Description

The value of the editor’s craft to a finished film cannot be underestimated, and it’s no surprise that directors rely heavily on the same editor again and again. This book employs stills and screenshots to show how an editor created a scene with the filmmaker and explores the complex relationship between a director who has just shot a movie and the editor who must complete the director’s vision. Includes perspectives from Dylan Tichenor who has worked on Boogie Nights, Brokeback Mountain, There Will Be Blood and many others and Pietro Scalia, the great editor whose partners include Bertolucci, Van San, and Ridley Scott.

Each book in the FilmCraft Series focuses on a specific aspect of the filmmaking process, presenting a visually strunning look at the subject through the eyes of notable professionals in each field. Each book offers deep insight into the working practices of the world’s most distinguished professionals, covering their inspiration, collaboration, and work on set. Each professional has been interviewed exclusively, and goes into detail on specific scenes in their films to give concrete examples of their craft. The result is to provide readers with a fascinating inside look at the filmmaking art, and a wealth of knowledge that they can apply to their own work.

Key Features

  • Discussions with the world’s most notable editors, such the Oscar-winning editors of The Social Network.
  • Sidebars featuring practical advice on topics that filmmakers can apply to their own work
  • Interview-based format with perspectives from the greats appeals to non-practitioner film lovers

Readership

Editors and filmmakers, film buffs, and film theorists/critics

Details

No. of pages:
192
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2012
Published:
Imprint:
Focal Press
Print ISBN:
9780240818641
Electronic ISBN:
9780240818658

About the author

Justin Chang

Justin Chang is senior film critic at Variety, editing and overseeing the paper's film reviews. He currently serves as secretary of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. He holds a journalism degree from USC. Before joining Variety in 2004, he was a freelance entertainment writer for the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times.

Affiliations and Expertise

Justin Chang is senior film critic at Variety, editing and overseeing the paper's film reviews. He currently serves as secretary of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. He holds a journalism degree from USC. Before joining Variety in 2004, he was a freelance entertainment writer for the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times.

Reviews

"In his introduction Chang explains how the editor ‘maximizes the impact’ of all other filmic elements, trailing only the director in shaping how a movie looks and feels. (Check the Oscar track record for how seldom a movie wins Best Picture without its editing receiving acknowledgment as well). Again, twenty-one artists are profiled, with copious photographic examples from each. Among the subjects are Dede Allen, Walter Murch (also a crack sound designer), and Lee Smith…  These books are a godsend for anyone curious about how movies are put together without necessarily wanting to go out and make movies. They're perfect examples of informed cinephilia."--DallasNews.com

"Again, while Film Craft: Editing is not a textbook, it gives so many hints and tips on how many of the top editors of the industry think and work, one can glean remarkable insights from their experiences. What comes out from the interviews are candid stories of experiences from different film projects. Most of all the sheer enthusiasm and love of film and their art of editing bursts from the page."--Impulsegamer

"FilmCraft is a new series from Focal Press that deconstructs the art of cinema by studying it from the inside. Each volume in the collection focuses on a different aspect of film production by gathering interviews with master craftsmen, who are able to relay a lifetime of experience in a series of intimate and informal conversations. The first two installments, Editing (Justin Chang) and Cinematography (Mike Goodridge and Tim Grierson), set a high bar for future volumes and are easily recommended sources of information and understanding… Editing and Cinematography are both highly recommended reading for anyone who enjoys movies and has an interest in learning more about the process. There is nothing here that feels like a textbook, but the insight provided within can be held up ag