-label or ‘natural’ products and academic researchers with an interest in this area.


Details

No. of pages:
442
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782420422
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782420347
Paperback ISBN:
9780081013991

Reviews

"...focuses on new developments to enhance the quality, safety, applications, and effectiveness of natural antimicrobials in food." --IFIS


About the Editors

M Taylor Editor

Dr Matt Taylor, Texas A&M University, USA

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor of Food Microbiology, Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University, USA