Handbook of Microbial Nanotechnology

Handbook of Microbial Nanotechnology

1st Edition - March 13, 2022

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  • Editor: Chaudhery Hussain
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128234266
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128235935

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Description

Handbook of Microbial Nanotechnology is a collection of the most recent scientific advancements in the fundamental application of microbial nanotechnology across various sectors. This comprehensive handbook highlights the vast subject areas of microbial nanotechnology and its potential applications in food, pharmacology, water, environmental remediation, etc. This book will serve as an excellent reference handbook for researchers and students in the food sciences, materials sciences, biotechnology, microbiology and in the pharmaceutical fields.Microbial nanotechnology is taking part in creating development and innovation in various sectors. Despite the participation of microbial nanotechnology in modern development, there are some hindrances. The lack of information, the possibility of adverse impacts on the environment, human health, safety and sustainability are still a challenge. This handbook addresses these challenges.

Key Features

  • Offers up-to-date, scientific information on the integration of microbiology and nanotechnology
  • Explores how nanotechnology can improve the detection of trace chemical contaminants, viruses and bacteria in food and other industry applications
  • Provides readers with a fundamental understanding of microbial nanotechnology and its challenges
  • Includes real-time applications with case studies to illustrate how microbial nanotechnology influences modern sciences and technologies

Readership

A broad range of scientists in food, biological, and material sciences. Chemists, manufacturing scientists and engineers, pharmacists, biologists who are involved and interested in the future frontiers of microbial nanotechnology. Advanced students; grad students

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • List of contributors
  • About the editor
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1. Microbial nanotechnology–based approaches for wound healing and infection control
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Wound healing and infection control: an insight
  • 1.3 Use of nanotechnology in wound healing and infection control
  • 1.4 Microbial synthesis of nanomaterials
  • 1.5 Methods of microbial-based green synthesis of nanomaterials
  • 1.6 Microbially synthesized nanomaterials for wound healing and infection control
  • 1.7 Antibacterial mechanisms of metal-based nanoparticles
  • 1.8 Conclusions and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Cancer therapeutics with microbial nanotechnology-based approaches
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction of cancer, current state, treatments, and limitations
  • 2.2 Introduction of nanoparticles, advantages, properties, synthesis pathways, and the emerging use of microbial synthesis
  • 2.3 Synthesis pathways and general characteristics
  • 2.4 Direct therapeutic mechanisms (nanoparticles as therapy)
  • 2.5 Indirect therapeutic mechanism
  • 2.6 Current challenges and prospects in clinical translation
  • 2.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Nanotechnological interventions for the detection of pathogens through surface marker recognition
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Biomarkers exposed on the surface of microorganisms
  • 3.3 Conventional methods
  • 3.4 Switching from conventional to nanotechnological approach
  • 3.5 Conclusion and future prospects
  • Acknowledgement
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 4. An overview of microbial calcite nanoparticle generation in self-healing concrete: its potential, advantages, and limitations as a green building material
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Constituents of microbial concrete
  • 4.3 Implantation of healing agents and precipitation process inside the matrix
  • 4.4 Performance and enhancement of bioconcrete properties
  • 4.5 Potential of bioconcrete in the construction industry
  • 4.6 Advantages and disadvantages
  • 4.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Nanobiosensors for detection of bacteria: an overview of fiber-optics and Raman spectroscopy based biosensors
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Biosensors for pathogen detection
  • 5.3 Optical biosensors and methods
  • 5.4 Nanomaterial enhanced biosensors
  • 5.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 6. Utilization of flow cytometry in nanomaterial/bionanomaterial detection
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Flow cytometer: principles and instrumentation
  • 6.3 Flow cytometry and its applications in research
  • 6.4 Nanotechnology and flow cytometry
  • 6.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Utilization of Raman spectroscopy in nanomaterial/bionanomaterial detection
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Raman: principle and instrumentation
  • 7.3 Detecting nanoparticles in cells using Raman spectroscopy
  • 7.4 Detecting nanoparticles in cells using Raman spectroscopy
  • 7.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Nanotechnology based Pathogen identification through surface marker identification
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Nanotechnological advancement in pathogen identification
  • 8.3 Trends and challenges
  • 8.4 Conclusion
  • Abbreviation
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Microalgae nanotechnology and drug development
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Microalgae production of metallic nanoparticles
  • 9.3 Microalgae production of biomolecules for pharmaceutical applications
  • 9.4 Microalgae as facilitating technologies
  • 9.5 Summary and conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Regulations and risk assessment of microbial green nanotechnology
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Microbial green synthesis of nanomaterials
  • 10.3 Life cycle assessment of nanomaterials: environmental and health risk assessment
  • 10.4 Influencing factors in toxicity of green nanomaterials
  • 10.5 Challenges on safety assessment
  • 10.6 Global regulatory aspects on microbial green nanotechnology
  • 10.7 Conclusion and future trends/Green Nano Policy recommendations
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflicts of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Nanoparticles as antibacterial agent for dental restorative materials and their antibacterial activity evaluation
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Nanoparticles as fillers in restorative materials
  • 11.3 Surface morphology and roughness of restorative materials with different filler sizes
  • 11.4 A study of surface roughness relation with bacterial accumulation
  • 11.5 Nanoparticles as antibacterial agents and their mechanisms
  • 11.6 Antibacterial evaluation technique
  • 11.7 Microscopy cellular structure of the microbes
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Green synthesis of nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Synthesis of nanomaterials
  • 12.3 Green chemistry
  • 12.4 Methods of synthesizing nanomaterials employing green routes
  • 12.5 Synthesis of nanomaterials with plants
  • 12.6 Synthesis of nanomaterials through microbes
  • 12.7 Microwave
  • 12.8 Sonochemical method
  • 12.9 Synthesis from waste
  • 12.10 Synthesis of nanomaterials by using solvents
  • 12.11 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Antimicrobial nanocoating for food industry
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Coating
  • 13.3 Widely used nanocoating antimicrobial materials
  • 13.4 Some potential convertible materials for obtaining nanomaterials
  • 13.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Antiviral potential of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Use of nanotechnology for antiviral therapeutics
  • 14.3 Bioengineering of silver nanomaterials using biological resources
  • 14.4 Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles for antiviral therapeutics: A mechanistic approach
  • 14.5 Conclusions and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Microbial nanotechnology in food industry: antimicrobial packaging
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Drawbacks of existing packaging materials
  • 15.3 Role of nano research in the food industry
  • 15.4 Food packaging
  • 15.5 Shelf life or preservation of food material
  • 15.6 Toxicological and safety aspects of nanotechnology in food packaging
  • 15.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Microbial bio-based polymer nanocomposite for food industry applications
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Nanotechnology applications in food industry
  • 16.3 Application of polymer nanocomposites in food industry
  • 16.4 Bio-based polymer applications in food industry (nanocomposite)
  • 16.5 Polyhydroxybutyrate
  • 16.6 Bacterial cellulose
  • 16.7 Polylactic acid
  • 16.8 Curdlan, gellan gum, k-carrageenan, and xanthan gum nanocomposite
  • 16.9 Microbial biopolymeric nanocomposites’ role in the food packaging
  • 16.10 Safety and regulation issues of NPs
  • 16.11 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Pathogen identification through surface marker recognition methods
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Components of nanoparticles involved in pathogen detection
  • 17.3 Biosensors
  • 17.4 Pathogen identification through surface marker recognition
  • 17.5 Future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Microbial nanotechnology in cancer therapy
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Microbial nanotechnology
  • 18.3 Microbial nanotechnology in immunotherapy
  • 18.4 Microbial nanoformulations
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Green synthesized nanomaterials for greener environment
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Environmental pollutants: chemical and molecular classification
  • 19.3 Environmental pollutants: effect on human health
  • 19.4 Limitation of conventional remediation techniques
  • 19.5 Nano-bioremediation: a modern approach of using green synthesized nanomaterials in environmental remediation
  • 19.6 Mechanism of nano-remediation
  • 19.7 Conclusion
  • 19.8 Future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Enzymes incorporated nanotechnology for wastewater treatment
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Enzymes
  • 20.3 Types of enzymes used for wastewater treatment
  • 20.4 Enzyme integrated nanoparticle for wastewater treatment
  • 20.5 Delivery of enzyme by using nanoparticle for wastewater treatment
  • 20.6 Applications of enzyme-based nanomaterials
  • 20.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Microbes incorporated nanomaterials for water purification
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Microbial synthesis of silver nanoparticles
  • 21.3 Mechanism of microbially synthesized nanoparticles
  • 21.4 Endophytic microbes—the biofactories of nanoparticles synthesis
  • 21.5 Applications of nanomaterials on wastewater treatment/water purification
  • 21.6 Use of microbially manufactured silver nanoparticles for water purification
  • 21.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 22. Green nanotechnology for the environment
  • Abstract
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Goals of green technology
  • 22.3 Current scientific and technological advancements
  • 22.4 Energy and environmental technology
  • 22.5 Nano-enhanced green technologies
  • 22.6 Nanomaterials in chemical industry
  • 22.7 Impact on environmental filtration and remediation
  • 22.8 Green nanotechnology for eco-friendly agriculture
  • 22.9 Nanotechnology and air pollution
  • 22.10 Nanotechnology for pollution prevention
  • 22.11 Toxicity, risk assessment, and management
  • 22.12 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 23. Atomic force microscopy as multifunctional microbial imaging and characterization platform
  • Abstract
  • 23.1 Antibiotic resistance
  • 23.2 Multifunctional microbial identification and imaging
  • 23.3 Atomic force microscopy, multifunctional tool for biological sample characterization
  • 23.4 Challenges
  • Acknowledgment
  • Credit: authorship contribution statement
  • References
  • Chapter 24. Role of microbial nanotechnology in energy devices
  • Abstract
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Microbial nanotechnology in energy sources
  • 24.3 Microbial nanotechnology in energy conversion
  • 24.4 Microbial nanotechnology in energy distribution
  • 24.5 Microbial nanotechnology in energy usage or consumption
  • 24.6 Microbial nanotechnology in energy storage
  • 24.7 Biofuels
  • 24.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 588
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: March 13, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128234266
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128235935

About the Editor

Chaudhery Hussain

Chaudhery Hussain
Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain, PhD is an Adjunct Professor, Academic Advisor and Lab Director in the Department of Chemistry & Environmental Sciences at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, New Jersey, USA. His research is focused on Application of Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials, in environment and analytical chemistry and various Industries. Dr. Hussain is the author of numerous papers in peer-reviewed journals as well as prolific author and editor of several (around 100) scientific monographs and books in his research areas.

Affiliations and Expertise

Adjunct Professor and Director of Chemistry and EVSc Labs, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, NJ, USA

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