Essentials of 3D Biofabrication and Translation - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128009727, 9780128010150

Essentials of 3D Biofabrication and Translation

1st Edition

Authors: Anthony Atala James Yoo
eBook ISBN: 9780128010150
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128009727
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st August 2015
Page Count: 440
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
143.00
100.10
100.10
100.10
100.10
100.10
114.40
114.40
125.00
87.50
87.50
87.50
87.50
87.50
100.00
100.00
200.00
140.00
140.00
140.00
140.00
140.00
160.00
160.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Essentials of 3D Biofabrication and Translation discusses the techniques that are making bioprinting a viable alternative in regenerative medicine.

The book runs the gamut of topics related to the subject, including hydrogels and polymers, nanotechnology, toxicity testing, and drug screening platforms, also introducing current applications in the cardiac, skeletal, and nervous systems, and organ construction.

Leaders in clinical medicine and translational science provide a global perspective of the transformative nature of this field, including the use of cells, biomaterials, and macromolecules to create basic building blocks of tissues and organs, all of which are driving the field of biofabrication to transform regenerative medicine.

Key Features

  • Provides a new and versatile method to fabricating living tissue
  • Discusses future applications for 3D bioprinting technologies, including use in the cardiac, skeletal, and nervous systems, and organ construction
  • Describes current approaches and future challenges for translational science
  • Runs the gamut of topics related to the subject, from hydrogels and polymers to nanotechnology, toxicity testing, and drug screening platforms

Readership

biomedical and bioengineering researchers working in different phases of the development of regenerative medicine tools including cell banking, stem cells and cell therapy, biomaterials, and tissue engineering; and scientific administrators and grad students in biotechnology fields

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • List of Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Bioprinting Essentials of Cell and Protein Viability
    • Abstract
    • 1. An introduction to bioprinting
    • 2. Cell sourcing
    • 3. Biomaterials and bioinks
    • 4. Integration with biofabrication devices
    • 5. Maintenance and maturation of constructs
    • 6. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 2: Software for Biofabrication
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Concepts of medical image-based research and engineering
    • 3. “Bioprinting” means many things in 3D printing
    • 4. Bioprinting and conventional 3D printing require similar workflows and tools
    • 5. A software review
    • 6. Medical image-based research and engineering
    • 7. Creation of complex scaffolding or porous structures
    • 8. Preparation and optimization – from the final design to the printed object
    • 9. Management of a multiple-printer facility
    • 10. Examples of bioprinting applications benefiting from additive manufacturing software
    • 11. Conclusions
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 3: Design and Quality Control for Translating 3D-Printed Scaffolds
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Splint design control
    • 3. Laser sintering PCL splints
    • 4. Splint design verification
    • 5. Design validation – preclinical model results
    • 6. Design validation – clinical results
    • 7. The future of 3D laser-sintered PCL devices
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 4: Inkjet Bioprinting
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The advent of new era – biofabrication of tissues and organs
    • 3. Inkjet bioprinting technology for tissue engineering
    • 4. Inkjet bioprinting technology for pharmaceutical applications
    • 5. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 5: In Vivo and In Situ Biofabrication by Laser-Assisted Bioprinting
    • Abstract
    • 1. Merging computer-assisted surgery and biofabrication
    • 2. Customized bioprinting system for in vivo and in situ interventions
    • 3. Procedure for in vivo and in situ bioprinting into bone calvarial defects
    • 4. Proof of concept of in vivo and in situ bioprinting
    • 5. From in vitro to in vivo and in situ biofabrication
    • 6. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 6: Stereolithographic 3D Bioprinting for Biomedical Applications
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The stereolithographic process
    • 3. Applications of stereolithography in surgical procedures, prostheses, and implants
    • 4. Applications of stereolithography in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
    • 5. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 7: Extrusion Bioprinting
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Extrusion-based bioprinting system
    • 3. Biofabrication strategies
    • 4. Future directions
    • 5. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgment
  • Chapter 8: Indirect Rapid Prototyping for Tissue Engineering
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. RP technologies
    • 3. Indirect rapid prototyping
    • 4. Solidification of liquid materials
    • 5. Generation from the solid phase
    • 6. iRP2
    • 7. Discussion and conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 9: Bioprinting Using Aqueous Two-Phase System
    • Abstract
    • 1. Brief introduction to ATPS
    • 2. Additive printing using ATPS
    • 3. Subtractive printing using ATPS
    • 4. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 10: Bioprinting of Organs for Toxicology Testing
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Bioprinting technologies for organoid construction
    • 3. Bioprinted organoids
    • 4. Conclusions and future perspectives
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 11: High Throughput Screening with Biofabrication Platforms
    • Abstract
    • 1. Outline
    • 2. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional HTS
    • 3. High-content screening
    • 4. Bioprinting technologies
    • 5. HTS platforms
    • 6. HTS and organ bioprinting
    • 7. Data acquisition treatment and analysis
    • 8. Conclusions and Future Perspectives
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 12: Biosensor and Bioprinting
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Sensors
    • 3. Sensor technology for translational research on regenerative therapy
    • 4. Bioprinting technology for advances of biosensor
    • 5. Microprinting and patterning of living biosensor application
    • 6. Future perspectives
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 13: Polymers for Bioprinting
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Polymer properties for bioprinting
    • 3. Natural polymers for bioprinting
    • 4. Synthetic polymers
    • 5. Summary
    • 6. Polymer hybrids
    • 7. Emerging trends and future directions
    • 8. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 14: Hydrogels for 3D Bioprinting Applications
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. General principles
    • 3. Commonly used hydrogels
    • 4. Conclusions and future outlook
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 15: Bioprinting of Organoids
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Strategy of bioprinting technology for producing organoid structures
    • 3. Bioprinting modalities
    • 4. Bioinks for organoid printing
    • 5. Summary and future directions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 16: Bioprinting of Three-Dimensional Tissues and Organ Constructs
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Three-dimensional bioprinting technology
    • 3. Anatomically shaped 3D constructs
    • 4. Applications of bioprinting
    • 5. Current limitations and future perspectives
    • 6. Summary
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 17: Bioprinting of Bone
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Clinical need for bone graft and bone substitute
    • 3. Bone biology
    • 4. Wound healing
    • 5. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 18: Bioprinting of Cartilage: Recent Progress on Bioprinting of Cartilage
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Blueprint for bioprinting of cartilage
    • 3. Cell source for bioprinting of cartilage
    • 4. Materials for bioprinting of cartilage
    • 5. Other parameters include the stimulating factors and bioreactors
    • 6. Preclinical animal models for safety and efficacy evaluation of bioprinted cartilage
    • 7. Developing areas and future directions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 19: Biofabrication of Vascular Networks
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The vasculature
    • 3. Vascular Form and Function
    • 4. Vascular networks
    • 5. Vascular fabrication
    • 6. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 20: Bioprinting of Blood Vessels
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Blood vessel composition
    • 3. Challenges associated with vessel bioprinting
    • 4. Direct vessel bioprinting
    • 5. Hybrid vessel and graft fabrication
    • 6. Casting
    • 7. Strategies for indirect microvessel infiltration
    • 8. Postprinting
    • 9. Conclusions and future trends
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 21: Bioprinting of Cardiac Tissues
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Brief overview of heart anatomy and physiology
    • 3. Prevalence and severity of heart disease and defects
    • 4. Current clinical treatments for heart disease
    • 5. Engineering design criteria for tissue-engineered heart valves
    • 6. State-of-the-art approaches for cardiac tissue regeneration
    • 7. Strategies for heart valve tissue engineering
    • 8. Bioprinting of Myocardial Tissue
    • 9. 3D printing of tissue-engineered heart valves
    • 10. Potential cell source for 3D printing
    • 11. Conclusions and future direction
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 22: Bioprinting of Skin
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Structure of the skin
    • 3. Wound healing
    • 4. Treatment methods for skin repair
    • 5. Skin bioprinting
    • 6. Conclusions
    • Abbreviation
  • Chapter 23: Bioprinting of Nerve
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Bioprinting based on biological self-assembly
    • 3. Bioprinting tubular structures
    • 4. Biofabrication of a nerve graft
    • 5. Conclusions
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 24: Bioprinting: An Industrial Perspective
    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The role of 3D fabrication in the healthcare industry
    • 3. Commercial opportunities for 3D biofabrication
    • 4. Summary
    • Glossary
    • Abbreviations
  • Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
440
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128010150
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128009727

About the Author

Anthony Atala

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine was the first in the world to engineer and successfully implant an engineered organ in the lab -- bladders. As Director of the Institute, Dr. Atala oversees scientists working on therapies for more than 30 areas of the body, from heart valves and muscle tissue to livers and kidneys. Atala has received the Christopher Columbus Foundation Award, given to a living American who is currently working on a discovery that will significantly affect society. He is listed in Best Doctors in America.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Urology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA

James Yoo

Professor, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA