Graphene, Nanotubes and Quantum Dots-Based Nanotechnology

Graphene, Nanotubes and Quantum Dots-Based Nanotechnology

Fundamentals and Applications

1st Edition - July 28, 2022

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  • Editor: Yarub Al-Douri
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323854573
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323854580

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Description

A comprehensive look combining experimental and theoretical approaches to graphene, nanotubes, and quantum dots-based nanotechnology evaluation and development are including a review of key applications. Graphene, nanotubes, and quantum dots-based nanotechnology review the fundamentals, processing methods, and applications of this key materials system. The topics addressed are comprehensive including synthesis, preparation, both physical and chemical properties, both accepted and novel processing methods, modeling, and simulation. The book provides fundamental information on key properties that impact performance, such as crystal structure and particle size, followed by different methods to analyze, measure, and evaluate graphene, nanotubes, and quantum dots-based nanotechnology and particles. Finally, important applications are covered, including different applications of biomedical, energy, electronics, etc. Graphene, nanotubes, and quantum dots-based nanotechnology is appropriate for those working in the disciplines of nanotechnology, materials science, chemistry, physics, biology, and medicine.

Key Features

  • Provides a comprehensive overview of key topics both on the experimental side and the theoretical
  • Discusses important properties that impact graphene, nanotubes, and quantum dots performance, processing methods both novel and accepted and important applications
  • Reviews the most relevant applications, such as biomedical, energy, electronics, and materials ones

Readership

Materials Scientists and Engineers, Physicists, Chemists

Table of Contents

  • Cover Image
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 Introduction to graphene
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2 Graphene the carbon allotrope
  • 1.3 Bandgap structure and carrier density
  • 1.4 Electron transport
  • 1.5 Ballistic transport
  • 1.6 Magneto-transport
  • 1.7 Quantum electrochemical potential
  • 1.8 Closing remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Synthesis methods of graphene
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Top-down approaches
  • 2.3 Bottom-up approach
  • 2.4 Outlook and conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Chemical properties of graphene
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Chemical properties of graphene
  • 3.3 Graphene functionalization
  • 3.4 Chemical properties of graphene-based nanocomposites
  • 3.5 Characterization of chemical properties of graphene
  • 3.6 Summary
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Analysis and characterization of graphene
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Structural properties of graphene
  • 4.3 Characterization of graphene as electrode material for energy storage device
  • 4.4 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Morphology and topography of graphene
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Morphology characterization of graphene
  • 5.3 Topography characterization of graphene
  • 5.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Mechanical behavior of graphene conductive ink for wearable applications
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Methodology
  • 6.3 Results and discussions
  • 6.4 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Functionalized 2D materials
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Inorganic functionalization of 2D materials
  • 7.3 Molecular functionalization of 2D materials
  • 7.4 Defect engineering
  • 7.5 Future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Graphene oxide
  • 8.1 Historical development of graphene oxide
  • 8.2 Mechanism of formation
  • 8.3 Properties and emerging applications
  • 8.4 Present challenges and future opportunities of graphene oxide
  • 8.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Graphene and optoelectronics
  • 9.1 Introduction and background
  • 9.2 Graphene synthesis and processing
  • 9.3 Graphene's optoelectronic properties
  • 9.4 Graphene-based photodiodes
  • 9.5 Graphene-based solar cells
  • 9.6 Graphene-based light-emitting diodes
  • 9.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Synthesis, properties, and application of biomass-derived graphene-like material
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Synthesis method for biomass-derived graphene-like material
  • 10.3 Properties of biomass-derived graphene
  • 10.4 Applications of biomass-derived graphene
  • 10.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Application of graphene in supercapacitors, batteries, and fuel cells
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Application of graphene in supercapacitors
  • 11.3 Application of graphene in batteries
  • 11.4 Application of graphene in fuel cells
  • 11.5 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Introduction to carbon nanotubes and nanoribbons
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Chirality
  • 12.3 Graphene to CNT
  • 12.4 CNT density of states
  • 12.5 Graphene nanoribbons
  • 12.6 Closing remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Synthesis methods of nanotubes
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Ball milling
  • 13.3 Arc discharge processing
  • 13.4 Chemical vapor deposition
  • 13.5 Laser ablation
  • 13.6 Electrochemical processing
  • 13.7 Other methods
  • 13.8 Purification
  • 13.9 Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Chemical properties of carbon nanotubes
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Chemical properties of CNTs
  • 14.3 Method to improve the chemical properties of carbon nanotubes
  • 14.4 Application of CNTs
  • 14.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Physical properties of carbon nanotubes and nanoribbons
  • 15.1 CNT carrier statistics
  • 15.2 Equilibrium to nonequilibrium for CNT and GNR
  • 15.3 High-field transport in metallic CNT
  • 15.4 High-field GNR transport
  • 15.5 Ballistic transport in graphene, CNT, and GNR
  • 15.6 Interrelationships between GNR and CNT
  • 15.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Analysis and characterization of carbon nanotube
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Structural properties of carbon nanotube
  • 16.3 Spectroscopies analyses
  • 16.4 Morphological and surface properties by microscopies analyses
  • 16.5 Characterization of carbon nanotube as electrode material for energy storage device
  • 16.6 Device's resistance analysis from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
  • 16.7 Energy density and power density
  • 16.8 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Morphology and topography of nanotubes
  • 17.1 Introducing carbon nanotubes
  • 17.2 Topology and basics nomenclature
  • 17.3 Morphology
  • 17.4 Synthesis and growth mechanism
  • 17.5 Morphological and topographical analysis techniques
  • 17.6 Functional properties
  • 17.7 Applications
  • 17.8 Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 18 Functionalized nanotubes
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Functionalization process
  • 18.3 Effects of functional chemical groups of nanomaterials
  • 18.4 DESs as a functionalization agent
  • 18.5 Applications of functionalized CNTs
  • 18.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19 Mechanical properties of nanotubes
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Classification of nanotubes structure and properties
  • 19.3 Unit cell of nanotubes
  • 19.4 Carbon nanotubes, synthesis, and applications
  • 19.5 Single, double, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes
  • 19.6 Carbon nanotubes reinforced metal matrix composite
  • 19.7 Titanium oxide nanotubes
  • 19.8 Boron nitride nanotubes: Synthesis, properties, and functionalization
  • 19.9 Silicon carbide nanotubes, mechanical properties, and applications
  • 19.10 Conclusions
  • 19.11 Future perspectives
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 20 Industrial applications of nanotubes
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Nanotubes properties
  • 20.3 Nanotubes applications
  • 20.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 21 Comprehensive multiscale techniques to estimate the compressive strength of concrete incorporated with carbon nanotubes at various curing times and mix proportions
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Methodology
  • 21.3 Statistical evaluation of normal strength concrete properties modified with CNT
  • 21.4 Modeling
  • 21.5 Assessment criteria for models
  • 21.6 Analysis and output
  • 21.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 22 Carbon nanostructures and 2D transition metal dichalcogenides
  • 22.1 Carbon nanostructures
  • 22.2 Transition metal dichalcogenides
  • 22.3 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23 Applications of nanotubes in preparation of polymer composite materials
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 Preparation of nanotube polymer composite
  • 23.3 Application of CNT polymer composite
  • 23.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 24 Introduction to quantum dots
  • 24.1 Defining a nanomaterial—How much is the volume of a material on its surface?
  • 24.2 Classification of nanocrystals based on morphology
  • 24.3 Forces in nanostructured materials
  • 24.4 Variation in electronic properties with increase in surface fraction
  • 24.5 Structure of CdSe quantum dots
  • 24.6 Thermal properties of quantum dots
  • 24.7 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 25 Synthesis methods of quantum dots
  • 25.1 Introduction
  • 25.2 Bottom-up approach
  • 25.3 Other synthesis processes
  • 25.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 26 Optical properties of quantum dots
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Quantum dots
  • 26.3 Computational method
  • 26.4 Experimental techniques
  • 26.5 Results and discussion
  • 26.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 27 Chemical properties of quantum dots
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Principle of quantum dots work
  • 27.3 Parts of quantum dots
  • 27.4 Forms of quantum dots
  • 27.5 Chemical composition of quantum dots
  • 27.6 Surface ligands and coordination of quantum dots
  • 27.7 Oxidation of quantum dots
  • 27.8 Redox chemistry of quantum dots
  • 27.9 Chemical stability of quantum dots
  • 27.10 Chemical reactions involving the surface of quantum dots
  • 27.11 Thermodynamic properties of quantum dots
  • 27.12 Kinetic properties of quantum dots
  • 27.13 Toxicity of quantum dots
  • 27.14 Conclusion
  • Future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 28 Physical properties of quantum dots
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 Carbon quantum dots
  • 28.3 Graphene quantum dots
  • 28.4 Other quantum dots
  • 28.5 Conclusions and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 29 Analysis and characterization of quantum dots
  • 29.1 Introduction
  • 29.2 Structural characterization techniques
  • 29.3 Size determination techniques
  • 29.4 Optical characterization techniques
  • 29.5 Composition determination
  • 29.6 Supplementary characterization techniques
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 30 Morphology and topography of quantum dots
  • 30.1 Introduction
  • 30.2 Synthesis and creation
  • 30.3 Characterization and analysis
  • Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 31 Industrial applications of quantum dots
  • 31.1 Introduction
  • 31.2 Fabrications of device: From bulk to nanosized materials
  • 31.3 Large-scale production of quantum dots and nanostructured materials
  • 31.4 Evolution of optoelectronic properties: From bulk to nanostructured materials
  • 31.5 Advancement of photovoltaic technology using QDS: Future of energy generation industry
  • 31.6 The trends in research and development sector incorporating bulk and QDS: Energy generation, energy storage, and energy emitting devices
  • 31.7 31.7 Simulated QD-based device structure vs laboratory scale vs. industry scale
  • 31.8 Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 32 Medical applications of quantum dots
  • 32.1 Introduction
  • 32.2 Semiconductors QD
  • 32.3 Quantum dots in biomedical
  • 32.4 Property of Q dots
  • 32.5 Applications
  • 32.6 Disclosure
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 33 Environmental impact of quantum dots
  • 33.1 Introduction
  • 33.2 Toxicity of quantum dots
  • 33.3 Environmental degradation of quantum dots
  • 33.4 Methods for prevention of QDs degradation
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 34 Quantum dots embedded ceramic materials—Synthesis and application
  • 34.1 Introduction
  • 34.2 Fabrication methods
  • 34.3 Properties of QD embedded glass ceramics
  • 34.4 Applications
  • 34.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 35 Quantum dots: policy and ethics
  • 35.1 Introduction
  • 35.2 Toxicity of QDs
  • 35.3 Quantum dots risks and ecotoxicology
  • 35.4 Minimizing the toxicity of quantum dots and outlook
  • 35.5 Uncertainty around quantum dots in different applications
  • 35.6 Policies and public issues, legal concerns
  • 35.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 36 Quantum dots for modern display devices
  • 36.1 The magical journey of displays: Big CRT screens to foldable ones
  • 36.2 Current perspective and challenges in displays
  • 36.3 Quantum dots: A toolbox for future of display technologies
  • 36.4 Quantum dots in display technologies
  • 36.5 Quantum dot family for displays
  • 36.6 LCD vs OLED vs QLED
  • 36.7 Future opportunities and recycling of display devices
  • 36.8 Conclusions
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 976
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Woodhead Publishing 2022
  • Published: July 28, 2022
  • Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323854573
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323854580

About the Editor

Yarub Al-Douri

Dr. Yarub Al-Douri is a Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology at the University of Malaya in Malaysia and is a Visiting Professor at Cihan University Sulaimaniya, Sulaimaniya, Iraq and an Adjunct Professor at Bahcesehir University, Istanbul, Turkey. He is the Founding Editor-in-Chief of Experimental and Theoretical Nanotechnology and the Editor-in-Chief of World Journal of Nano Science and Engineering.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Malaya, Malaysia; Visiting Professor, Cihan University Sulaimaniya, Sulaimaniya, Iraq; Adjunct Professor, Bahcesehir University, Istanbul, Turkey

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