Table of Contents

Historical Introduction. Market Equilibrium: A First Approach. Production Decisions and the Boundedness of the Economy. Consumer Decisions and Efficient Allocations. The Existence of Competitive Equilibrium. General Equilibrium under Alternative Assumptions. Markets with Non-Convex Preferences. The Core of a Market Economy. The Uniqueness of Competitive Equilibrium. Comparing Equilibria. Introduction to Stability Analysis. Stability with Recontracting. Trading out of Equilibrium: A Pure Exchange Economy. The Keynesian Model. Mathematical Appendix A: Positive Matrices. Mathematical Appendix B: Convex and Related Sets. Mathematical Appendix C: Fixed Point Theorems and Related Combinatorial Algorithms. Indexes.

Details

No. of pages:
468
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 1971
Published:
Imprint:
North Holland
Electronic ISBN:
9780080933559
Print ISBN:
9780444854971
Print ISBN:
9781493302529

About the authors

Kenneth Arrow

Kenneth Arrow is the Joan Kenney Professor of Economics and Professor of Operations Research, emeritus; a CHP/PCOR fellow; and an FSI senior fellow by courtesy. He is the joint winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics with John Hicks in 1972. To date, he is the youngest person to have received this award, at 51. In economics, he is a figure in post-World War II neo-classical economic theory. Many of his former graduate students have gone on to win the Nobel Memorial Prize themselves. His most significant works are his contributions to social choice theory, notably "Arrow's impossibility theorem", and his work on general equilibrium analysis. He has also provided foundational work in many other areas of economics, including endogenous growth theory and the economics of information. He has been co-editor of the Handbooks in Economics series since the mid-1980s.

Reviews

@qu:...Arrow and Hahn have provided a definitive analysis (of general equilibrium) that is likely to stand for some years to come ... The book ... is far and away the best and most definitive work on general equilibrium ... It is clearly a must for every economic theorist. @source:Journal of Economic Literature