Description

Geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide, in saline aquifers, depleted oil and gas fields or unminable coal seams, represents one of the most important processes for reducing humankind’s emissions of greenhouse gases. Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) reviews the techniques and wider implications of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS).

Part one provides an overview of the fundamentals of the geological storage of CO2. Chapters discuss anthropogenic climate change and the role of CCS, the modelling of storage capacity, injectivity, migration and trapping of CO2, the monitoring of geological storage of CO2, and the role of pressure in CCS. Chapters in part two move on to explore the environmental, social and regulatory aspects of CCS including CO2 leakage from geological storage facilities, risk assessment of CO2 storage complexes and public engagement in projects, and the legal framework for CCS. Finally, part three focuses on a variety of different projects and includes case studies of offshore CO2 storage at Sleipner natural gas field beneath the North Sea, the CO2CRC Otway Project in Australia, on-shore CO2 storage at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany, and the K12-B CO2 injection project in the Netherlands.

Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) is a comprehensive resource for geoscientists and geotechnical engineers and academics and researches interested in the field.

Key Features

  • Reviews the techniques and wider implications of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS)
  • An overview of the fundamentals of the geological storage of CO2 discussing the modelling of storage capacity, injectivity, migration and trapping of CO2 among other subjects
  • Explores the environmental, social and regulatory aspects of CCS including CO2 leakage from geological storage facilities, risk assessment of CO2 storage complexes and the legal framework for CCS

Readership

Petrologists, geoscientists, geotechnical engineers; Academic and researchers in the fields of earth sciences, geology, geoscience, petroleum engineering, reservoir engineering, and CO2 science

Table of Contents

Contributor contact details

Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy

Foreword

Introduction

Part I: Fundamentals of the geological storage of CO2

Chapter 1: Anthropogenic climate change and the role of CO2 capture and storage (CCS)

Abstract:

1.1 Climate change and anthropogenic emissions of CO2

1.2 Emissions of CO2

1.3 CO2 capture and storage

1.4 Trends in CO2 capture and storage (CCS)

Chapter 2: CO2 storage capacity calculation using static and dynamic modelling

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Static methods for deep saline aquifers

2.3 Dynamic methods for deep saline aquifers

2.4 Storage capacity in oil and gas reservoirs and unmineable coal seams

2.5 Examples of CO2 storage assessment projects

2.6 Conclusion

2.7 Challenges and future trends

2.8 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 3: Modelling the injectivity, migration and trapping of CO2 in carbon capture and storage (CCS)

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Reservoir processes and how they are modelled

3.3 Engineering options to manage CO2 storage

3.4 Challenges and future trends

Chapter 4: Monitoring the geological storage of CO2

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Storage site monitoring aims

4.3 Types of monitoring technologies and techniques

4.4 Monitoring strategies

4.5 Monitoring results: modelling temporal responses

4.6 Challenges and future trends

4.7 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 5: The role of pressure in carbon capture and storage (CCS)

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Types of CO2 storage units

5.3 Relevance of pressure to CO2 storage sites

5.4 Conclusion

Details

No. of pages:
366
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857097279
Print ISBN:
9780857094278

About the editors

J Gluyas

Jon Gluyas is Professor in Geo-Energy and CCS, Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, UK.

S Mathias

Dr Simon Mathias is a Reader in Computational Geoscience, Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, UK.

Affiliations and Expertise

Durham University, UK

Reviews

"Geologists and petroleum engineers explore the fundamental science and engineering of storing carbon dioxide underground; environmental, social, and regulatory aspects; and case studies. The topics include calculating storage capacity using static and dynamic modeling, the role of pressure in carbon capture and storage, the risk assessment of storage complexes and public engagement in projects, the on-shore storage at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany,…"--ProtoView.com, February 2014
"This book spreads itself widely, covering everything from the planning and use of storage itself to the legal frameworks (where they exist), regulation and risk assessment…Aimed at an academic and technical audience, this title offers a comprehensive review of current theory, techniques and practice."--Real Power, Autumn 2013