Food Safety in the 21st Century - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128017739, 9780128018460

Food Safety in the 21st Century

1st Edition

Public Health Perspective

Editors: Puja Dudeja Rajul Gupta Amarjeet Singh Minhas
eBook ISBN: 9780128018460
Paperback ISBN: 9780128017739
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 14th October 2016
Page Count: 624
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Description

Food Safety in the 21st Century: Public Health Perspective is an important reference for anyone currently working in the food industry or those entering the industry. It provides realistic, practical, and very usable information about key aspects of food safety, while also systematically approaching the matter of foodborne illness by addressing the intricacies of both prevention and control.

This book discusses ways to assess risk and to employ epidemiological methods to improve food safety. In addition, it also describes the regulatory context that shapes food safety activities at the local, national, and international levels and looks forward to the future of food safety.

Key Features

  • Provides the latest research and developments in the field of food safety
  • Incorporates practical, real-life examples for risk reduction
  • Includes specific aspects of food safety and the risks associated with each sector of the food chain, from food production, to food processing and serving
  • Describes various ways in which epidemiologic principles are applied to meet the challenges of maintaining a safe food supply in India and how to reduce disease outbreaks
  • Presents practical examples of foodborne disease incidents and their root causes to highlight pitfalls in food safety management

Readership

Food safety professionals (managers, etc.); food handlers; government and policy makers; Food business operators; Graduates in Agriculture/ Food Science or allied disciplines contemplating a career in Food Safety and Quality Management

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • About the Editors
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Section 1: Epidemiological aspects of foodborne diseases
    • Chapter 1: Foodborne diseases—disease burden
      • Abstract
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Factors Affecting Burden of FBD
      • 1.3. Foodborne Zoonotic Diseases
      • 1.4. Noninfection-Based FBD
      • 1.5. Seasonal Variation of FBD
      • 1.6. Challenges in Assessment of Burden of FBD
      • 1.7. Assessment of Disease Burden
      • 1.8. WHO Estimates of the Global Burden of FBD
      • 1.9. WHO Region-Wise Disease Distribution
      • 1.10. FBD in India
      • 1.11. Public Health Impact of the Burden
    • Chapter 2: Foodborne infectious diseases
      • Abstract
      • 2.1. Classification
      • 2.2. Infectious Diseases Spread by Food
      • 2.3. Infections Versus Intoxication
      • 2.4. Transmission
      • 2.5. Food Poisoning
      • 2.6. Salmonellosis
      • 2.7. Staphylococcal Food Poisoning
      • 2.8. C. perfringens Food Poisoning
      • 2.9. Botulism Food Poisoning
      • 2.10. B. cereus Food Poisoning
      • 2.11. E. coli Food Poisoning
      • 2.12. Norovirus Gastroenteritis
      • 2.13. Sanitation of Some Specific Foods
      • 2.14. Foodborne Diseases of Fungal Origin
      • 2.15. Aflatoxicosis
      • 2.16. Foodborne Diseases Caused by Toxic Agents
      • 2.17. Lathyrus Toxin
      • 2.18. Epidemic Dropsy
      • 2.19. Conclusions
    • Chapter 3: Outbreak investigation of foodborne illnesses
      • Abstract
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Trigger Events
    • Chapter 4: Surveillance of foodborne illnesses
      • Abstract
      • 4.1. Definition
      • 4.2. Set Objectives
      • 4.3. Data Collection and Consolidation
      • 4.4. Data Analysis and Interpretation
      • 4.5. Evaluation (Silverman et al., 2009; German et al., 2001; Thacker and Stroup, 1994; WHO, 2013)
      • 4.6. Dissemination (Orenstein and Bernier, 1990; WHO, 1998;  2012)
      • 4.7. Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP, 2009)
      • 4.8. Surveillance Systems in the United States of America (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015a,b)
      • 4.9. Conclusions
    • Chapter 5: Role of risk analysis and risk communication in food safety management
      • Abstract
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Risk Analysis
      • 5.3. Risk Analysis Process
      • 5.4. Risk Assessment
      • 5.5. Risk Assessment Policy
      • 5.6. Risk Management
      • 5.7. General Principles of Food Safety Risk Management
      • 5.8. Risk Management Framework
      • 5.9. Risk Communication
      • 5.10. Conclusions
  • Section 2: Food safety issues in contemporary society
    • Chapter 6: An ayurvedic perspective on food safety
      • Abstract
    • Chapter 7: Food safety in modern society—changing trends of food production and consumption
      • Abstract
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Changing Trends in Food Production
      • 7.3. Changing Trends in Food Consumption
      • 7.4. Hazards Due to Safety Aspects of Food
  • Section 3: Food contamination and adulteration
    • Chapter 8: Food toxicology—past, present, and the future (the Indian perspective)
      • Abstract
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. The History of Food Toxicology
      • 8.3. The Modern History
      • 8.4. Radiation Contamination of Food and Water
      • 8.5. Toxic Waste Imports in India
      • 8.6. Toxicology and Crime
      • 8.7. Poison Control/Information Centers in India
      • 8.8. Food Safety of VVIPs
      • 8.9. Food Security in India
      • 8.10. International/National Activities for Health Protection
      • 8.11. Indian Acts/Laws for Food Safety
      • 8.12. Remedial Measures
    • Chapter 9: Toxicological profile of Indian foods—ensuring food safety in India
      • Abstract
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Classification of Toxins/Toxicants
      • 9.3. Adulteration of Foods
    • Chapter 10: Detection of food adulterants/contaminants
      • Abstract
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Definition of Adulterant/Contaminant and Adulteration
      • 10.3. Economic Adulteration
      • 10.4. Common Adulterants/Contaminants in Foods
      • 10.5. Impact of Food Adulteration on Human Health
      • 10.6. Artificially Ripened Fruits and Mercury Pollution in Fish
      • 10.7. List of Adulterants/Contaminants in Foods and Their Health Effects
      • 10.8. Detection of Adulterants/Contaminants
      • 10.9. Simple Screening Tests for Detection of Adulteration at Home
      • 10.10. Conclusions
    • Chapter 11: Recent advances in detection of food adulteration
      • Abstract
      • 11.1. Color as Food Additive: Detection Methodologies
      • 11.2. Preservatives as Food Additives
      • 11.3. Harmful Aspects of Food Preservatives
      • 11.4. Other Adulterants: a Challenge for Detection
      • 11.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 12: Role of public health food safety laboratories in detection of adulterants/contaminants
      • Abstract
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Conclusions
  • Section 4: Food safety from farm-to-fork
    • Chapter 13: Food-safety issues related to plant foods at farms
      • Abstract
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Fragmented Approach to Food Safety in Past
      • 13.3. Integrated Approach: Farm-to-Fork
      • 13.4. Food Safety at the Farm Level
      • 13.5. Methods to Reduce Hazards at the Farm Level
    • Chapter 14: Food safety from farm-to-fork—food safety issues related to animal foods at farm
      • Abstract
      • 14.1. Animals at Farm
      • 14.2. Safe Animal Feed
      • 14.3. Animal Welfare
      • 14.4. Animal Health
      • 14.5. Animal Living Conditions
    • Chapter 15: Food safety from farm-to-fork—food-safety issues related to processing
      • Abstract
      • 15.1. Hygiene of Staff
      • 15.2. Training of Staff
      • 15.3. Design of Plant
      • 15.4. Maintenance and Sanitation
      • 15.5. Control of Operations
      • 15.6. Product Information and Consumer Awareness
      • 15.7. Record Maintenance for GMPs
      • 15.8. GMP-System Verification
    • Chapter 16: Food safety issues in production of foods of animal origin and from farm to plate
      • Abstract
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Food Safety Issues During Primary Production
      • 16.3. Preslaughter Safety of Meat Animals During Transportation
      • 16.4. The Indian Legislation on Meat Business
      • 16.5. Slaughtering of Animals
      • 16.6. The Slaughterhouse
      • 16.7. Slaughtering
      • 16.8. Poultry Meat
      • 16.9. Veterinary Inspection
      • 16.10. Antemortem Inspection
      • 16.11. Postmortem Inspection
      • 16.12. Meat Food Safety in Domestic Kitchens
      • 16.13. Food Safety Issues During Storage
      • 16.14. Food Safety Controls
      • 16.15. Meat Processing and Marketing
      • 16.16. Food Retailing
      • 16.17. Role of Consumer
      • 16.18. Conclusions
    • Chapter 17: Safe storage and cooking practices for foods of animal origin in home kitchen before consumption
      • Abstract
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Safe Production and Storage of Foods of Animal Origin
      • 17.3. Storage of Foods of Animal Origin
      • 17.4. Handling and Cooking of Foods of Animal Origin in Kitchen
      • 17.5. Preparing Food Safely at Home
      • 17.6. Cooking of Meat or Fish
      • 17.7. Method of Thawing of Frozen Food in a Microwave Oven
  • Section 5: Food safety is a shared responsibility: role of various stakeholders in implementing food safety
    • Chapter 18: Role of government authorities in food safety
      • Abstract
      • 18.1. History of Food Laws in India
      • 18.2. Authorities Under PFA
      • 18.3. New Era of Food Laws in India
      • 18.4. Key Provisions of FSSA
      • 18.5. Important Definitions as Per FSSA
      • 18.6. Other Highlights of FSSA
      • 18.7. Challenges
      • 18.8. Other Government Agencies Working for Food Safety
      • 18.9. Conclusions
    • Chapter 19: Local governing bodies
      • Abstract
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Local Governing Bodies in India
      • 19.3. Responsibilities of the State/District Food Safety LGB
      • 19.4. Responsibility of Municipal Council/Corporation
      • 19.5. Food Safety Plan
      • 19.6. Role of Food Safety Officer (FSO)
      • 19.7. Responsibility of Other Departments/Ministries
      • 19.8. Conclusions
    • Chapter 20: Role of food business operators in food safety
      • Abstract
      • 20.1. Responsibilities of FBO
      • 20.2. Challenges
      • 20.3. The Way Forward
    • Chapter 21: Food handlers
      • Abstract
      • 21.1. Responsibilities of Food Handler
      • 21.2. Food-Safety Requirements for Food Handlers Under Food Safety and Standards Regulations (FSSR 2011)
      • 21.3. Training of Food Handlers
      • 21.4. Occupational Hazards of Food Handlers
      • 21.5. Prevention of Occupational Hazards in Food Handlers
    • Chapter 22: Consumers
      • Abstract
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. Consumers’ Perspective About Food Safety
      • 22.3. Government’s Initiative in Creating Consumer Awareness
      • 22.4. Manufacturer’s Initiatives to Protect Consumer Welfare
      • 22.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 23: Public health professionals and food safety
      • Abstract
      • 23.1. Studying
      • 23.2. Teaching and Training
      • 23.3. Disease Surveillance
      • 23.4. Information, Education, and Communication (IEC)
      • 23.5. Specific Advice and Professional Consultations
      • 23.6. PHP in Public Health Laboratory (PHL)
      • 23.7. Early Diagnosis of Disease
      • 23.8. Investigation of Foodborne Outbreak
      • 23.9. Tackling a New Foodborne Disease
      • 23.10. Documentation and Reporting
      • 23.11. Advisories, Consultancy, and Advocacy
      • 23.12. Policy Making and Administration
      • 23.13. Research
      • 23.14. Leadership
      • 23.15. Conclusions
    • Chapter 24: Role of veterinary experts in food safety
      • Abstract
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Role of Vets in Food Safety Controls and Food Safety Plan
      • 24.3. Scope of Veterinary Education in India
      • 24.4. Role of Vets in Public Health Through Veterinary Public Health in Implementation of Principles of Risk Analysis in Food Safety
      • 24.5. Role of Vets in Preventing Antimicrobial Resistance in Public Health
      • 24.6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 25: Researchers and food safety
      • Abstract
      • 25.1. Introduction
      • 25.2. Who is a Researcher?
      • 25.3. Need of Research in Food Safety
      • 25.4. Research in Food Safety
      • 25.5. Food-Safety Research During Food Production Processes
      • 25.6. Postharvest
      • 25.7. Active Packaging
      • 25.8. Contribution of Specific Branches of Science to Food-Safety Research
      • 25.9. Conclusions
    • Chapter 26: Role of hotel management and catering technology institutes in ensuring food safety
      • Abstract
      • 26.1. Hotel and Catering Industry
      • 26.2. Education and Training of Hotel and Catering Industry Personnel
      • 26.3. Government Initiative in Creating Infrastructure for Education in this Sector
      • 26.4. Importance of Food Safety Education and Training in Hotel and Catering Industry
  • Section 6: Food safety in large eating establishments
    • Chapter 27: Food safety in large organized eating establishments
      • Abstract
      • 27.1. Introduction
      • 27.2. Food Safety Requirements in an EE
      • 27.3. Kitchen Equipment as Food Safety Hazard
    • Chapter 28: Design and construction of eating establishments for ensuring food safety
      • Abstract
      • 28.1. Obtaining Approval and Permit to Operate a Food Service
      • 28.2. Characteristics of Good Kitchen Design
      • 28.3. Internal Structures and Fittings
      • 28.4. Workspace Dimensions
      • 28.5. Construction Requirements
      • 28.6. Equipment Design and Installation
      • 28.7. Sinks
      • 28.8. Storage Space
      • 28.9. Grease Traps
      • 28.10. Pipe Work
      • 28.11. Gratings
      • 28.12. Waste Disposal Systems
      • 28.13. Ventilation
      • 28.14. Lighting
      • 28.15. Insect Control
      • 28.16. Basic Fire Precautions
      • 28.17. First-Aid Kits
      • 28.18. Conclusions
  • Section 7: Food safety in small eating establishments and in special situations
    • Chapter 29: Safe cooking practices and food safety in home kitchen and eating establishment
      • Abstract
      • 29.1. Safe Cooking Practices and Food Safety in Home Kitchen and Eating Establishemnt (EE)
    • Chapter 30: Food safety in schools, canteens, hostel messes, mid-day meal scheme, ICDS
      • Abstract
      • 30.1. General Principles of Food Safety for Community Eating Establishment (Gupta, 2009)
      • 30.2. Principles of Food Safety Specific to Various Community Eating Establishments/Programs
    • Chapter 31: Food safety issues related to street vendors
      • Abstract
      • 31.1. Definition of Street Food
      • 31.2. Increasing Trend of Street Foods
      • 31.3. Food Safety Hazards
      • 31.4. Food Safety Practices Pertaining to Street Foods and Their Health Implications
      • 31.5. Food Safety Regulatory Requirements
      • 31.6. Policy Issues for Provision of Safe Food
      • 31.7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 32: Food safety during travel
      • Abstract
      • 32.1. Introduction
      • 32.2. Food Borne Diseases
      • 32.3. Determinants of Food Safety During Travel
      • 32.4. Common Tips for Ensuring Food Safety in All Modes of Travel
      • 32.5. Mode of Travel
      • 32.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 33: Food safety during fairs and festivals
      • Abstract
      • 33.1. Introduction
      • 33.2. Food Safety Hazards During Fairs and Festivals
      • 33.3. Causes of Food Borne Illness During Fairs and Festivals
      • 33.4. Measures to Ensure Food Safety During Fairs and Festivals
      • 33.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 34: Food safety during disasters
      • Abstract
      • 34.1. Food Safety Advice
      • 34.2. Preparation for Food Safety Before a Disaster (WHO, 2015b)
      • 34.3. Principles of Feeding Programs During Disasters (UNHCR, 1999)
      • 34.4. Food Safety Measures in the Aftermath of Natural Disasters (WHO, 2015a)
      • 34.5. Conclusions
  • Section 8: Domestic regulatory scenario of food safety and interface of food safety laws, standards, regulations, and policies at the international level
    • Chapter 35: Relevant food safety regulations and policies
      • Abstract
      • 35.1. Introduction
      • 35.2. Evolution of Food Laws
      • 35.3. Indian Food Laws
      • 35.4. Food Safety Policies
      • 35.5. Procedure for Implementing Food Legislations/Instructions
      • 35.6. Registration of Petty FBOs
      • 35.7. Licensing of FBOs
      • 35.8. International Scenario on Food Safety
    • Chapter 36: Food safety policies in agriculture and food security with traceability
      • Abstract
      • 36.1. Introduction
      • 36.2. Has National Agricultural Policy Taken Care of “Food Safety”?
      • 36.3. Food Safety and Food Security as Part of National Agricultural Policy
      • 36.4. Traceability
    • Chapter 37: Food safety in international food trade—imports and exports
      • Abstract
      • 37.1. Introduction
      • 37.2. Principles and Guidelines of Inspection and Certification Systems for Imports and Exports
      • 37.3. Principles of Food Import and Export Inspection and Certification (CAC/GL 20, 1995)
      • 37.4. Guidelines
      • 37.5. Guidelines on Food Import-Control System
      • 37.6. Food Export-Control System
      • 37.7. Equivalence
      • 37.8. Inspections
      • 37.9. Certification Systems
      • 37.10. Conclusions
    • Chapter 38: Regulation of advertisement for food products in India—advertisement for food products
      • Abstract
      • 38.1. Introduction
      • 38.2. Advertisement Policies for Food Safety
      • 38.3. Food Safety Guidelines
      • 38.4. Food Safety and Standard Regulations (FSSR), 2011
      • 38.5. Jago Grahak Jago
      • 38.6. Who Can File a Complaint?
      • 38.7. How to File a Complaint?
      • 38.8. Where to File a Complaint?
      • 38.9. The Horlicks Controversy
      • 38.10. The Way Forward
      • 38.11. Conclusions
  • Section 9: Food safety concerns in context of newer developments in agriculture/food science/food processing
    • Chapter 39: Nutritional labeling
      • Abstract
      • 39.1. Introduction
      • 39.2. Nutrition Labeling as Per Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA) 2006
      • 39.3. Nutrition Facts Panel
      • 39.4. Ingredient List
      • 39.5. Nutrition Claims Versus Health Claims
      • 39.6. Other Claims
      • 39.7. Percentage (%) Daily Value
      • 39.8. Nutritional Information and Dietary Changes
      • 39.9. Nutrition Labels in Packaged Food: “Eat” in Between the Lines
      • 39.10. Conclusions
    • Chapter 40: Nutraceuticals
      • Abstract
      • 40.1. Introduction
      • 40.2. Nutraceutical
      • 40.3. Classification of Nutraceuticals
      • 40.4. Mode of Action of Nutraceuticals
      • 40.5. Benefits of Nutraceuticals
      • 40.6. Regulation Governing Nutraceuticals
      • 40.7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 41: Regulatory requirements for labeling, health, and nutritional claim
      • Abstract
      • 41.1. Introduction
      • 41.2. General Requirements for Mandatory Labeling
      • 41.3. Claims
      • 41.4. Prohibitions
      • 41.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 42: Genetically modified (GM) foods: the food security dilemma
      • Abstract
      • 42.1. Applications of GM Crops
      • 42.2. Pharming
      • 42.3. GM Crops in India
    • Chapter 43: Organic farming: is it a solution to safe food?
      • Abstract
      • 43.1. Introduction
      • 43.2. Definition of Organic Agriculture
      • 43.3. Adverse Effects of Modern Agricultural Practices: Indian Context
      • 43.4. Origin of Organic Farming
      • 43.5. The Concept of Food Quality and Food Safety
      • 43.6. Food Safety in Organic Agriculture: The Evidence
      • 43.7. Public Concern About Safe Food and its Quality
      • 43.8. Technique of Organic Farming
      • 43.9. Basic IFOAM Principles of Organic Farming: Complement to Food Safety
      • 43.10. Organic Agriculture: International Perspective
      • 43.11. Organic Farming at National Level
      • 43.12. Promotion of Organic Foods: What is Needed?
      • 43.13. Organic Food: Certification
      • 43.14. The Way Forward
    • Chapter 44: Safety and quality of frozen foods
      • Abstract
      • 44.1. Introduction
      • 44.2. Food Spoilage/Deterioration Leading to Unsafe and/or Poor Quality Food
      • 44.3. Methods of Food Preservation for Enhancing Shelf Life of Food
      • 44.4. Freezing as a Method of Food Preservation
      • 44.5. Methods of Thawing
      • 44.6. Safety and Quality of Frozen Foods
      • 44.7. Moisture Loss/Freezing Injury
      • 44.8. Microbial Growth in the Freezer
      • 44.9. Effect on Nutrient Value of Frozen Foods
      • 44.10. Effect of Thawing on Safety and Quality of Food
      • 44.11. Conclusions
    • Chapter 45: Ready to eat meals
      • Abstract
      • 45.1. Introduction
      • 45.2. History
      • 45.3. The Indian Setting
      • 45.4. Limitations
      • 45.5. Classification
      • 45.6. Safety Aspects of REM Foods
      • 45.7. Detection of the Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria
      • 45.8. Food Safety Concern for Some Specific REM
      • 45.9. Conclusions
    • Chapter 46: Food packaging
      • Abstract
      • 46.1. Introduction
      • 46.2. History
      • 46.3. Why Food Packaging?
      • 46.4. Principles of Packaging
      • 46.5. Packaging and Food Safety
      • 46.6. Packaging Material
      • 46.7. Types of Packaging
      • 46.8. Packaging Materials
      • 46.9. Labeling
      • 46.10. Toxic Effects
      • 46.11. Emerging Trends
      • 46.12. Conclusions
    • Chapter 47: Information technology (IT) in food safety
      • Abstract
      • 47.1. Where are We?
      • 47.2. Where IT Comes in?
      • 47.3. Prerequsites of IT System
      • 47.4. Present Usage of IT in Food Safety: Developing Countries
      • 47.5. IT in Food Safety: Developed Countries
      • 47.6. Cyber Security in Food Safety (Straka, 2014)
      • 47.7. Limitations of IT
      • 47.8. Future of IT in Food Safety
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
624
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128018460
Paperback ISBN:
9780128017739

About the Editor

Puja Dudeja

Dr Puja Dudeja is Assistant Professor in Armed Forces Medical college, Pune, India and holds Ph D in Community Nutrition. He is recipient of various research awards (6) and has authored books (02), chapters (84) and research articles (18).

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, India

Rajul Gupta

Dr. Rajul Kumar Gupta is Director of the Armed Forces Medical Health Service Ministry of Defense in New Delhi, India and holds a PhD in Applied Nutrition. He is Expert Consultant to India for National Disaster Management, and special duty officer to the Prime Minister’s National Council on malnutrition. He has published more than 70 papers and chapters and has authored/edited six books, including for the WHO and Health Ministry. He is a standing member of UN's Standing Committee on Nutrition and UN’s expert groups on Nutrition & Non-Communicable Diseases and Nutrition & Global Climatic Change.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Community Medicine, Army College of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Amarjeet Singh Minhas

Dr. Amarjeet Singh Minhas has been a faculty in department of Community Medicine for more than 27 years at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh,India. As a professor in the department he has guided 5 PhD, 10 MD and 30 masters level dissertations.Five of these were related to Food Safety. He serves on the Food Safety Committee of the institute.He has been he Principal Investigator for more than 52 research projects. He has published more than 160 research articles and 50 book chapters.He hasalso edited 3 books and coauthored more than 15 booklets.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Community Medicine,School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India