Handbook of Herbs and Spices

Handbook of Herbs and Spices

1st Edition - September 21, 2012
  • Editor: K V Peter
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780081016176
  • eBook ISBN: 9780857095688

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Description

Herbs and spices are among the most versatile ingredients in food processing, and alongside their sustained popularity as flavourants and colourants they are increasingly being used for their natural preservative and potential health-promoting properties. An authoritative new edition in two volumes, Handbook of herbs and spices provides a comprehensive guide to the properties, production and application of a wide variety of commercially-significant herbs and spices.Volume 2 begins with a discussion of such issues as the medicinal uses of herbs and spices and their sustainable production. Herbs and spices as natural antimicrobials in foods and the effect of their natural antioxidants on the shelf life of food are explored, before the book goes on to look in depth at individual herbs and spices, ranging from ajowan to tamarind. Each chapter provides detailed coverage of a single herb or spice, and begins by considering origins, chemical composition and classification. The cultivation, production and processing of the specific herb or spice is then discussed in detail, followed by analysis of the main uses, functional properties and toxicity.With its distinguished editor and international team of expert contributors, the two volumes of the new edition of Handbook of herbs and spices are an essential reference for manufacturers using herbs and spices in their products. They also provide valuable information for nutritionists and academic researchers.

Key Features

  • Provides a comprehensive guide to the properties, production and application of a wide variety of commercially-significant herbs and spices
  • Begins with a discussion of such issues as the medicinal uses of herbs and spices and their sustainable production
  • Explores herbs and spices as natural antimicrobials in foods and the effect of their natural antioxidants on the shelf life of food

Readership

Manufacturers, food technologists and flavor/sensory specialists.

Table of Contents

  • Contributor contact details

    Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition

    Volume 2

    Chapter 1: Introduction to herbs and spices: medicinal uses and sustainable production

    Abstract:

    1.1 Introduction

    1.2 Main uses of herbs and spices

    1.3 Safety and efficacy issues: a phytochemical perspective

    1.4 The structure of this book

    Chapter 2: Herbs, spices and their active components as natural antimicrobials in foods

    Abstract:

    2.1 Introduction: a need for ‘new’ preservatives

    2.2 Chemical composition of flavouring substances produced from herbs and spices

    2.3 In vitro antimicrobial activities of herbs, spices and their components

    2.4 In situ antimicrobial activities of herbs, spices and their components

    2.5 Mode of antimicrobial action

    2.6 Legislation and labelling

    2.7 Future trends

    Chapter 3: The effect of natural antioxidants in herbs and spices on food shelf-life

    Abstract:

    3.1 Introduction

    3.2 Reactions of spice antioxidants with natural food components

    3.3 Main changes in herb and spice antioxidants under different conditions

    3.4 Future trends and conclusions

    Chapter 4: Health benefits of herbs and spices

    Abstract:

    4.1 Introduction

    4.2 Cancer preventive properties of herbs and spices

    4.3 Other health effects of herbs and spices

    4.4 Safety and toxicity

    4.5 Future trends

    Chapter 5: Methods of analysis of herbs and spices

    Abstract:

    5.1 Introduction

    5.2 General analytical methods

    5.3 Extraction techniques: determining essential oil content of plant material

    5.4 Identifying the physical properties of essential oils

    5.5 Estimation of oleoresin in spices

    5.6 Antioxidant potential of plant extracts

    5.7 Estimation of fibre

    Chapter 6: Ajowan

    Abstract:

    6.1 Introduction

    6.2 Production and trade

    6.3 Main uses in food and cosmetics

    6.4 Functional properties

    6.5 Quality issues

    Chapter 7: Aniseed

    Abstract:

    7.1 Introduction

    7.2 Production and cultivation

    7.3 Main uses in food processing

    7.4 Functional properties

    7.5 Quality and regulatory issues

    Chapter 8: Asafoetida

    Abstract:

    8.1 Introduction

    8.2 Chemical composition

    8.3 Cultivation and processing

    8.4 Quality issues

    8.5 Main uses of asafoetida

    Chapter 9: Allspice

    Abstract:

    9.1 Introduction

    9.2 Chemical composition

    9.3 Cultivation

    9.4 Main uses of allspice

    9.5 Functional properties

    9.6 Quality issues and adulteration

    Chapter 10: Capers and caperberries

    Abstract:

    10.1 Introduction

    10.2 Chemical composition

    10.3 Cultivation of capers and caperberries

    10.4 Pests and diseases

    10.5 Main cultivars and world production and trade

    10.6 Post-harvest technology and uses in food processing

    10.7 Functional properties and health benefits

    10.8 Quality issues and future trends

    Chapter 11: Caraway

    Abstract:

    11.1 Introduction

    11.2 Production and international trade

    11.3 Main uses in food

    11.4 Nutritional and functional benefits

    11.5 Toxicity

    11.6 Quality specifications

    Chapter 12: Celery

    Abstract:

    12.1 Introduction

    12.2 Production and international trade

    12.3 Main products and uses in food

    12.4 Nutritional value and functional properties

    12.5 Quality specifications

    Chapter 13: Chervil

    Abstract:

    13.1 Introduction

    13.2 Production and cultivation of chervil

    13.3 Main uses of chervil

    Chapter 14: Fennel and fennel seed

    Abstract:

    14.1 Introduction and description

    14.2 Chemical composition

    14.3 International trade, production and post-harvest processing

    14.4 Main uses of fennel in food

    14.5 Functional properties of fennel

    14.6 Toxicity and allergenicity

    14.7 Quality issues

    Chapter 15: Galangal

    Abstract:

    15.1 Introduction

    15.2 Functional properties

    15.3 Main uses of galangal

    15.4 Quality issues and adulteration

    Chapter 16: Kaffir lime leaf

    Abstract:

    16.1 Introduction

    16.2 Cultivation and production

    16.3 Chemical composition

    16.4 Main uses and functional properties

    Chapter 17: Lavender

    Abstract:

    17.1 Introduction

    17.2 Production

    17.3 Main uses in food processing, perfumery and paramedical spheres

    17.4 Functional properties and toxicity

    17.5 Quality issues and adulteration

    Chapter 18: Lemongrass

    Abstract:

    18.1 Introduction

    18.2 Chemical composition

    18.3 Production

    18.4 Harvesting and processing

    18.5 Main uses of lemongrass

    18.6 Quality issues

    Chapter 19: Lovage

    Abstract:

    19.1 Introduction

    19.2 Chemical composition

    19.3 Cultivation and production

    19.4 Main uses in food

    19.5 Functional properties

    Chapter 20: Nigella

    Abstract:

    20.1 Introduction and description

    20.2 Production and international trade

    20.3 Functional properties

    20.4 Toxicity

    20.5 Quality issues

    Chapter 21: Oregano

    Abstract:

    21.1 Introduction and description

    21.2 Production and cultivation

    21.3 Main uses in food processing and medicine

    21.4 Functional properties

    21.5 Quality specifications and commercial issues

    Chapter 22: Poppy

    Abstract:

    22.1 Introduction and description

    22.2 Production, cultivation and chemical composition

    22.3 Main uses of poppy

    22.4 Quality issues

    Chapter 23: Sesame

    Abstract:

    23.1 Introduction

    23.2 Chemical composition

    23.3 Production: crop adaptation

    23.4 Cultivation

    23.5 Harvesting and post-harvest production

    23.6 Processing of sesame

    23.7 Main uses of sesame seed

    23.8 Quality issues

    23.9 Future trends

    Chapter 24: Star anise

    Abstract:

    24.1 Introduction and description

    24.2 Oil extraction

    24.3 Physical properties and chemical constituents of star anise oil

    24.4 Quality issues and specifications

    24.5 Main uses of star anise

    24.6 World trade

    Chapter 25: Tarragon

    Abstract:

    25.1 Introduction and description

    25.2 Cultivation and processing

    25.3 Main uses and functional properties

    25.4 Quality issues

    Chapter 26: Tamarind

    Abstract:

    26.1 Introduction

    26.2 Production and cultivation

    26.3 Main uses of tamarind products

    26.4 Functional properties

    26.5 Quality issues

    Chapter 27: Other herbs and spices: achiote to Szechuan pepper

    Abstract:

    27.1 Introduction

    27.2 Achiote (annatto)

    27.3 Chamomile

    27.4 Galanga

    27.5 Horseradish

    27.6 Hyssop

    27.7 Juniper berry

    27.8 Kokum and Malabar tamarind

    27 8.2 Related species

    27.9 Large cardamom

    27.10 Lemon balm

    27.11 Long pepper

    27.12 Szechuan pepper

    Chapter 28: Other herbs and spices: mango ginger to wasabi

    Abstract:

    28.1 Introduction

    28.2 Mango ginger

    28.3 Fragrant pandan

    28.4 Pink peppercorn

    28.5 Rue

    28.6 Sumac

    28.7 Summer savory and winter savory

    28.8 Wasabi

    28.9 Less well-known spices and herbs

    Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 624
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Woodhead Publishing 2012
  • Published: September 21, 2012
  • Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780081016176
  • eBook ISBN: 9780857095688

About the Editor

K V Peter