Feed and Feeding Practices in Aquaculture - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081005064, 9780081005071

Feed and Feeding Practices in Aquaculture

1st Edition

Editors: D Allen Davis
eBook ISBN: 9780081005071
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081005064
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 1st June 2015
Page Count: 432
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Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Part One. Feed and fertiliser in aquaculture: an overview
    • 1. Overview of aquaculture feeds: global impacts of ingredient use
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Feed ingredients
      • 1.3. Land use for plant-based ingredients
      • 1.4. Fish meal and oil
      • 1.5. Energy and carbon emissions
      • 1.6. Water use
      • 1.7. Water pollution
      • 1.8. Conclusions
    • 2. Fertilizers in aquaculture
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Pond natural food web
      • 2.3. Nutrients and forms in water
      • 2.4. Liming
      • 2.5. Chemical fertilizers
      • 2.6. Organic fertilizers
      • 2.7. Solubility of chemical fertilizer
      • 2.8. Fertilization frequency
      • 2.9. Fertilization regimes
      • 2.10. Future trends
      • 2.11. Sources of further information
    • 3. Nutritional requirements of cultured fish: formulating nutritionally adequate feeds
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Nutrient requirements of fish
      • 3.3. Feed ingredients
      • 3.4. Theory behind feed formulation
      • 3.5. Conclusions
    • 4. Complete feeds—intensive systems
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Concept and importance
      • 4.3. Meeting dietary requirements
      • 4.4. Feed formulation
      • 4.5. Future trends
      • 4.6. Sources of further information
    • 5. Regulatory aspects of compound feed in aquaculture
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Sovereign feed legislative regulations
      • 5.3. Voluntary standards for feed manufacturers
      • 5.4. Voluntary standards for ingredient manufacturers
      • 5.5. Organic feed standards
      • 5.6. Future trends
  • Part Two. Feed ingredients, production and processing
    • 6. Quality control of feed ingredients for aquaculture
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Sampling
      • 6.3. Ingredient specifications and certificate of analysis
      • 6.4. Quality examinations
      • 6.5. Adulteration of ingredients and test methods
      • 6.6. Quality monitoring
      • 6.7. Managing quality problem of ingredients
      • 6.8. Laboratory requirements
      • 6.9. Future directions for quality control
      • 6.10. Conclusions
    • 7. Additives in aquafeed: an overview
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Feeding stimulants and palatability enhancers
      • 7.3. Antioxidants
      • 7.4. Color/pigmentation agents
      • 7.5. Antimicrobial agents
      • 7.6. Organic acids
      • 7.7. Immunostimulating agents
      • 7.8. Enzymes and hormones
      • 7.9. Future research and trends
      • 7.10. Concluding remarks
    • 8. Replacing fishmeal and fish oil in industrial aquafeeds for carnivorous fish
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Fishmeal sparing in aquafeeds
      • 8.3. Fish oil sparing in aquafeeds
      • 8.4. Conclusions
    • 9. Use of pre- and probiotics in finfish aquaculture
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Prebiotics
      • 9.3. Probiotics
      • 9.4. Combined effects of pre- and probiotics
      • 9.5. Conclusions and future direction
    • 10. Safety of medical feed additives in the food chain
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Overview of per oral drugs used in aquaculture
      • 10.3. Safety of per oral medicals in farmed aquatic organisms
      • 10.4. Consumer safety
      • 10.5. Environmental safety of per oral drugs in fish farming
      • 10.6. Legislation, monitoring and control
      • 10.7. Future trends
      • 10.8. Sources of further information and advice
    • 11. Using feed to enhance the color quality of fish and crustaceans
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Color as a sensory quality trait in seafood and aquatic ornamental organisms
      • 11.3. Feed as a source of color in aquaculture organisms
      • 11.4. Pigmentation via aquaculture feed
      • 11.5. Regulatory context
      • 11.6. Future trends with carotenoids
      • 11.7. Sources of further information and advice
    • 12. Storage and handling of feeds for fish and shrimp
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Storage
      • 12.3. Handling
      • 12.4. Summary
  • Part Three. Feeding strategies and environmental impact
    • 13. Feeding in hatcheries
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Nutritional physiology of larval and early juvenile fish
      • 13.3. Live feeds
      • 13.4. Manufactured feeds
      • 13.5. Hatchery feeding regimes
      • 13.6. Future trends
      • 13.7. Summary
      • 13.8. Source of further information and advice
    • 14. Feeding equipment
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Why not continue with hand feeding?
      • 14.3. Automatic feeding requires input—feeding concepts
      • 14.4. Control over fish biomass, a need when utilizing feeding tables to control feeding
      • 14.5. The feeding line
      • 14.6. Feed type versus feeding system
      • 14.7. Systems for feeding of live feed
      • 14.8. Formulate feed, feed composition, and particle size
      • 14.9. Feeding systems for formulated feeds
      • 14.10. New trends
      • 14.11. What about the future feeding system?
    • 15. Environmental impact of phosphorus and nitrogen from aquaculture
      • 15.1. Overview of the problem
      • 15.2. How do pollutants (N and P) enter the water?
      • 15.3. Nitrogen and phosphorus losses from aquaculture
      • 15.4. Measures suggested/use to overcome the problem
      • 15.5. Conclusions
  • Future trends
  • Index

Description

Feed and fertilizer are significant costs in aquaculture operations and play an important role in the successful production of fish and other seafood for human consumption. This book reviews the key properties of feeds, advances in feed formulation and ingredient choices and the practicalities of feeding systems and strategies.

Feed and Feeding Practices in Aquaculture provides an authoritative and comprehensive coverage of the topic and is an essential guide for nutritionists, farm owners and technicians in aquaculture, as well as those working in R&D in the feed production industry and academics/postgraduate students with an interest in the area.

Key Features

  • Reviews the key properties of aquafeed, advances in feed formulation and manufacturing techniques, and the practicalities of feeding systems and strategies
  • Provides an overview of feed and fertilizer in aquaculture
  • Covers feeding strategies and related issues in different areas of aquaculture

Readership

Nutritionists, farm owners and technicians in aquaculture, as well as those working in R&D in the feed production industry and academics/postgraduate students with a research interest in the area.


Details

No. of pages:
432
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081005071
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081005064

Reviews

"...many chapters also include a section on sources for further information...a useful reference for anyone working in the field of aquaculture nutrition." --Aquaculture Magazine

Ratings and Reviews


About the Editors

D Allen Davis Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Dept. of Fisheries and Allied Aquaculture, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA