Future Foods

Future Foods

Global Trends, Opportunities, and Sustainability Challenges

1st Edition - December 4, 2021

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  • Editor: Rajeev Bhat
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323910026
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323910019

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Description

Future Foods: Global Trends, Opportunities, and Sustainability Challenges highlights trends and sustainability challenges along the entire agri-food supply chain. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this book addresses innovations, technological developments, state-of-the-art based research, value chain analysis, and a summary of future sustainability challenges. The book is written for food scientists, researchers, engineers, producers, and policy makers and will be a welcomed reference.

Key Features

  • Provides practical solutions for overcoming recurring sustainability challenges along the entire agri-food supply chain
  • Highlights potential industrial opportunities and supports circular economy concepts
  • Proposes novel concepts to address various sustainability challenges that can affect and have an impact on the future generations

Readership

Food scientists, researchers, engineers, producers, and policy makers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Emerging trends and sustainability challenges in the global agri-food sector
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Sector-based sustainability challenges
  • 3: Innovative technologies for agri-food industry
  • 4: New food ingredients and designer foods
  • 5: Underutilized resources
  • 6: Food security, self-sufficiency and climate change impacts
  • 7: Traditional food sector
  • 8: Consumers and the food industry
  • 9: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Approaches for sustainable food production and consumption systems
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: First challenge: Sustainable development of food systems
  • 3: Second challenge: Reduction of food loss and waste
  • 4: Third challenge: Global healthy diets
  • 5: Conclusion: Opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Smart and sustainable food: What is ahead?
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction: The socio-ecological problems of the agri-food sector
  • 2: The role of digital technologies
  • 3: Impacts and solutions
  • 4: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Climate change and future of agri-food production
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: World population trends and pressure on agricultural production
  • 3: Climate change: An overview
  • 4: Trends, projections and impacts of climate change on crop production
  • 5: Extreme weather events and their impacts on agriculture
  • 6: Impact of sea-level rise on coastal agriculture
  • 7: Climate change and invasive alien plants: Distribution, changes, and impacts on agriculture
  • 8: Pests and pathogens under a changing climate and their impacts on food production
  • 9: Neglected, underutilized and wild edible plants: Mainstreaming into food systems
  • 10: Climate change impacts—Adaptation and mitigation for food security
  • 11: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Future grain crops
  • Abstract
  • Graphical abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Brief overview of the grains that feed the world
  • 3: Pseudocereals
  • 4: Nutritional and polyphenol composition
  • 5: Pests and diseases in cereal grains
  • 6: Technology application and agriculture
  • 7: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Expectations for household food security in the coming decades: A global scenario
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Global food crises: A snapshot
  • 3: Food production
  • 4: Future challenges for food security
  • 5: Sustainable food systems: A means to improve food security
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Underutilized fruits: Challenges and constraints for domestication
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Underutilized fruits: Unlocking pathway to sustainable diets
  • 3: Potential use of underutilized fruits
  • 4: Domestication of UFs: Principle strategies for tree domestication
  • 5: Challenges and constraints for domestication
  • 6: Proposed domestication strategies
  • 7: Conclusion, opportunities and future prospects
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8: Mainstreaming underutilized legumes for providing nutritional security
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Orphan crops: Need for mainstreaming
  • 3: Diverse attributes of legumes
  • 4: A brief note on some of the underutilized legumes
  • 5: Current status and prospects of underutilized legumes
  • 6: Opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Designer food and feeds from underutilized fruits and vegetables
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Underutilized fruits
  • 3: Underutilized vegetables, cereals, and pulses
  • 4: Health benefits of designer foods with underutilized fruits and vegetables
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Seaweeds and microalgal biomass: The future of food and nutraceuticals
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nutritional attributes of algae
  • 3: Use of algae or algal derived ingredients in food
  • 4: Future trends using algae as food
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Current trends and next generation of future edible oils
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: New sources of the edible oil for the future
  • 3: Perspectives and challenges
  • 4. Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Plant-based milk products
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Market scenario
  • 3: Plant-based milk
  • 4: Powdered milk
  • 5: Cheese
  • 6: Ice cream
  • 7: Fermented plant-based milk and derivatives
  • 8: Fermented beverage products
  • 9: Traditional fermented beverage products
  • 10: Microbiological contamination in vegetable extracts
  • 11: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Nutraceuticals and functional beverages: Focus on Prebiotics and Probiotics active beverages
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nutraceuticals
  • 3: Functional beverages
  • 4: Focus on probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics beverages
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Future innovations in alcohol-based beverage industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The contribution of honey in traditional and novel alcoholic beverages
  • 3: In vitro antioxidant activity of fermented prickly pear juice and pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ex r.f. bayanus) yeast strain in combination with sugar and blossom honey
  • 4: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Future food proteins—Trends and perspectives
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Promising protein sources
  • 3: Protein recovery
  • 4: Design of innovative protein systems
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Mycoprotein: A futuristic portrayal
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Origins & production
  • 3: A futuristic portrayal
  • 4: Human health
  • 5: Planetary health
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Edible vaccines: Current scenario and future prospects
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: A brief history on the development of edible vaccines
  • 3: Advantages of edible vaccines over that of conventional vaccines
  • 4: Limitations
  • 5: Mechanism of action
  • 6: The production of edible vaccines
  • 7: Crops for production of edible vaccines
  • 8: Development of an edible vaccine against COVID-19
  • 9: The second-generation edible vaccines
  • 10: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Sustainability challenges in edible bird’s nest: Full exploitation and health benefit
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Edible bird’s nest
  • 3: Sustainability challenges in E-BN valorization
  • 4: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 19: The future of cultured meat between sustainability expectations and socio-economic challenges
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Positive externalities of cultured meat
  • 3: The potential impact of cultured meat on conventional meat supply chains
  • 4: Consumer perception of cultured meat
  • 5: The naming, terminology, and regulatory framework for cultured meat
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Meat alternatives
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Sustainable meat-free protein alternatives
  • 3: Meat-free protein alternatives
  • 4: Challenges of using plants as a meat substitute
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Innovations in food packaging—Sustainability challenges and future scenarios
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Sustainability challenges
  • 3: Future scenarios
  • 4: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 22: The use of emerging dehydration technologies in developing sustainable food supply chain
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction to sustainability in food supply chain
  • 2: Calculation of GHG emissions and energy consumption
  • 3: Dehydration technologies used in food supply chain
  • 4: The effect of emerging dehydration technologies on food quality
  • 5: The effect of emerging dehydration technologies on GHG emissions
  • 6: The effect of emerging dehydration technologies on cost savings
  • 7: Conclusions, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 23: GASTRONOMY: A novel social representation of foods through consumers’ language
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: What is gastronomy?
  • 3: Social representations: An interesting approach to understanding foods and their conception
  • 4: Theoretical and methodological implications of social representations: The projective technique of word association (WA), the Central Core Theory, and the Cognitive Salience Index (CSI)
  • 5: Towards a novel social representation of gastronomy based on the language of consumers in two Latin American countries
  • 6: Social representations of gastronomy: Future trends, opportunities, and sustainability challenges
  • 7: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Neurobiology of food addiction
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Neurophysiology of food consumption and energy production
  • 3: Drug and food addictions and neural circuit pathways
  • 4: Evidence from animal studies
  • 5: Conclusion: Opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Human population genomics approach in food metabolism
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Human genetic variation and its significance
  • 3: Population genetics of dietary selection and food metabolism
  • 4: Significance and complications of a gene-diet interaction in food metabolism
  • 5: Budding field of nutritional genomics
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Space food on celestial bodies and on the way there
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Space farming
  • 3: Microgravity science
  • 4: Commercializing space-based research of plants
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 27: Designer foods as an effective approach to enhance disease preventative properties of food through its health functionalities
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Designer foods from plant sources
  • 3: Designer foods from animal sources
  • 4: Designer foods from insect source
  • 5: Designer foods from bacteria source
  • 6: Designer foods development
  • 7: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 28: What foods might kids eat in the future? Using plant-based games to educate about sustainable healthy diet
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Playing with coffee waste to be healthy and altruistic in the future: The fungi pack case study
  • 3: Case study
  • 4: Results of the case study
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • Appendix
  • References
  • Chapter 29: Restoring the values of traditional foods
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Institutional resilience
  • 3: The Totonac ethnic group: A case study
  • 4: Indigenous food systems
  • 5: Traditional foods and sustainability challenges
  • 6: Challenges of developing a food agenda for future generations
  • 7: Conclusions, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 30: Between conventionalization and emancipation: Present and future paths for organic food market organization
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The current debate about organic food
  • 3: Recognizing the future of organics in two empirical cases
  • 4: What does our theoretical and empirical analysis reveal about the future of organic food markets?
  • 5: Conclusions, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 31: Agricultural productivity and food supply to meet increased demands
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: History of food production
  • 3: Agricultural food productivity
  • 4: Demand for foods (agricultural products)
  • 5: Agricultural technologies to increase food production
  • 6: Conclusions, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 32: High-productive agricultural technologies to fulfill future food demands: Hydroponics, aquaponics, and precision/smart agriculture
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Hydroponic technology for increasing food production
  • 3: Use of the aquaponic system to integrate plant and fish culture
  • 4: Precision/smart agricultural technologies for increasing food production
  • 5: Conclusions, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 33: Food waste and by-product valorization as an integrated approach with zero waste: Future challenges
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Food wastes and food by-products
  • 3: Valorization strategies for wastes and by-products generated from the food industry toward a circular bioeconomy
  • 4: Legislation and regulations
  • 5: Conclusions, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 34: Food fraud countermeasures and consumers: A future agenda
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Assessment
  • 3: Blockchain and digitization of food chain
  • 4: Deterrence—Food safety (and integrity) culture
  • 5: Prevention
  • 6: Detection
  • 7: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 35: ICT applications for the food industry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Robots in food industries
  • 3: Industry 4.0 evolution in the food-processing sector
  • 4: Components of information and communication technologies
  • 5: Data communication devices and applications in the food industry
  • 6: The IoT in the food industry
  • 7: Summary of key applications of ICT technologies in sustainable food systems
  • 8: Conclusion: Opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 36: 3D food printing: Genesis, trends and prospects
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Printable food product families
  • 3: Main utility of 3DFP: Personalized nutrition
  • 4: Main questions around 3DFP
  • 5: Emerging trends and long-term prospects
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 37: Non-destructive methods for detection of food quality
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Non-destructive methods
  • 3: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 38: Authentication of wine and other alcohol-based beverages—Future global scenario
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Wine authentication
  • 3: Authentication of distilled alcoholic beverages
  • 4: Authentication of other fermented beverages
  • 5: Future scenario
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 39: Food biotechnology: Innovations and challenges
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Impact of biotechnology in the agri-food sector
  • 3: Innovation and challenges for food applications
  • 4: Innovation of the future
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities, and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 40: Nanoscience and nanotechnology advances in food industry
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanotechnology for the food packaging industry
  • 3: Intelligent and active packaging
  • 4: Metallic nanoparticles
  • 5: Biological synthesis of nanoparticles
  • 6: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Chapter 41: Food quality monitoring through bioinformatics and big data
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Conventional analytical-based food quality monitoring tools and their challenges
  • 3: Bioinformatics in monitoring food quality
  • 4: Big data in monitoring food quality
  • 5: Conclusion, opportunities and future challenges
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 786
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: December 4, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323910026
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323910019

About the Editor

Rajeev Bhat

Rajeev Bhat Rajeev Bhat is a professor and the ERA Chair holder in Food By-products Valorization Technologies (VALORTECH) at the Estonian University of Life Sciences, Tartu, EU. He has an extensive research and teaching experience of more than 20 years in the field of agri-food technology, with research expertise focusing on various issues pertaining to sustainable food production and food security. He holds international work experiences in South Korea, India, Malaysia, Germany, Fiji Islands, and now in Estonia. To date, he has nearly 250 research articles published in ISI based journals and as refereed book chapters; has edited seven and authored one book; is on the editorial board of leading International journals; has been a scientific committee/advisory board member and an invited speaker in various international conferences. His name now figures in the World’s top 2% scientists in the field of Food Science & Technology as per the survey done by Stanford University based researchers. He has completed several sponsored research and consultancy projects with funding received from various agencies. Prof. Bhat has also been a visiting professor in many of the renowned universities and is a recipient of several prestigious international awards and recognitions conferred by various institutions of higher learning and research establishments.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and ERA-Chair Holder, Food By-Products Valorization Technologies (VALORTECH), Estonian University of Life Sciences, Tartu, Estonia

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