Handbook of Hygiene Control in the Food Industry - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780081001554, 9780081001974

Handbook of Hygiene Control in the Food Industry

2nd Edition

Editors: H. L. M. Lelieveld John Holah Domagoj Gabric
eBook ISBN: 9780081001974
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081001554
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 16th June 2016
Page Count: 756
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Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Foreword
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Chapter 1. The Starting Point: What Is Food Hygiene?
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 What Is Food Hygiene?
    • 1.3 Historical Developments
    • 1.4 Concept of Food Safety and Its Definition
    • 1.5 Management of Food Safety and Hygiene: A Shared Responsibility
    • 1.6 Food Hygiene Today and Outlook
    • References
  • Part I: Management of Hazards and Risks
    • Chapter 2. Consumer Perceptions of Risks From Food
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Risk Perceptions of Consumers Are Not the Same as Technical Risk Assessments
      • 2.3 Risk Perception and Barriers to Effective Risk Communication
      • 2.4 Developing an Effective Risk Communication Strategy
      • 2.5 Application of Combined Consumer Behavior: Food Safety Studies
      • 2.6 The Need for More Intensive Cooperation Between Natural and Social Scientists
      • 2.7 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 3. HACCP
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 HACCP and FSMS
      • 3.3 HACCP in Practice: Development, Implementation, and Maintenance
      • 3.4 HACCP and the Law: Meeting Legal Requirements and Responsibilities
      • 3.5 Benefits and Opportunities: Using HACCP Techniques for Improvement
      • 3.6 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 4. The Range of Microbial Risks in Food Processing
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction: The Risk of Microbial Foodborne Disease
      • 4.2 Microorganisms Responsible for Foodborne Diseases
      • 4.3 Related Products
      • 4.4 The Control of Food Safety
      • 4.5 Using Food Safety Objectives to Manage Microbial Risks
      • 4.6 Cooperation in the Supply Chain to Achieve Food Safety Objectives
      • 4.7 Quantitative Methods
      • 4.8 Quantification of Recontamination
      • 4.9 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 5. Biofilm Risks
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Biofilm Formation and Detection
      • 5.2 Pathogens in Biofilms
      • 5.3 Persistent and Nonpersistent Microbial Contamination in Food Processing
      • 5.4 Prevention of Biofilm Formation and Biofilm Removal
      • 5.5 Future Trends and Advice in Biofilm Control for the Food Industry
      • References
    • Chapter 6. Aerosols as a Contamination Risk
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Important Factors
      • 6.3 Aerosol Generation
      • 6.4 Aerosol Dispersal
      • 6.5 Ways to Reduce the Risk from Airborne Contamination
      • 6.6 Future Trends
      • 6.7 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • References
    • Chapter 7. Chemical Hazards
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Risk Management of Chemical Hazards: Principles
      • 7.3 Inherent Toxicants
      • 7.4 Contaminants of Natural Origin
      • 7.5 Primary Production
      • 7.6 Contaminants Arising During Food Manufacture
      • 7.7 Issues Associated with Criminally Related Activities
      • 7.8 Discussion
      • References
    • Chapter 8. Food Safety Management: State of the Art
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Food Safety Definition and Concept
      • 8.3 Management of Food Safety in Food Industry Operations
      • 8.4 Change Management
      • 8.5 Management Commitment, Human Resource Management, and Organizational Culture
      • 8.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgment
      • References
    • Chapter 9. Risk Assessment in Hygiene Management
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Quality Management and Risk Assessment
      • 9.3 Examples of Risk Assessments
      • 9.4 Future Trends
      • 9.5 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Managing Risks from Allergenic Residues
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Food Allergy and Product Safety
      • 10.3 Management of Food Allergy Risks
      • 10.4 Role of Allergen Detection and Other Considerations
      • 10.5 Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 11. Managing Contamination Risks From Packaging Materials
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Interactions Between FP, Foods, and the Environment
      • 11.3 Main Contamination Hazards in Food Due to FP
      • 11.4 Regulatory Aspects
      • 11.5 FP Hygiene and Safety Management Systems
      • 11.6 Conclusions and Trends
      • List of Acronyms
      • Websites of Interest
      • References
    • Chapter 12. Improving the Control of Insects in Food Processing
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 The Grain Bulk as an Ecosystem
      • 12.3 Moisture Migration in the Grain Bulk
      • 12.4 Dry- and Wet-Grain Heating
      • 12.5 Insects in Stored Products
      • 12.6 Inspection and Monitoring
      • 12.7 Physical and Chemical Control Measures
      • 12.8 Reducing the Time of Phosphine Treatment by Using Speedbox
      • 12.9 Future Trends
      • Bibliography
    • Chapter 13. Managing the Risks of Food Intended for Consumption by Religious Consumers
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Food Safety and Hygiene in the Context of Religion
      • 13.3 Risks
      • 13.4 Risk Management
      • 13.5 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • Further Reading
    • Chapter 14. Food Hygiene and Food Workers: From Complacency to Compliance
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Food Hygiene Training: Limitations of a Knowledge-Provision Approach
      • 14.3 Employing a Psychological Perspective to Understand Food Hygiene Behavior
      • 14.4 The Role of Workplace Environment and Culture in Complacency and Compliance
      • 14.5 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 15. Hygiene Requirements in Food Service
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Hazard Control Plan
      • 15.3 Barriers
      • 15.4 Harborage
      • 15.5 Cross-Contamination Vectors
      • 15.6 Cleaning and Disinfection
      • References
    • Chapter 16. The Use of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Components of SOPs and SOP Programs
      • 16.3 SOP Requirements Under Regulatory Programs
      • 16.4 Common Problems in Implementing SOPs Effectively
      • 16.5 Sources of Further Information
      • References
  • Part II: Plant and Equipment
    • Part II. Plant and Equipment
    • Chapter 17. Global Overview of Legislation, Statutes, Standards, and Guidelines Impacting Hygienic Design
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Leading International Standards Organizations
      • 17.3 Leading Regional Standards Organizations
      • 17.4 Leading National Governmental Organizations
      • 17.5 Leading Industry Organizations
      • 17.6 Leading Hygienic Design Standards Organizations
      • 17.7 Conclusion
      • 17.8 Summary
      • Further Reading
    • Chapter 18. The Hygienic Design of Closed Equipment
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction: The Hygienic Performance of Closed Equipment
      • 18.2 The Importance of Flow Parameters in Hygienic Performance
      • 18.3 Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Optimizing Hygiene
      • 18.4 Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics in Improved Hygienic Design
      • 18.5 Future Trends
      • 18.6 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • References
    • Chapter 19. Hygienic Design of Heating Equipment
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Heat Exchanger Design
      • 19.3 Developments in Heat Exchanger Design
      • 19.4 Future Trends
      • 19.5 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 20. Hygienic Design of Air-Blast Freezing Systems
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Industrial Air-Blast Freezing Systems
      • 20.3 Types of Air-Blast Freezers
      • 20.4 Legislation, Standards, and Guidelines Covering Hygienic Design
      • 20.5 Materials of Construction
      • 20.6 Basic Hygienic Design Requirements
      • 20.7 Hygienic Design of Freezer Equipment Components
      • 20.8 Defrosting
      • 20.9 Cleaning
      • 20.10 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 21. Hygienic Design of Equipment in Handling Dry Materials
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction: Principles of Hygienic Design
      • 21.2 Dry Particulate Materials
      • 21.3 Cleaning
      • 21.4 Some Design Principles
      • 21.5 Typical Equipment in the Dry Material Handling Area
      • 21.6 Improving Hygiene in Processing Powders
      • References
    • Chapter 22. Hygienic Design of Packaging Equipment
      • Abstract
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Definitions
      • 22.3 Choice of a Packaging Machine
      • 22.4 Hygienic Design of the Packaging Machine
      • 22.5 Conclusion
      • Sources
    • Chapter 23. Improving the Hygienic Design of Valves
      • Abstract
      • 23.1 Introduction
      • 23.2 Valve Types
      • 23.3 Hygienic Aspects of Valve Design
      • 23.4 Current Guidelines and Standards
      • Further Reading
    • Chapter 24. Improving the Hygienic Design of Pipes
      • Abstract
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Piping Design: Good Practice
      • 24.3 Materials of Construction
      • 24.4 Product Recovery
      • 24.5 Microbial Growth in Piping Systems
      • 24.6 Future Plant Design
      • References
    • Chapter 25. The Hygienic Design of Pumps
      • Abstract
      • 25.1 Introduction: Types of Pump Used in Food Processing
      • 25.2 Components Used in Pumps
      • 25.3 Cleanability, Surface Finish, and Other Requirements
      • 25.4 Materials and Motor Design
      • 25.5 Summary
      • References
    • Chapter 26. Hygienic Design of Fish Processing Equipment
      • Abstract
      • 26.1 Introduction
      • 26.2 Steps and Aspects of Fish Processing
      • 26.3 Equipment
      • 26.4 Conclusion
      • 26.5 Sources of Further Information and Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 27. Conveyors Used in the Food Industry
      • Abstract
      • 27.1 Introduction
      • 27.2 General Design Rules
      • 27.3 Materials of Construction
      • 27.4 Hygienic Design for Conveyor Belts and Accessories Thereto
      • 27.5 Belting Typology
      • 27.6 General Profile of Food-Grade Conveyor Belts
      • 27.7 Cleanability
      • 27.8 Service/Maintenance
      • 27.9 Scrapers
      • 27.10 Mechanical Joints
      • 27.11 Bearing Surfaces
      • 27.12 Belt Lifters and Swivel-Mounted Rollers
      • 27.13 Drum Motors
      • References
    • Chapter 28. Improving Hygiene in Food Transportation
      • Abstract
      • 28.1 Introduction
      • 28.2 Legislation
      • 28.3 Implementation of the Current Legislation
      • 28.4 Examples
      • 28.5 Temperature Management
      • 28.6 Avoiding Cross-Contamination
      • 28.7 Future Trends
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 29. Specific Requirements for Equipment for Aseptic Processing
      • Abstract
      • 29.1 Introduction
      • 29.2 Specific Requirements for Disinfection
      • 29.3 Specific Equipment Requirements to Prevent Recontamination
      • 29.4 Aseptic Packaging
      • 29.5 Package Integrity
      • References
    • Chapter 30. Novel Materials of Construction in the Food Industry
      • Abstract
      • 30.1 Introduction
      • 30.2 Antimicrobial Materials
      • 30.3 Biopassive Polymer Materials/Coating
      • 30.4 Coatings with Biopassive and Bioactive Properties
      • 30.5 Ceramics
      • 30.6 Conclusions
      • References
  • Part III: Cleaning and Disinfection
    • Part III. Cleaning and Disinfection
    • Chapter 31. Cleaning of Surfaces
      • Abstract
      • 31.1 Introduction
      • 31.2 Food-contact Surfaces
      • 31.3 Cleaning Efficiency
      • 31.4 Investments
      • References
    • Chapter 32. Improving the Cleaning of Heat Exchangers
      • Abstract
      • 32.1 Introduction
      • 32.2 Processing Effects on Fouling
      • 32.3 Cleaning Food Fouling
      • 32.4 Novel Approaches to Cleaning
      • 32.5 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 33. Ozone for Food Decontamination: Theory and Applications
      • Abstract
      • 33.1 Introduction
      • 33.2 Ozone
      • 33.3 Microbial Inactivation Mechanism
      • 33.4 Applications of Ozone
      • 33.5 Applications of Ozone on Foods at Industrial Scales
      • 33.6 Health and Safety Considerations
      • 33.7 Limitations
      • 33.8 Conclusion and Future Trends
      • 33.9 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • References
    • Chapter 34. Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water for Food and Equipment Decontamination
      • Abstract
      • 34.1 Introduction
      • 34.2 EO Water Generation Mechanism
      • 34.3 Mechanism of Cleaning and Disinfecting Effect of Using EO Water
      • 34.4 Applications of EO Water on Food Products
      • 34.5 Applications of EO Water on Food-Processing Equipment
      • 34.6 Limitations of EO Water Technology
      • 34.7 Conclusions and Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 35. Cleaning and Disinfection in Dry Food Processing Facilities
      • Abstract
      • 35.1 Introduction
      • 35.2 Cleaning of Process Equipment and Process Areas Handling Dry Food Products: Objectives
      • 35.3 Wet Cleaning of Dry Food-Processing Equipment
      • 35.4 Wet Cleaning of Dry Material Handling Areas in the Food Factory
      • 35.5 Dry Cleaning of Dry Food-Processing Equipment
      • 35.6 Dry Cleaning of Dry Material Handling Areas in the Food Factory
      • 35.7 Hygiene Practices During Dry Cleaning of Dry Food-Processing Equipment
      • 35.8 Brushing
      • 35.9 Vacuum Cleaning
      • 35.10 Scraping
      • 35.11 Sweeping
      • 35.12 Blowing With Compressed Air
      • 35.13 Cleaning With Solid Carbon Dioxide (Dry Ice Blasting)
      • 35.14 Cleaning With Dry Food Products
      • 35.15 Dry Cleaning by Means of Plastic or Rubber Components
      • 35.16 Dry Cleaning by Applying Pigs
      • 35.17 Dry Disinfection Methods
      • 35.18 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 36. Enzymatic Cleaning in Food Processing
      • Abstract
      • 36.1 Introduction
      • 36.2 Enzyme-Based Cleaning Procedures
      • 36.3 Laboratory Trials of Enzyme-Based Cleaning
      • 36.4 Field Trials
      • 36.5 Risks
      • 36.6 Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 37. Testing the Effectiveness of Disinfectants and Sanitizers
      • Abstract
      • 37.1 Introduction
      • 37.2 Types of Biocidal Products
      • 37.3 Factors Affecting the Efficacy of Biocides/Biocidal Products/Sanitizers
      • 37.4 Criteria for Testing Biocidal Action
      • 37.5 Tests for Disinfectants and Sanitizers
      • 37.6 Test Limitations and Scope for Improvement
      • 37.7 Future Trends
      • 37.8 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • References
    • Chapter 38. Validating Cleaning Systems
      • Abstract
      • 38.1 Introduction
      • 38.2 Cleaning Validation Process
      • 38.3 Methods for Validation and Verification of Cleaning
      • 38.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 39. Bacterial Resistance to Biocides
      • Abstract
      • 39.1 Introduction: Pathogen Resistance to Biocides in the Food Industry and Why It Is so Important to Avoid It
      • 39.2 Cleaning and Disinfection
      • 39.3 Biocide Target Sites
      • 39.4 Factors Influencing Biocide Efficiency
      • 39.5 Resistance in Bacteria
      • 39.6 Biocide Antibiotic Cross-Resistance and Coresistance
      • 39.7 Conclusions and Recommendations
      • 39.8 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • References
    • Chapter 40. Traceability of Cleaning Agents and Disinfectants
      • Abstract
      • 40.1 Introduction
      • 40.2 Detergents and Disinfectants
      • 40.3 General Issues in Tracing of Hygiene Solutions and Hygiene Products
      • 40.4 The Challenge of Analyzing Detergents and Disinfectants
      • 40.5 Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 41. Selection, Use, and Maintenance of Manual Cleaning Equipment
      • Abstract
      • 41.1 Introduction
      • 41.2 Selection of Cleaning Equipment
      • 41.3 Cleaning Equipment Use
      • 41.4 Cleaning Equipment Maintenance
      • 41.5 Likely Future Trends
      • 41.6 Further Information and Advice
      • References
  • Part IV: Monitoring and Verification
    • Part IV. Monitoring and Verification
    • Chapter 42. Testing Surface Cleanability in Food Processing
      • Abstract
      • 42.1 Introduction
      • 42.2 Microorganisms
      • 42.3 Hygienic Surfaces
      • 42.4 Organic Soil
      • 42.5 Future Trends
      • 42.6 Sources of Further Information and Advice
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 43. Monitoring of Fouling, Cleaning, and Disinfection in Closed Processing Plants
      • Abstract
      • 43.1 Introduction
      • 43.2 Background
      • 43.3 Current Approaches to Monitoring
      • 43.4 Laboratory-/Pilot-Scale Studies
      • 43.5 Industry Requirements and Potential Benefits
      • 43.6 Future Trends
      • 43.7 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 44. Surface Sampling and the Detection of Contamination
      • Abstract
      • 44.1 Introduction
      • 44.2 Managing Cleaning and the Role of Surface Sampling
      • 44.3 Nonmicrobiological Surface Sampling
      • 44.4 Microbiological Surface Sampling
      • 44.5 Surface Sampling and Cleanliness: Guidelines and Integrated Protocols
      • 44.6 Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 45. Air Sampling
      • Abstract
      • 45.1 Introduction
      • 45.2 Microbial Viability in the Air
      • 45.3 Why, How, and What to Sample
      • 45.4 Bioaerosols and Bioaerosol Samplers
      • 45.5 Air Sampling Methods
      • 45.6 Bioaerosol Assay Methods
      • 45.7 Interpretation of Bioaerosol Results
      • 45.8 Future Trends
      • References
    • Chapter 46. Improving Hygiene Auditing
      • Abstract
      • 46.1 Introduction
      • 46.2 Why Have a Hygiene Improvement Audit in the First Place?
      • 46.3 Auditing and the Hierarchy of a Controlled System
      • 46.4 Purposes of an Auditing System
      • 46.5 Designing a System for Improvement Audits
      • 46.6 Performing the Audit
      • References
  • Index

Description

Handbook of Hygiene Control in the Food Industry, Second Edition, continues to be an authoritative reference for anyone who needs hands-on practical information to improve best practices in food safety and quality.

The book is written by leaders in the field who understand the complex issues of control surrounding food industry design, operations, and processes, contamination management methods, route analysis processing, allergenic residues, pest management, and more.

Professionals and students will find a comprehensive account of risk analysis and management solutions they can use to minimize risks and hazards plus tactics and best practices for creating a safe food supply, farm to fork.

Key Features

  • Presents the latest research and development in the field of hygiene, offering a broad range of the microbiological risks associated with food processing
  • Provides practical hygiene related solutions in food facilities to minimize foodborne pathogens and decrease the occurrence of foodborne disease
  • Includes the latest information on biofilm formation and detection for prevention and control of pathogens as well as pathogen resistance

Readership

Food industry professionals, food scientists, food safety professionals/managers, food microbiologists, food engineers, public health/government officials


Details

No. of pages:
756
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081001974
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081001554

Ratings and Reviews


About the Editors

H. L. M. Lelieveld Editor

Huub Lelieveld is Co-founder and President of the Global Harmonization Initiative, Member of the Executive Committee and a Past-President of EFFoST (the European Federation of Food Science and Technology), Founder and Past-President of EHEDG (the European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group). He is a fellow of IAFoST (the International Academy of Food Science and Technology), a fellow of IFT (the Institute of Food Technologists), served on the Governing Council of IUFoST (the International Union of Food Science and Technology) and has been Chair of the Nonthermal Processing Division and the International Division of IFT. At Unilever, he was responsible for hygienic processing and plant design and novel processing technologies. He is lead editor of “Hygiene in food processing”, the “Handbook of hygiene control in the food industry” and “Food preservation by pulsed electric fields: From research to application”. He is co-editor of several other books, including “Ensuring Global Food Safety: Exploring Global Harmonization”, “Hygienic design of food factories”, ”Food safety management: a practical guide for the food industry” and “High Pressure Processing of Food – Principles, Technology and Applications”. He wrote chapters for many books and encyclopaedia, wrote hundreds of scientific articles and articles for magazines and presented hundreds of papers, globally. He is a member of many editorial boards of books, journals and magazines. He initiated “People, planet, prosperity and the food chain” in short P3FC, an organisation of which the sole objective is to remind the food industry as frequently as possible that besides caring for shareholders, they also share responsibilities for planet and society. He has been awarded doctor honoris causa at the National University of Food Technologies (NUFT) in Kiev, Ukraine.

Affiliations and Expertise

Global Harmonization Initiative (GHI), Vienna, Austria; European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group (EHEDG), Rotterdam, The Netherlands The Global Harmonization Initiative (GHI) is registered in Vienna, Austria; the European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group (EHEDG) in Rotterdam, the Netherlands; the European Federation of Food Science and Technology (EFFoST) in Wageningen, The Netherlands, International Union of Food Science and Technology (IUFoST) in Ontario, Canada.

John Holah Editor

Prof. Dr. John Holah is an applied microbiologist who has focused on the prevention of microbial, chemical, and foreign body contamination of food during manufacture and retail distribution, on a worldwide basis. He is currently Technical Director of Holchem Laboratories (UK), Visiting Professor in Food Safety at Cardiff Metropolitan University and was previously Head of Food Hygiene at Campden BRI.

Affiliations and Expertise

Holchem Laboratories, Ltd., Lancashire, UK

Domagoj Gabric Editor

Dr. Domagoj Gabrić received his M.Sc. (2006) in food engineering from the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology (Croatia). He earned his PhD (2011) in Food Science and Technology within European (EU-FP6) Project. He held a postdoc position at National College of Veterinary Medicine, Food Science and Engineering (ONIRIS) in Nantes, France.

In 2014 he established a “FoodSciTech” Consultancy based in The Netherlands, advising on food science and technology and providing hands-on execution services. He focuses on innovative, emerging technologies in both liquid and solid food processing as well as in hygienic design of such processing.

Dr Gabrić is the author and/or co-author of many research journal articles and book chapters in the broad area of food science and technologies.

Affiliations and Expertise

FoodSciTech, Culemborg, Provincie Gelderland, The Netherlands