Foundations of Wireless and Electronics - 10th Edition - ISBN: 9780408015417, 9781483105574

Foundations of Wireless and Electronics

10th Edition

Authors: M. G. Scroggie S. W. Amos
eBook ISBN: 9781483105574
Imprint: Newnes
Published Date: 1st January 1984
Page Count: 570
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Description

Foundations of Wireless and Electronics, 10th Edition covers the cathode-ray and microwave tubes; modern pulse methods; f.m. detectors; basic processes of transmission; and reception, computers, and non-sinusoidal signal amplification. The book starts by giving a general overview of a complete electronic system, electricity and circuits, capacitance, and inductance. The text also discusses alternating currents (a.c.), including the frequency and phase of a.c.; the capacitance and inductance in a.c. circuits; and the capacitance and inductance in a series. Diodes, triode, transistor equivalent circuits, and a suitable working point are also considered. The book describes oscillation, transmission lines, radiation and antennas, and audio-frequency amplification. The super heterodyne principle, radio- and intermediate-frequency amplification, electronic waveform generators, and switches are also encompassed. The text will be useful to electronics engineers, electricians, and computer engineers.

Table of Contents


Preface to Ninth Edition

Preface to Tenth Edition

1 General View of a System

1.1 What Wireless Does

1.2 Nature of Sound Waves

1.3 Characteristics of Sound Waves

1.4 Frequency

1.5 Wavelength

1.6 The Sender

1.7 The Receiver

1.8 Electrical Communication by Wire

1.9 Electric Waves

1.10 Why High Frequencies are Necessary

1.11 Radio Telegraphy

1.12 Tuning

1.13 Radio Telephony

1.14 Recapitulation

2 Electricity and Circuits

2.1 Electrons

2.2 Electric Charges and Currents

2.3 Conductors and Insulators

2.4 Electromotive Force

2.5 Electrical Units

2.6 Ohm's Law

2.7 Larger and Smaller Units

2.8 Circuit Diagrams

2.9 Resistances in Series and in Parallel

2.10 Series-Parallel Combinations

2.11 Resistance Analyzed

2.12 Conductance

2.13 Kirchhof as Laws

2.14 P.D. and E.M.F.

2.15 Electrical Effects

2.16 Instruments for Measuring Electricity

2.17 Electrical Power

2.18 A Broader View of Resistance

3 Capacitance

3.1 Charging Currents

3.2 Capacitance: What it is

3.3 Capacitance Analyzed

3.4 Capacitors

3.5 Charge and Discharge of a Capacitor

3.6 Where the Power Goes

3.7 Recapitulation

3.8 Displacement Currents

4 Inductance

4.1 Magnets and Electromagnets

4.2 Interacting Magnetic Fields

4.3 Induction

4.4 Self-Inductance

4.5 Lenz's Law

4.6 Inductance Analyzed

4.7 Practical Considerations

4.8 Growth of Current in an Inductive Circuit

4.9 Power during Growth

4.10 More Comparison and Contrast

4.11 Mutual Inductance

5 Alternating Currents

5.1 Frequencies of Alternating Current

5.2 The Sine Wave

5.3 Circuit with Resistance Only

5.4 R.M.S. Values

5.5 A.C. Meters

5.6 Phase

5.7 Phasor Diagrams

5.8 Adding Alternating Voltages

5.9 Direction Signs

5.10 Subscript Notation

5.11 Current Phasors

6 Capacitance in A.C. Circuits

6.1 Current Flow in a Capacitive Circuit

6.2 Capacitive Current Waveform

6.3 The Ohm's Law' for Capacitance

6.4 Capacitances in Parallel and in Series

6.5 Power in a Capacitive Circuit

6.6 Phasor Diagram for Capacitive Circuit

6.7 Capacitance and Resistance in Series

6.8 Impedance

6.9 Power in Mixed Circuits

6.10 Capacitance and Resistance in Parallel

7 Inductance in A.C. Circuits

7.1 Current Flow in an Inductive Circuit

7.2 The Ohm's Law' for Inductance

7.3 Inductances in Series and in Parallel

7.4 Power in an Inductive Circuit

7.5 Phasor Diagram for Inductive Circuit

7.6 Inductance and Resistance in Series

7.7 Inductance and Resistance in Parallel

7.8 Transformers

7.9 Load Currents

7.10 Transformer Losses

7.11 Impedance Transformation

8 The Tuned Circuit

8.1 Inductance and Capacitance in Series

8.2 L, Cand R all in Series

8.3 The Series Tuned Circuit

8.4 Magnification

8.5 Resonance Curves

8.6 Selectivity

8.7 Frequency of Resonance

8.8 L and C in Parallel

8.9 The Effect of Resistance

8.10 Dynamic Resistance

8.11 Parallel Resonance

8.12 Frequency of Parallel Resonance

8.13 Series and Parallel Resonance Compared

8.14 The Resistance of the Coil

8.15 Dielectric Losses

8.16 H.F. Resistance

8.17 Cavity Resonators

9 Diodes

9.1 Electronic Devices

9.2 Diodes

9.3 Thermionic Emission of Electrons

9.4 The Vacuum Diode Valve

9.5 Semiconductors

9.6 Holes

9.7 Intrinsic Conduction

9.8 Effects of Impurities

9.9 P-N Junctions

9.10 The Semiconductor Diode

9.11 Diode Characteristics

9.12 Recapitulation

10 Triodes

10.1 The Vacuum Triode Valve

10.2 Amplification Factor

10.3 Mutual Conductance

10.4 Anode Resistance

10.5 Alternating Voltage at the Grid

10.6 Grid Bias

10.7 The Transistor

10.8 Transistor Characteristic Curves

10.9 Transistor Parameters

10.10 Field-Effect Transistors

10.11 Insulated-Gate F.E.Ts

10.12 Light-Sensitive Diodes and Triodes

11 The Triode at Work

11.1 Input and Output

11.2 Source and Load

11.3 Feeds and Signals

11.4 Load Lines

11.5 Voltage Amplification

11.6 An Equivalent Generator

11.7 Calculating Amplification

11.8 The Maximum-Power Law

11.9 Transistor Load Lines

11.10 Class A, A and C Operation

12 Transistor Equivalent Circuits

12.1 The Equivalent Current Generator

12.2 Duality

12.3 Voltage or Current Generator?

12.4 Transistor Equivalent Output Circuit

12.5 Some Box Tricks

12.6 Input Resistance

12.7 Complete Transistor Equivalent Circuit

12.8 A Simpler Equivalent

12.9 Other Circuit Configurations: Common Collector

12.10 Common Base

12.11 A Summary of Results

12.12 F.E.Ts and Valves

13 The Working Point

13.1 Feed Requirements

13.2 Effect of Amplification Factor Variations

13.3 Influence of Leakage Current

13.4 Methods of Base Biasing

13.5 Biasing the F.E.T.

13.6 Valve Biasing

13.7 Biasing by Diodes

14 Oscillation

14.1 Generators

14.2 The Oscillatory Circuit

14.3 Frequency of Oscillation

14.4 Damping

14.5 Maintaining Oscillation

14.6 Practical Oscillator Circuits

14.7 Resistance-Capacitance Oscillators

14.8 Negative Resistance

14.9 Amplitude of Oscillation

14.10 Automatic Biasing of Oscillators

14.11 Distortion of Oscillation

14.12 Constancy of Frequency

14.13 Crystal Oscillators

14.14 Microwave Oscillators

15 Modulation

15.1 The Need for Modulation

15.2 Amplitude Modulation

15.3 Methods of Amplitude Modulation

15.4 Frequency Modulation

15.5 Telegraphy and Keying

15.6 Methods of Frequency Modulation

15.7 Sources of Modulating Signal

15.8 Theory of Sidebands

15.9 Channel Separation

15.10 Multiplex

15.11 Pulse Modulation Systems

16 Transmission Lines

16.1 Feeders

16.2 Circuit Equivalent of a Line

16.3 Characteristic Resistance

16.4 Waves along a Line

16.5 Wave Reflection

16.6 Standing Waves

16.7 Line Impedance Variations

16.8 The Quarter-Wave Transformer

16.9 Fully Resonant Lines

16.10 Lines as Tuned Circuits

16.11 Waveguides or Radio-wave Plumbing

17 Radiation and Antennas

17.1 Bridging Space

17.2 The Quarter-Wave Resonator Again

17.3 A Rope Trick

17.4 Electromagnetic Waves

17.5 Radiation

17.6 Polarization

17.7 Antennas

17.8 Radiation Resistance

17.9 Directional Characteristics

17.10 Reflectors and Directors

17.11 Antenna Gain

17.12 Choice of Frequency

17.13 Influence of the Atmosphere

17.14 Earthed Antennas

17.15 Feeding the Antenna

17.16 Tuning

17.17 Effective Height

17.18 Microwave Antennas

17.19 Inductor Antennas

18 Detection

18.1 The Need for Detection

18.2 The Detector

18.3 Rectifiers

18.4 Linearity of Rectification

18.5 Rectifier Resistance

18.6 Action of Reservoir Capacitor

18.7 Choice of Component Values

18.8 The Diode Detector in Action

18.9 The Detector as a Load

18.10 Filters

18.11 Detector Distortion

18.12 Shunt-Diode Detector

18.13 Television Diode Detector

18.14 F.M. Detectors

18.15 Foster-Seeley Discriminator

18.16 Ratio Detector

18.17 Quadrature Detector

18.18 Phase-Locked-Loop Detector

18.19 Counter Discriminator

19 Audio-Frequency Amplification

19.1 Recapitulation

19.2 Decibels

19.3 Gain/Frequency Distortion

19.4 Non-Linearity Distortion

19.5 Generation of Harmonics

19.6 Intermodulation

19.7 Allowable Limits of Non-Linearity

19.8 Phase Distortion

19.9 Loudspeakers

19.10 The Output Stage

19.11 Class A Amplification

19.12 Distortion with Class A

19.13 Class A Circuits

19.14 Compound Transistors

19.15 Negative Feedback

19.16 Phase Shift with Feedback

19.17 Input and Output Resistance

19.18 Linearizing the Input

19.19 Some Circuit Details

19.20 Noise

19.21 Another Box Trick

20 Selectivity and Tuning

20.1 Need for R.F. Amplification

20.2 Selectivity and Q

20.3 Over-Sharp Tuning

20.4 A General Resonance Curve

20.5 More Than One Tuned Circuit

20.6 Coupled Tuned Circuits

20.7 Effects of Varying Coupling

20.8 Practical Tuning Difficulties

21 The Superheterodyne Principle

21.1 A Difficult Problem Solved

21.2 The Frequency-Changer

21.3 Frequency-Changers as Modulators

21.4 Types of Frequency-Changer

21.5 Conversion Conductance

21.6 Ganging the Oscillator

21.7 Whistles

22 Radio-Frequency and Intermediate-Frequency Amplification

22.1 Amplification So Far

22.2 Active-Device Interelectrode Capacitances

22.3 Miller Effect

22.4 High-Frequency Effects in Transistors

22.5 Transistor Phasor Diagrams

22.6 Limiting Frequencies

22.7 An I.F. Amplifier

22.8 R.F. Amplification

22.9 Screening

22.10 Cross-Modulation

22.11 Automatic Gain Control

22.12 The Antenna Coupling

22.13 Klystrons and Traveling-Wave Tubes

23 Cathode-Ray Tubes: Television and Radar

23.1 Description of Cathode-Ray Tube

23.2 Electric Focusing and Deflection

23.3 Magnetic Deflection and Focusing

23.4 Oscilloscopes

23.5 Time Bases

23.6 Application to Television

23.7 Characteristics of Television Signals

23.8 Television Receivers

23.9 Synchronizing Circuits

23.10 Scanning Circuits

23.11 Color Television

23.12 Application to Radar

24 Non-Sinusoidal Signal Amplification

24.1 Waveforms

24.2 Frequency and Time

24.3 Frequency Range

24.5 Obtaining the High-Frequency Response

24.6 Operational Amplifiers

24.7 Integrated Circuits

25 Electronic Waveform Generators and Switches

25.1 Differentiating and Integrating Circuits

25.2 Waveform Shapers

25.3 Waveform Generators: Relaxation Oscillators

25.4 The Blocking Oscillator

25.5 The Multivibrator

25.6 Bistables

25.7 Monostables

25.8 Clampers and Clippers

25.9 Gates and Choppers

25.10 Design

26 Computers

26.1 Analogue and Digital

26.2 Analogue Computers

26.3 Digital Computers

26.4 The Binary Scale

26.5 Logic Circuits

26.6 Counters

26.7 Stores

26.8 Computer Languages

26.9 Input and Output Devices

26.10 Microprocessors and Microcomputers

Chapter 27 Power Suppliers

27.1 The Power Required

27.2 Batteries

27.3 D.C. from A.C.

27.4 Types of Rectifier

27.5 Rectifier Circuits

27.6 Filters

27.7 Decoupling

27.8 Bias Supplies

27.9 Stabilization

27.10 E.H.T.

27.11 Switch-Mode Power Suppliers

27.12 Cathode Heating

Appendix A Algebraic Symbols

A.1 Letter Symbols

A.2 What Letter Symbols Really Mean

A.3 Some Other Uses of Symbols

A.4 Abbreviations

A.5 How Numbers are Used

Appendix B Graphs

B.l What is a Graph?

B.2 Scales

B.3 What a 'Curve' Signifies

B.4 Three-Dimensional Graphs

B.5 Significance of Slope

B.6 Non-Uniform Scales

Appendix C Alternative Technical Terms

Appendix D Symbols and Abbreviations

Appendix E Decibel Table

Index


Details

No. of pages:
570
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Newnes 1984
Published:
Imprint:
Newnes
eBook ISBN:
9781483105574

About the Author

M. G. Scroggie

S. W. Amos