Gene Probes for Bacteria

Gene Probes for Bacteria

1st Edition - January 1, 1990

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  • Editor: Alberto Macario
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323146692

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Description

Gene Probes for Bacteria focuses on the preparation and use of nucleic acid probes for identifying bacteria in clinical specimens and in other samples of practical or scientific interest. Organized into 17 chapters, this book addresses which nucleic acid probes are available; how and when to utilize them; what to expect in terms of results obtained with their use; and how to prepare probes. Each chapter is composed of comprehensive manuscript covering different microorganisms. A few bacterial species are treated in more than one chapter to provide a multidimensional picture of important microbes, and to compile the knowledge gained from different laboratories using the same or different probes or methods. This reference material will be of great use to professionals, technicians, and R&D directors in universities, federal and state-dependent service and research institutes, and private and industrial laboratories.

Table of Contents


  • Contributors

    Preface

    Introduction

    1 The Use of Nonradioactive DNA Probes for Rapid Diagnosis of Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    2 Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis with DNA Probes

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    3 Construction of DNA Probes for the Identification of Haemophilus ducreyi

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    4 Detection of Diarrheogenic Escherichia coli Using Nucleotide Probes

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Immunological Assays

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    5 DNA Probes for Escherichia coli Isolates from Human Extraintestinal Infections

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes Compared with Other Methods of Detection

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    6 Identification of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by Colony Hybridization Using Biotinylated LTIh, STIa, and STIb Enterotoxin Probes

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    References

    7 Early days in the Use of DNA Probes for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    8 Att Sites, Tox Gene, and Insertion Elements as Tools for the Diagnosis and Molecular Epidemiology of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions and Prospects for the Future

    V. Summary

    VI. Materials and Methods

    References

    9 Nucleic Acid Probes for Bacteroides Species

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    10 Nucleic Acid Probes for Campylobacter Species

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    11 Detection of Leptospira, Haemophilus, and Campylobacter Using DNA Probes

    I. Introduction

    II. Leptospirosis

    III. Haemophilus

    IV. Campylobacter

    V. Conclusions

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    12 Nucleic Acid Probes for the Identification of Salmonella

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    References

    13 Gene Probes for Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Hybridization Assay versus Conventional Assays

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    14 The Use of Gene and Antibody Probes in Identification and Enumeration of Rumen Bacterial Species

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies: Prospects for the Future

    VI. Summary

    VII. Materials and Methods

    References

    15 Gene Probe Detection of Human and Cell Culture Mycoplasmas

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    16 Detection of TEM β-Lactamase Genes Using DNA Probes

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Gene Probes versus Antisera and Monoclonal Antibodies

    VI. Prospects for the Future

    VII. Summary

    VIII. Materials and Methods

    References

    17 SIA Technology for Probing Microbial Genes

    I. Introduction

    II. Background

    III. Results and Discussion

    IV. Conclusions

    V. Prospects for the Future

    VI. Summary

    VII. Materials and Methods

    References

    Index






Product details

  • No. of pages: 540
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 1990
  • Published: January 1, 1990
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323146692

About the Editor

Alberto Macario

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