Handbook of Antioxidants for Food Preservation - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782420897, 9781782420972

Handbook of Antioxidants for Food Preservation

1st Edition

Editors: Fereidoon Shahidi
eBook ISBN: 9781782420972
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782420897
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 26th February 2015
Page Count: 514
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Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • Preface
  • 1. Antioxidants: principles and applications
    • 1.1. Introduction
    • 1.2. Phenolic compounds in plant foods and natural health products and their structural features
    • 1.3. Mixed tocopherols
    • 1.4. Green tea
    • 1.5. Rosemary and other herbs and spices
    • 1.6. Food processing adjuncts as antioxidants
    • 1.7. Legal status of antioxidants
  • Part One. Types of antioxidant for food preservation
    • 2. Carotenes and xanthophylls as antioxidants
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Antioxidant activity
      • 2.3. Prooxidant activity
      • 2.4. Interaction with other dietary antioxidants
      • 2.5. Role in human health
      • 2.6. Carotenes
      • 2.7. Xanthophylls
      • 2.8. Final considerations
    • 3. Synthetic phenolics as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 3.1. Introduction and background
      • 3.2. Physical and chemical properties
      • 3.3. Toxicology
      • 3.4. Regulations in various countries
      • 3.5. Prevalence of SPAs in food
      • 3.6. Analytical methods for the determination of SPAs
      • 3.7. Conclusion
      • List of abbreviations
    • 4. Metal chelators as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Catalytic metals
      • 4.3. Reactive oxygen species
      • 4.4. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid
      • 4.5. Sodium tripolyphosphate
      • 4.6. Citric acid
      • 4.7. Nontraditional metal chelators
      • 4.8. Sources of additional information
    • 5. Amino acids, peptides, and proteins as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Antioxidant properties of free amino acids
      • 5.3. Antioxidant proteins
      • 5.4. Antioxidant peptides and protein hydrolysates
      • 5.5. Other potential health effects
      • 5.6. Conclusions and future direction
    • 6. Tocopherols and tocotrienols as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Structures and properties of tocopherols and tocotrienols
      • 6.3. Tocopherols and tocotrienols as the main antioxidants for lipids: mechanisms of antioxidant action
      • 6.4. Paradoxes in the antioxidant efficacy of tocopherols
    • 7. Food antioxidant conjugates and lipophilized derivatives
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Gallic acid and its esters in oil–water emulsions
      • 7.3. Partitioning of gallates in emulsions
      • 7.4. Antioxidant activity of gallates in emulsions
      • 7.5. Antioxidant activity of alpha-tocopherol and trolox
      • 7.6. Ascorbyl palmitate and ascorbic acid
      • 7.7. Sinapic acid and its conjugates
      • 7.8. Activity of antioxidants and their conjugates in bulk oil, o/w and w/o emulsions
      • 7.9. Activity of antioxidants and their conjugates in processed meat
    • 8. Rosemary and sage extracts as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Rosemary and sage – two Laminacae (Labiatae) herbs
      • 8.3. History of rosemary and sage extracts as antioxidants
      • 8.4. Antioxidant species present in rosemary and sage
      • 8.5. Production of extracts
      • 8.6. General types of rosemary extracts available commercially
      • 8.7. Application of rosemary and sage antioxidants in foods, singly and in combination with other natural antioxidants
      • 8.8. Regulatory status
      • 8.9. Conclusion
    • 9. Tea extracts as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Types of tea and their contents
      • 9.3. Applications of tea extracts as antioxidant food additives
      • 9.4. Conclusions
    • 10. Natural plant extracts as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Functionality of antioxidants in dietary plants
      • 10.3. Antioxidant properties and application of natural plant extracts and/or bioactives
      • 10.4. Commentary and future trends of food antioxidants
    • 11. Herbs and spices as antioxidants for food preservation
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Classification of spices and herbs
      • 11.3. Lipid oxidation in foods
      • 11.4. Antioxidants from spices and herbs
      • 11.5. Desirable properties of antioxidants
      • 11.6. Different forms of antioxidants from spices and herbs for food application
      • 11.7. Evaluation of antioxidant activity of spices and herbs
      • 11.8. Summary and future trends
  • Part Two. The performance of antioxidants in different food systems
    • 12. Methods for the assessment of antioxidant activity in foods
      • 12.1. Lipid oxidation and its action mechanisms
      • 12.2. Antioxidants
      • 12.3. Chemical assays
      • 12.4. Antioxidant evaluation in food model systems
      • 12.5. Assessment of antioxidant activity in biological model systems
      • 12.6. Summary
    • 13. Synergistic interactions between antioxidants used in food preservation
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Interactions of antioxidants
      • 13.3. Practical considerations in dealing with synergistic interaction of antioxidants
      • 13.4. Conclusion
    • 14. The use and effectiveness of antioxidants in lipids preservation: beyond the polar paradox
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. The polar paradox paradigm: entering the antioxidant chemistry into a rational era
      • 14.3. Efficacy of food antioxidants in bulk oils
      • 14.4. Efficacy of food antioxidants in lipid dispersions and living cells
      • 14.5. Conclusion
    • 15. The use of antioxidants in the preservation of edible oils
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Antioxidant regulatory status in fats and oils
      • 15.3. Major fats and oils
      • 15.4. Application of natural antioxidants in fats and oils
      • 15.5. Conclusion
    • 16. The use of antioxidants in the preservation of food emulsion systems
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Lipid oxidation in emulsions
      • 16.3. Antioxidants
      • 16.4. Antioxidant protection in emulsified food products
      • 16.5. Conclusions
      • 16.6. Future trends
    • 17. The use of antioxidants in the preservation of cereals and low-moisture foods
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Antioxidants in cereals
      • 17.3. Phenolic compounds
      • 17.4. Phenolic acids
      • 17.5. Flavonoids
      • 17.6. Alkylresorcinols
      • 17.7. Lignans
      • 17.8. Avenanthramides
      • 17.9. Carotenoids
      • 17.10. Tocopherols and tocotrienols
      • 17.11. Phytosterols
      • 17.12. Phytic acid
    • 18. The use of antioxidants in ready-to-eat (RTE) and cook-chill food products
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Fruit and vegetable products
      • 18.3. Cereal products
      • 18.4. Meat, fish and their products
      • 18.5. Beverages
      • 18.6. Chocolates
      • 18.7. Peanut butter
      • 18.8. Conclusion
    • 19. The use of antioxidants in the preservation of snack foods
      • 19.1. Antioxidants from snack ingredients
      • 19.2. Effects of snack processing on antioxidant activity
      • 19.3. Antioxidants in commercial snack products
      • Disclaimer
  • Index

Description

Lipid oxidation in food leads to rancidity, which compromises the sensory properties of food and makes it unappealing to consumers. The growing trend towards natural additives and preservatives means that new antioxidants are emerging for use in foods. This book provides an overview of the food antioxidants currently available and their applications in different food products. Part one provides background information on a comprehensive list of the main natural and synthetic antioxidants used in food. Part two looks at methodologies for using antioxidants in food, focusing on the efficacy of antioxidants. Part three covers the main food commodities in which antioxidants are used.

Key Features

  • Reviews the various types of antioxidants used in food preservation, including chapters on tea extracts, natural plant extracts and synthetic phenolics
  • Analyses the performance of antixoxidants in different food systems
  • Compiles significant international research and advancements

Readership

R&D and product development managers working with lipid ingredients, short shelf-life products and preservatives. Academics and postgraduate students with a research interest in this field.


Details

No. of pages:
514
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782420972
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782420897

About the Editors

Fereidoon Shahidi Editor

Professor Fereidoon Shahidi is a University Research Professor at the Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. He is highly respected for his research in such areas as marine products and functional foods.

Affiliations and Expertise

University Research Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada