Exploring Engineering - 4th Edition - ISBN: 9780128012420, 9780128025888

Exploring Engineering

4th Edition

An Introduction to Engineering and Design

Authors: Philip Kosky Robert Balmer William Keat George Wise
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128012420
eBook ISBN: 9780128025888
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 25th June 2015
Page Count: 552
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Description

Exploring Engineering, Fourth Edition: An Introduction to Engineering and Design, winner of a 2017 Textbook Excellence Award (Texty), presents the emerging challenges engineers face in a wide range of areas as they work to help improve our quality of life. In this classic textbook, the authors explain what engineers actually do, from the fundamental principles that form the basis of their work to the application of that knowledge within a structured design process. The text itself is organized into three parts: Lead-On, Minds-On, Hands-On. This organization allows the authors to give a basic introduction to engineering methods, then show the application of these principles and methods, and finally present a design challenge. This book is an ideal introduction for anyone interested in exploring the various fields of engineering and learning how engineers work to solve problems.

Key Features

  • Winner of a 2017 Textbook Excellence Award (Texty) from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association
  • NEW: Chapters on Aeronautical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Design Teams
  • NEW: Expanded content in the chapters "Defining the Problem," "Generation of 'Alternative Concepts'," and "Detailed Design"
  • NEW: Material on sustainability issues in engineering
  • Introduces students to the engineering profession, emphasizing the fundamental physical, chemical, and material bases for all engineering work
  • Includes an Engineering Ethics Decision Matrix used throughout the book to pose ethical challenges and explore decision-making in an engineering context
  • Lists of "Top Engineering Achievements" and "Top Engineering Challenges" help put the material in context and show engineering as a vibrant discipline involved in solving societal problems
  • Companion Web site includes links to several new drawing supplements, including "Free-hand Engineering Sketching," (detailed instructions on free-hand engineering sketching); "AutoCAD Introduction," (an introduction to the free AutoCAD drawing software); and "Design Projects," (new freshman-level design projects that complement the "Hands-On" part of the textbook).

Readership

Freshman undergraduate students entering 4-year engineering programs, including those with declared or intended majors in all engineering areas such as mechanical, electrical, chemical, industrial, and civil engineering. Freshman undergraduate students who are taking an Introduction to Engineering Course either as a requirement for a technical degree or as an elective for science and technology requirements for other degree programs in liberal arts, business, life sciences, and so forth.

Table of Contents

  • Epigraph
  • Preface
    • 1 The Structure of This Text
  • Acknowledgments
  • Part 1: Lead-On
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 1: What Engineers Do
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 What is Engineering?
      • 1.3 What Do Engineers Do?
      • 1.4 Where Do Engineers Work?
      • 1.5 What is Engineering Technology?
      • 1.6 What Makes a “Good” Engineer?
      • 1.7 What This Book Covers
      • 1.8 Personal and Professional Ethics
      • 1.9 What Are Professional Ethics?
      • 1.10 Engineering Ethics Decision Matrix
      • 1.11 What Should You Expect From This Book?
      • Summary
      • Exercises
      • Final Thoughts
    • Chapter 2: Elements of Engineering Analysis
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Engineering Drawing and Sketching
      • 2.3 Engineering Variables
      • 2.4 Engineering Units of Measurement
      • 2.5 Significant Figures
      • 2.6 The “Need-Know-How-Solve” Method
      • 2.7 Spreadsheet Analysis
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 3: Force and Motion
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 What is a Force?
      • 3.3 Newton's First Law
      • 3.4 Newton's Second Law
      • 3.5 Newton's Third Law
      • 3.6 Free-Body Diagrams
      • 3.7 What is Kinematics?
      • 3.8 The Equations of One-Dimensional Kinematics
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 4: Energy
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Energy is the Ability to do Work
      • 4.3 Kinds of Energy
      • 4.4 Energy Conversion
      • 4.5 Conservation of Energy
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 5: Engineering Economics
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Why is Economics Important?
      • 5.3 The Cost of Money
      • 5.4 When is an Investment Worth it?
      • Summary
      • Exercises
  • Part 2: Minds-On
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 6: Aeronautical Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Airfoils and Lift
      • 6.3 The Algebra of Imaginary Numbers
      • 6.4 Conformal Mapping
      • 6.5 The Joukowski Airfoil Theory
      • 6.6 The Kutta Condition
      • 6.7 Symmetric Airfoils
      • 6.8 Major Factors in Aircraft Economy
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 7: Chemical Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Chemical Energy Conversion
      • 7.3 Atoms, Molecules, and Chemical Reactions
      • 7.4 The mol and the kmol
      • 7.5 Stoichiometry
      • 7.6 The Heating Value of Hydrocarbon Fuels
      • 7.7 Chemical Engineering: How Do You Make Chemical Fuels?
      • 7.8 Modern Chemical Engineering
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 8: Civil Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 What Do Civil Engineers Do?
      • 8.3 Structural Engineering
      • 8.4 Geotechnical Engineering
      • 8.5 Water Resources Engineering
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 9: Computer Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Moore’s Law
      • 9.3 Analog Computers
      • 9.4 From Analog to Digital Computing
      • 9.5 Binary Logic
      • 9.6 Truth Tables
      • 9.7 Decimal and Binary Numbers
      • 9.8 Binary Arithmetic
      • 9.9 Binary Codes
      • 9.10 How Does a Computer Work?
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 10: Electrical Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Electrical Circuits
      • 10.3 Resistance, Ohm's Law, and the “Power Law”
      • 10.4 Series and Parallel Circuits
      • 10.5 Kirchhoff's Laws
      • 10.6 Switches
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 11: Industrial Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Manufacturing and Quality Control
      • 11.3 Methods Engineering
      • 11.4 Simulation Analysis and Operation Research
      • 11.5 Ergonomics
      • 11.6 Material Handling
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 12: Manufacturing Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 What Is Manufacturing?
      • 12.3 Early Manufacturing
      • 12.4 Industrial Revolution
      • 12.5 Manufacturing Processes
      • 12.6 Modern Manufacturing
      • 12.7 Variability and Six Sigma
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 13: Materials Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Choosing the Right Material
      • 13.3 Strength
      • 13.4 Defining Materials Requirements
      • 13.5 Materials Selection
      • 13.6 Properties of Modern Materials
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 14: Mechanical Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Mechanical Engineering
      • 14.3 The Elements of Thermal Design
      • 14.4 The Elements of Machine Design
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 15: Nuclear Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Nuclear Power Reactors
      • 15.3 Neutron Moderation
      • 15.4 How Does a Nuclear Reactor Work?
      • 15.5 The Four Factor Formula
      • 15.6 Fission Products and Nuclear Waste
      • 15.7 Is Nuclear Power a Viable Renewable Energy Source?
      • Summary
      • Exercises
  • Part 2.1: Emerging Engineering Fields
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 16: Bioengineering
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 What Do Bioengineers Do?
      • 16.3 Biological Implications of Injuries to the Head
      • 16.4 Why Collisions Can Kill
      • 16.5 The Fracture Criterion
      • 16.6 The SSSA Criterion
      • 16.7 Criteria for Predicting Effects of Potential Accidents
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 17: Electrochemical Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Electrochemistry
      • 17.3 Principles of Electrochemical Engineering
      • 17.4 Lead-Acid Batteries
      • 17.5 The Ragone Chart
      • 17.6 Electrochemical Series
      • 17.7 Advanced Batteries
      • 17.8 Fuel Cells
      • 17.9 Ultracapacitors
      • Summary
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 18: Green Energy Engineering
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Solar Energy
      • 18.3 Other Green Energy Sources
      • 18.4 Sustainable Engineering
      • Summary
      • Exercises
  • Part 3: Hands-On
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 19: Introduction to Engineering Design
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 The Nature of Engineering Design
      • 19.3 Design Problems vs. Homework Problems
      • 19.4 Benefits of a Hands-On Design Project
      • 19.5 Qualities of a Good Designer
      • 19.6 Using a Design Notebook
      • 19.7 The Need for a Systematic Approach
      • 19.8 Steps in the Engineering Design Process
      • 19.9 Hands-On Design Exercise: “The Tower”
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 20: Design teams
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 How to Manage a Design Team Project
      • 20.3 Effective Teaming
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 21: Design Step 1: Defining the Problem
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Identifying the Need
      • 21.3 Defining the Problem
      • 21.4 List of Design Specifications
      • 21.5 Clarifying the Problem
      • 21.6 Design Milestone: Clarification of the Task
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 22: Design Step 2: Generation of Alternative Concepts
      • Abstract
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Brainstorming
      • 22.3 Concept Sketching
      • 22.4 Hands-on Design Exercise: “The Tube”
      • 22.5 Research-Based Strategies for Promoting Creativity
      • 22.6 Functional Decomposition for Complex Systems
      • 22.7 Design Milestone: Generation of Alternatives
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 23: Design Step 3: Evaluation of Alternatives and Selection of a Concept
      • Abstract
      • 23.1 Introduction
      • 23.2 Minimize the Information Content of the Design
      • 23.3 Maintain the Independence of Functional Requirements
      • 23.4 Design for Ease of Manufacture
      • 23.5 Design for Robustness
      • 23.6 Design for Adjustability
      • 23.7 Hands-On Design Exercise: “Waste Ball”
      • 23.8 The Decision Matrix
      • 23.9 Design Milestone: Evaluation of Alternatives
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 24: Design Step 4: Detailed Design
      • Abstract
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Analysis
      • 24.3 Mechanism Control
      • 24.4 Experiments
      • 24.5 Models
      • 24.6 Detailed Drawings
      • 24.7 Design Milestone: Detailed Design
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 25: Design Step 5: Design Defense
      • Abstract
      • 25.1 Introduction
      • 25.2 How to Prepare an Oral Defense
      • 25.3 Design Milestone: Oral Design Defense
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 26: Design Step 6: Manufacturing and Testing
      • Abstract
      • 26.1 Introduction
      • 26.2 Manufacturing and Testing Strategies
      • 26.3 Materials
      • 26.4 Joining Methods
      • 26.5 Useful Hand Tools
      • 26.6 Design Milestone: Design for Manufacture - Assessment I
      • 26.7 Design Milestone: Design for Manufacture - Assessment II
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 27: Design Step 7: Performance Evaluation
      • Abstract
      • 27.1 Introduction
      • 27.2 Individual Performance Testing
      • 27.3 The Final Competition
      • 27.4 Design Milestone: Individual Performance Testing
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 28: Design Step 8: Design Report
      • Abstract
      • 28.1 Introduction
      • 28.2 Organization of the Report
      • 28.3 Writing Guidelines
      • 28.4 Technical Writing is “Impersonal”
      • 28.5 Design Milestone: Design Report
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 29: Examples of Design Competitions
      • Abstract
      • 29.1 Introduction
      • 29.2 Design Competition Example 1: A Bridge Too Far
      • 29.3 Design Milestone Solutions for “A Bridge Too Far”
      • 29.4 Official Rules for the “A Bridge Too Far” Design Competition
      • 29.5 Design Competition Example 2: Mars Meteorite Retriever Challenge
      • 29.6 Some Design Milestones for the “Mars Meteorite Retriever Challenge”
      • 29.7 Official Rules for the “Mars Meteorite Retriever Challenge” Design Competition
      • Exercises
    • Chapter 30: Closing Remarks on the Important Role of Design Projects
      • Abstract
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
552
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128012420
eBook ISBN:
9780128025888

About the Author

Philip Kosky

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., USA; formerly Staff Scientist, GE Research Laboratory, Niskayuna, N.Y., USA

Robert Balmer

Affiliations and Expertise

Mechanical Engineering Professor Emeritus,University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Dean Emeritus, Engineering and Computer Science, Union College, Schenectady NY

William Keat

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Mechanical Engineering, Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., USA

George Wise

Affiliations and Expertise

Formerly Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., USA; also Technical Staff and Communication Specialist, GE Research Laboratory, Niskayuma, N.Y., USA