Fluvial-Tidal Sedimentology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444635297, 9780444635396

Fluvial-Tidal Sedimentology, Volume 68

1st Edition

Series Volume Editors: Philip Ashworth James Best Daniel Parsons
eBook ISBN: 9780444635396
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444635297
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 23rd November 2015
Page Count: 656
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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part 1: Context
    • Chapter 1: Deciphering the relative importance of fluvial and tidal processes in the fluvial–marine transition
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Process Framework for the Fluvial–Tidal Transition
      • 1.3 Setting of the Case Studies Used in This Chapter
      • 1.4 Description and Interpretation of the Case Studies
      • 1.5 Discussion
      • 1.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
  • Part 2: Modern
    • Chapter 2: Estuarine turbidity maxima revisited: Instrumental approaches, remote sensing, modeling studies, and new directions
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 In Situ Measurements: Recent Advances
      • 2.3 Building an Integral Understanding of ETM via Remote Sensing: Possibilities and Challenges
      • 2.4 ETM Dynamic: Insights from Theory, Modeling and Observations
      • 2.5 Discussion: Toward a More Complete Understanding of ETM Dynamics
      • 2.6 Summary and Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 3: Sedimentological trends across the tidal–fluvial transition, Fraser River, Canada: A review and some broader implications
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Depositional Trends Across the TFT of the Fraser River
      • 3.3 The Broader Implications of Depositional Trends from the Lower Fraser River
      • 3.4 Conclusions
    • Chapter 4: Three-dimensional meander bend flow within the tidally influenced fluvial zone
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Methods
      • 4.3 Results
      • 4.4 Discussion
      • 4.5 Conclusions
    • Chapter 5: Sedimentology of a tidal point-bar within the fluvial–tidal transition: River Severn Estuary, UK
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Severn Estuary
      • 5.3 Methods
      • 5.4 Results
      • 5.5 Discussion
      • 5.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
  • Part 3: Ancient
    • Chapter 6: Mid to late Holocene geomorphological and sedimentological evolution of the fluvial–tidal zone: Lower Columbia River, WA/OR, USA
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Background
      • 6.3 Methodologies
      • 6.4 Results
      • 6.5 Discussion
      • 6.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 7: Palaeo-Orinoco (Pliocene) channels on the tide-dominated Morne L'Enfer delta lobes and estuaries, SW Trinidad
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Geological Background
      • 7.3 Palaeo-Orinoco Context of Tidal–Fluvial Channels
      • 7.4 Criteria for the Recognition of Tidal Signals in and Around the Channels
      • 7.5 Examples of Palaeo-Orinoco Tidal–Fluvial Channels
      • 7.6 Discussion
      • 7.7 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 8: The ichnology of the fluvial–tidal transition: Interplay of ecologic and evolutionary controls
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Ecologic Controls on the Ichnofauna at the Fluvial–Tidal Zone: Insights from Neoichnology
      • 8.3 Case Studies
      • 8.4 Summary of Observations and Discussion: Ecologic and Evolutionary Controls
      • 8.5 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 9: A reappraisal of large, heterolithic channel fills in the upper Permian Rangal Coal Measures of the Bowen Basin, Queensland, Australia: The case for tidal influence
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Geological Setting
      • 9.3 Previous Research
      • 9.4 Facies Analysis
      • 9.5 Evidence for Tidal Influence
      • 9.6 Discussion
      • 9.7 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 10: Facies and architecture of unusual fluvial–tidal channels with inclined heterolithic strata: Campanian Neslen Formation, Utah, USA
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Regional Geology and Previous Work
      • 10.3 Methods and Data
      • 10.4 Results
      • 10.5 Discussion
      • 10.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 11: Geologic reservoir characterization of Carboniferous fluvio-tidal deposits of the Illinois Basin, USA
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Geologic Setting
      • 11.3 Methodology: Characterization of the Bridgeport Reservoirs
      • 11.4 Sedimentology of the Bridgeport Sandstone Reservoirs
      • 11.5 Facies Associations of the Bridgeport Sandstones
      • 11.6 Depositional Model of the Bridgeport B Interval
      • 11.7 Fluvial–tidal Transition Zone
      • 11.8 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 12: Fluvial to tidal transition zone facies in the McMurray Formation (Christina River, Alberta, Canada), with emphasis on the reflection of flow intensity in bottomset architecture
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Location and Stratigraphy
      • 12.3 General Depositional Setting
      • 12.4 Methods
      • 12.5 Facies Analysis
      • 12.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
  • Part 4: Resources
    • Chapter 13: Recognition and prediction of petroleum reservoirs in the fluvial/tidal transition
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Tidal Recognition Criteria
      • 13.3 Tidal Reservoirs Within Incised Valley Fills
      • 13.4 Tidal Delta Reservoirs
      • 13.5 Predicting the Distribution of Tidal Facies
      • 13.6 Summary
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 14: Characterizing alluvial architecture of point bars within the McMurray Formation, Alberta, Canada, for improved bitumen resource prediction and recovery
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Regional Geology and Background
      • 14.3 Bitumen Production Technologies
      • 14.4 Surface Mining and Pay Definition
      • 14.5 SAGD Process and Steam Chamber Definition
      • 14.6 Linking Point Bar Lithofacies Schemes to Resource Quality
      • 14.7 Mud Clast Lithofacies
      • 14.8 Medium- to Coarse-Grained Cross-Stratified Sand (Ss1) Lithofacies
      • 14.9 Interbedded Very-Fine- to Fine-Grained Massive to Ripple-Laminated (Ss2) Lithofacies
      • 14.10 Sand with Mud Interbeds (IBS, IB, IBM) Lithofacies
      • 14.11 Mudstone Lithofacies
      • 14.12 Characterizing Resource Quality Within Point Bar Deposits
      • 14.13 High-Quality Point Bar Reservoir Deposits
      • 14.14 Low-Quality Reservoir and Nonreservoir Point Bar Deposits
      • 14.15 Resource Continuity in Point Bar Deposits
      • 14.16 Evaluating In Situ Resources Through Time
      • 14.17 Opportunity Identification and High Grading (T1)
      • 14.18 Project Scale Definition and Initial Development Area Selection (T2)
      • 14.19 Detailed Resource Definition and Development Planning (T3)
      • 14.20 Early- to Late-Life Production
      • 14.21 Evaluating Mining Resources
      • 14.22 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 15: The Cretaceous McMurray oil sands, Alberta, Canada: A world-class, tidally influenced fluvial–estuarine system—An Alberta government perspective
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Geologic Setting
      • 15.3 Previous Work
      • 15.4 Wabiskaw–McMurray Stratigraphic Nomenclature
      • 15.5 McMurray Formation: Facies Definition, Models, and Associations
      • 15.6 McMurray Formation: Tidal Signatures
      • 15.7 McMurray Formation: Modern Analogs
      • 15.8 McMurray Formation: Summary and Implications for Reservoir Development
      • Acknowledgments
      • Appendix A Alberta Township Survey System
      • Appendix B Definition of Stratigraphic Markers (“picks”) with Quality Codes (Modified from Wynne et al., 1994; Hein et al., 2000)
      • Appendix C Characteristics of Different Stratigraphic Units Within the McMurray Formation Used in the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (2003) Regional Geological Model (Hein et al., 2013c)

Description

Fluvial-Tidal Sedimentology provides information on the ‘Tidal-Fluvial Transition', the transition zone between river and tidal environments, and includes contributions that address some of the most fundamental research questions, including how the morphology of the tidal-fluvial transition zone evolves over short (days) and long (decadal) time periods and for different tidal and fluvial regimes, the structure of the river flow as it varies in its magnitude over tidal currents and how this changes at the mixing interface between fresh and saline water and at the turbidity maximum, the role of suspended sediment in controlling bathymetric change and bar growth and the role of fine-grained sediment (muds and flocs), whether it is possible to differentiate between ‘fluvial’ and ‘tidally’ influenced bedforms as preserved in bars and within the adjacent floodplain and what are the diagnostic sedimentary facies of tidal-fluvial deposits and how are these different from ‘pure’ fluvial and tidal deposits, amongst other topics.

The book presents the latest research on the processes and deposits of the tidal-fluvial transition, documenting recent major field programs that have quantified the flow, sediment transport, and bed morphology in tidal-fluvial zones. It uses description of contemporary environments and ancient outcrop analogues to characterize the facies change through the tidal-fluvial transition.

Key Features

  • Presents the latest outcomes from recent, large, integrated field programs in estuaries around the world
  • Gives detailed field descriptions (outcrop, borehole, core, contemporary sediments) of tidal-fluvial deposits
  • Accesses new models and validation datasets for estuarine processes and deposits
  • Presents descriptions of contemporary environments and ancient outcrop analogues to characterize the facies change through the tidal-fluvial transition

Readership

Academic and industrial geoscientists, as well as researchers in the global hydrocarbon industry


Details

No. of pages:
656
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780444635396
Hardcover ISBN:
9780444635297

Ratings and Reviews


About the Series Volume Editors

Philip Ashworth Series Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Brighton, UK

James Best Series Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Illinois, Champaign IL, USA

Daniel Parsons Series Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Hull, UK