Fibre-Rich and Wholegrain Foods - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857090386, 9780857095787

Fibre-Rich and Wholegrain Foods

1st Edition

Improving Quality

Editors: Jan Delcour Kaisa Poutanen
eBook ISBN: 9780857095787
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857090386
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 26th March 2013
Page Count: 496
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Table of Contents

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Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition

Part I: Introductory issues

Chapter 1: Definitions, regulations and health claims associated with dietary fibre and wholegrain foods

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Defining dietary fibre and wholegrain

1.3 Analysing the dietary fibre and wholegrain content of food

1.4 Labelling

1.5 Recommendations and guidelines for dietary fibre and wholegrain intake

1.6 Health claims for dietary fibre and wholegrain

Chapter 2: Dietary fibre analysis in foods

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 An integrated procedure for the measurement of total dietary fibre, including resistant starch and non-digestible oligosaccharides

2.3 Updates of the original integrated total dietary fibre procedure

2.4 Interlaboratory evaluation of integrated total dietary fibre procedures

2.5 Progress in acceptance of dietary fibre methodology by Codex Alimentarius

Chapter 3: Health aspects of dietary fibre

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Fibre: definitions, measurement and intake

3.3 Characterization and digestive impact of fibre

3.4 Dietary fibre (DF) and disease

3.5 Fibre and obesity

3.6 Dietary fibre (DF) and microbiota

3.7 Future trends

Chapter 4: Wholegrain foods and health

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Epidemiological studies

4.3 Human interventions

4.4 Food factors important for the health effects of wholegrain foods

4.5 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 5: The range of dietary fibre ingredients and a comparison of their technical functionality

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Technical functionalities of dietary fibre ingredients

5.3 Insoluble dietary fibre ingredients

5.4 Soluble high molecular weight dietary fibre ingredients

5.5 Soluble low molecular weight dietary fibre ingredients

5.6 Resistant starch

5.7 Conclusion

Chapter 6: Consumption and consumer challenges of wholegrain foods

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Whole grain and fiber consumption

6.3 Wholegrain foods and consumer challenges: internal (personal) factors

6.4 Wholegrain foods and consumer challenges: external factors

6.5 Approaches to introducing wholegrain foods

6.6 Future trends

6.7 Sources of further information and advice

Part II: Dietary fibre sources

Chapter 7: Improving the content and composition of dietary fibre in wheat

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Fibre content and composition of wheat fractions

7.3 Genetic variation in arabinoxylan (AX) amount, structure and composition

7.4 Specific effects of agronomy and environment on arabinoxylan (AX) and β-glucan content and composition

7.5 Heritability and genetic analysis of arabinoxylan (AX) and β-glucan content

7.6 Exploitation of genetic variation in grain dietary fibre in plant breeding

7.7 Conclusion

7.8 Acknowledgements

Chapter 8: Cereal brans as dietary fibre ingredients

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Cereal cell walls as dietary fibre

8.3 Cereal bran production technology

8.4 Technologies to improve the properties of cereal brans as source of dietary fibre

8.5 Food applications of cereal fibre ingredients

8.6 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 9: Vegetable, fruit and potato fibres

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Fruits and vegetables as sources of dietary fibre

9.3 Effects of processing on fruit and vegetable dietary fibre

9.4 Conclusion

Part III: Improving the quality of fibre-rich and wholegrain foods: cereal products

Chapter 10: Fibre-enriched and wholegrain breads

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Fibre enrichment of breads

10.3 Processing

10.4 Properties of dietary fibre-enriched dough and breads

10.5 Conclusion

Chapter 11: Performance of resistant starches in baking: a case study on fibre-rich and wholegrain muffins

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Muffin batter

11.3 Muffin properties

11.4 Sensory shelf life of muffins

11.5 Sensory characteristics of muffins

11.6 Conclusion

11.7 Acknowledgements

Chapter 12: Fibre in extruded products

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Extrusion cooking

12.3 Effects of dietary fibre (DF) on the extrusion process and product quality

12.4 Effects of extrusion on dietary fibre (DF) properties

12.5 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 13: Fibre-enriched and whole wheat pasta

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Process variables affecting pasta production

13.3 Enrichment of pasta with whole grains or dietary fibre

13.4 Relationship between ingredient selection, processing and nutrition

13.5 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 14: Fibre-enriched and whole wheat noodles

Abstract:

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Noodle quality attributes

14.3 Wholewheat noodles

14.4 Fiber-enriched wheat flour noodles

14.5 Wheat flour noodles and resistant starch

14.6 Wholegrain and fiber-enriched noodles from other botanical sources

14.7 Conclusion

Part IV: Improving the quality of fibre-enriched foods: other products

Chapter 15: Fibre-enriched dairy products

Abstract:

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Dairy product categories and formulations

15.3 Challenges of fibre enrichment

15.4 Potential dietary fibre supplements for dairy products

15.5 Potential product applications

15.6 Future trends

Chapter 16: Fibre-enriched meat products

Abstract:

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Strategies for the development of healthier meat products

16.3 Fibre as an ingredient in meat product formulation

16.4 Dietary fibre in meat products

16.5 Future trends

16.6 Acknowledgements

Chapter 17: Fibre-enriched seafood

Abstract:

17.1 Introduction

17.2 Fortification with dietary fibres of aquatic origin

17.3 Fortification with dietary fibres of terrestrial origin

17.4 Conclusion

17.5 Future trends

17.6 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 18: Fibre-enriched beverages

Abstract:

18.1 Introduction

18.2 Adding fibres into drinks

18.3 Types of fibres suitable for fortifying non-dairy drinks: gums and beta-glucans

18.4 Types of fibres suitable for fortifying non-dairy drinks: fructans and glucose products

18.5 Typical beverage formulations containing fibre

18.6 Troubleshooting

18.7 Future trends

Chapter 19: Fibre-enriched snack foods

Abstract:

19.1 Introduction

19.2 Extrusion processing of ready-to-eat snacks

19.3 Nutritional benefits of extruded whole grains

19.4 Cereal by-products as a new source of dietary fibre

19.5 Improving the quality of extruded products

19.6 Conclusion

19.7 Future trends

Chapter 20: Companion animal nutrition as affected by dietary fibre inclusion

Abstract:

20.1 Introduction

20.2 Effects of dietary fibre on food intake and gastric and small intestinal function in companion animals

20.3 Effects of dietary fibre on intestinal function of companion animals

20.4 Clinical significance of dietary fibres in companion animal diets

20.5 Strategies for incorporating fibre into companion animal diets

20.6 Conclusion

Chapter 21: Soluble and insoluble fibre in infant nutrition

Abstract:

21.1 Introduction

21.2 Non-digestible carbohydrates in human milk

21.3 Soluble non-digestible carbohydrates of non-human milk origin

21.4 Insoluble non-digestible carbohydrates

21.5 Conclusion

Index


Description

Consumers are increasingly seeking foods that are rich in dietary fibre and wholegrains, but are often unwilling to compromise on sensory quality. Fibre-rich and wholegrain food reviews key research and best industry practice in the development of fibre-enriched and wholegrain products that efficiently meet customer requirements.

Part one introduces the key issues surrounding the analysis, definition, regulation and health claims associated with dietary fibre and wholegrain foods. The links between wholegrain foods and health, the range of fibre dietary ingredients and a comparison of their technical functionality are discussed, as are consumption and consumer challenges of wholegrain foods. Part two goes on to explore dietary fibre sources, including wheat and non-wheat cereal dietary fibre ingredients, vegetable, fruit and potato fibres. Improving the quality of fibre-rich and wholegrain foods, including such cereal products as wholegrain bread, muffins, pasta and noodles, is the focus of part three. Fibre in extruded products is also investigated before part four reviews quality improvement of fibre-enriched dairy products, meat products, seafood, beverages and snack foods. Companion animal nutrition as affected by dietary fibre inclusion is discussed, before the book concludes with a consideration of soluble and insoluble fibre in infant nutrition.

With its distinguished editors and international team of expert contributors, Fibre-rich and wholegrain foods provides a comprehensive guide to the field for researchers working in both the food industry and academia, as well as all those involved in the development, production and use of fibre-enriched and wholegrain foods.

Key Features

  • Reviews key research and best industry practice in the development of fibre-enriched and wholegrain products
  • Considers analysis, definition, regulation and health claims associated with dietary fibre and wholegrain foods
  • Explores sources of dietary fibre including: wheat and non-wheat cereal, vegetable, fruit and potato fibres

Readership

Researchers (both in the food industry and academia); Those in R&D at companies which produce fiber-enriched and whole grain foods


Details

No. of pages:
496
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2013
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857095787
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857090386

Reviews

The publication of this book is extremely timely. …It has great reference value because it covers all the relevant dietary fibre sources and deals with how foods can be enriched with fibre. [It is] a very valuable reference, which will surely be the standard work in this area for some time., Bioactive Polysaccharides and Dietary Fibre
It is a very valuable reference, which will surely be the standard work in this area for some time., Bioactive Polysaccharides and Dietary Fibre


About the Editors

Jan Delcour Editor

Jan Delcour is Professor and Head of the Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry and Chairman of Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Centre (LFoRCe) at KU Leuven, Belgium.

Affiliations and Expertise

KU Leuven, Belgium

Kaisa Poutanen Editor

Kaisa Poutanen is Research Professor and Project Leader of the GRAINITY project at VTT, Finland.

Affiliations and Expertise

VTT, Finland