Encapsulation Technologies and Delivery Systems for Food Ingredients and Nutraceuticals - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857091246, 9780857095909

Encapsulation Technologies and Delivery Systems for Food Ingredients and Nutraceuticals

1st Edition

Editors: Nissim Garti D. Julian McClements
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857091246
eBook ISBN: 9780857095909
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 19th October 2012
Page Count: 640
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Table of Contents

Contributor contact details

Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition

Preface

Part I: Requirements for food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems

Chapter 1: Requirements for food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Active components and the need for encapsulation

1.3 Fabrication and characteristics of delivery systems

1.4 Particle characteristics, physicochemical properties and functional performance

1.5 Future trends

Chapter 2: Challenges in developing delivery systems for food additives, nutraceuticals and dietary supplements

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Classes of food ingredients

2.3 Formulating and designing microencapsulation systems for food additives, nutraceuticals and dietary supplements

2.4 Encapsulated ingredients and applications

2.5 The market for encapsulated ingredients and nutraceuticals

2.6 Future trends

2.7 Acknowledgement

Chapter 3: Interaction of food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems with the human gastrointestinal tract

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Model systems

3.3 The human gastrointestinal tract

3.4 Bioactive delivery system design

3.5 Implications of research on functional food development

3.6 Future trends

3.7 Sources of further information

Part II: Processing technology approaches to produce encapsulation and delivery systems

Chapter 4: Spray drying, freeze drying and related processes for food ingredient and nutraceutical encapsulation

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Principles and technical considerations of spray drying encapsulation

4.3 Applications of spray drying for food ingredient and nutraceutical encapsulation

4.4 Storage stability of spray dried encapsulated products and limitations of spray drying encapsulation

4.5 Principles and technical considerations of freeze drying encapsulation

4.6 Applications of freeze drying for food ingredient and nutraceutical encapsulation

4.7 Storage stability of freeze encapsulated products and limitations of freeze drying encapsulation

4.8 Future trends and conclusions

Chapter 5: Spray cooling and spray chilling for food ingredient and nutraceutical encapsulation

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction: principles of spray chilling

5.2 Spray cooling and spray chilling technologies

5.3 Formulations and applications

5.4 Future trends

5.5 Sources of further information

Chapter 6: Coextrusion for food ingredients and nutraceutical encapsulation: principles and technology

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Principles of coextrusion

6.3 Coextrusion technologies

6.4 Formulations and applications

6.5 Future trends

6.6 Sources of further information

Chapter 7: Fluid bed microencapsulation and other coating methods for food ingredient and nutraceutical bioactive compounds

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction: principles and purposes

7.2 Definition of microencapsulation and fluidized bed coating

7.3 Technology and machine design

7.4 Particle characteristics, process parameters and applications of fluid bed microencapsulation

7.5 Future trends

Chapter 8: Microencapsulation methods based on biopolymer phase separation and gelation phenomena in aqueous media

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Candidate biopolymer shell materials

8.3 Biopolymer solution properties and microcapsule formation

8.4 Encapsulation technology

8.5 Traditional versus emerging complex coacervation encapsulation procedures

8.6 Conclusions

Part III: Physicochemical approaches to produce encapsulation and delivery systems

Chapter 9: Micelles and microemulsions as food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Microemulsions: definitions and terminology

9.3 Water-in-oil (W/O) and oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsions

9.4 Solubilization of nutraceuticals in U-type microemulsions

9.5 Microemulsion processes and applications

9.6 Conclusions

Chapter 10: Biopolymeric amphiphiles and their assemblies as functional food ingredients and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Classification, composition, structure, properties and self-assembly of polymeric amphiphiles: proteins and peptides

10.3 Classification, composition, structure, properties and self-assemby of polymeric amphiphiles: polysaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharide-protein conjugates

10.4 Binding and co-assembly of biopolymeric amphiphiles and nutraceuticals

10.5 Mechanisms of solubilization and protection of hydrophobic nutraceuticals by biopolymeric amphiphiles

10.6 Applications and future trends of biopolymeric amphiphiles for encapsulation and delivery of food ingredients and nutraceuticals

10.7 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 11: Liposomes as food ingredients and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Formation and structures of liposomes

11.3 Liposome preparation methods

11.4 Characterization of liposomes

11.5 Encapsulation by liposomes

11.6 Liposome stability

11.7 Liposome applications in food systems

11.8 Stability of liposomes to gastrointestinal environment

11.9 Conclusions

Chapter 12: Colloidal emulsions and particles as micronutrient and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Physico-chemical stability, texture, taste and flavour

12.3 Appearance of dispersions in food products

12.4 Bioavailability of functional ingredients

12.5 Applications: overview of minerals and vitamins

12.6 Applications: vitamin A

12.7 Applications: vitamins D, E and K

12.8 Nutraceuticals: carotenoids

12.9 Nutraceuticals: water-soluble polyphenols

12.10 Nutraceuticals: water-insoluble polyphenols

12.11 Alkaloids and other photochemicals

12.12 Conclusions and future trends

12.13 Acknowledgements

Chapter 13: Structured oils and fats (organogels) as food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Research into organogelation as food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems

13.3 Nutraceuticals and their use in organogels

13.4 Delivery of carotenoids: lycopene and β-carotene

13.5 Health effects and delivery of phytosterols

13.6 Conclusions

Chapter 14: Hydrogel particles and other novel protein-based methods for food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems

Abstract:

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Food grade polysaccharides and proteins for hydrogel formation

14.3 Development of polysaccharide- and protein-based hydrogels: physical crosslinking approach

14.4 Development of polysaccharide- and protein-based hydrogels: chemical crosslinking approach

14.5 Polysaccharide- and protein-based hydrogels

14.6 Diffusion as a controlled-release mechanism

14.7 Degradation as a controlled-release mechanism

14.8 Other controlled-release mechanisms

14.9 Applications in food science

14.10 Future trends

Part IV: Characterization and applications of delivery systems

Chapter 15: An industry perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of different flavor delivery systems

Abstract:

15.1 Introduction

15.1.2 Industrial considerations

15.2 Physical chemistry of flavor delivery systems: interfaces in emulsion-based delivery systems

15.3 Barrier properties and permeation in core/shell delivery systems

15.4 Molecular weight distributions in glassy systems

15.5 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 16: An industry perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of different fish oil delivery systems

Abstract:

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Health benefits associated with long chain omega-3s

16.3 Fish oil delivery systems used in industry

16.4 Future trends: emerging strategies and technologies

16.5 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 17: An industry perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of iron micronutrient delivery systems

Abstract:

17.1 Introduction

17.2 Delivery systems of iron

17.3 Criteria for selection of food product, iron compound and delivery system

17.4 Application of iron delivery systems in dry food products

17.5 Application of iron delivery systems as simulated rice and food sprinkles

17.6 Application of iron delivery systems in dairy products and aqueous food products

17.7 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 18: Properties and applications of different probiotic delivery systems

Abstract:

18.1 Introduction

18.2 Microencapsulation techniques: physical methods

18.3 Microencapsulation techniques: chemical methods (hydrocolloid gel methods)

18.4 Supporting materials

18.5 Special treatment

18.6 Application of microencapsulated probiotics in food products

18.7 Future trends

Index


Description

Improved technologies for the encapsulation, protection, release and enhanced bioavailability of food ingredients and nutraceutical components are vital to the development of future foods. Encapsulation technologies and delivery systems for food ingredients and nutraceuticals provides a comprehensive guide to current and emerging techniques.

Part one provides an overview of key requirements for food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems, discussing challenges in system development and analysis of interaction with the human gastrointestinal tract. Processing technologies for encapsulation and delivery systems are the focus of part two. Spray drying, cooling and chilling are reviewed alongside coextrusion, fluid bed microencapsulation, microencapsulation methods based on biopolymer phase separation, and gelation phenomena in aqueous media. Part three goes on to investigate physicochemical approaches to the production of encapsulation and delivery systems, including the use of micelles and microemulsions, polymeric amphiphiles, liposomes, colloidal emulsions, organogels and hydrogels. Finally, part four reviews characterization and applications of delivery systems, providing industry perspectives on flavour, fish oil, iron micronutrient and probiotic delivery systems.

With its distinguished editors and international team of expert contributors, Encapsulation technologies and delivery systems for food ingredients and nutraceuticals is an authoritative guide for both industry and academic researchers interested in encapsulation and controlled release systems.

Key Features

  • Provides a comprehensive guide to current and emerging techniques in encapsulation technologies and delivery systems
  • Chapters in part one provide an overview of key requirements for food ingredient and nutraceutical delivery systems, while part two discusses processing technologies for encapsulation and delivery systems
  • Later sections investigate physicochemical approaches to the production of encapsulation and delivery systems and review characterization and applications of delivery systems

Readership

Researchers in both industry and academia; Those in R&D at companies which specialize in delivery of food compounds via encapsulation


Details

No. of pages:
640
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2012
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857095909
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857091246

Reviews

The two editors of the book are well known in this field and have successfully managed, together with the other contributing authors, to cover the subject in an interesting manner to the reader and demonstrate the many factors involved in this subject. The book provides an essential reading to researchers in this field and an interesting reading to all who would like to gain more information about this processing system. The book has a wealth of information with good referencing and could be recommended to researchers, technologist and students alike., International Journal of Dairy Technology


About the Editors

Nissim Garti Editor

(FROM EDIBLE OLEOGELS) Nissim Garti obtained his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has been a full professor since 1990 and holds the Ratner Chair of Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry. He also serves as a Board Member Elect and Director of the Hebrew University Governors Executive Board since January 2011. Nissim is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards including the Rockefeller Award, the Israel President Award for one of the most innovative inventions in 60 years of the existence of the country, Life-Time Achievement Award of the Food Society, the Chang Award of the AOCS, the Corporate Research Achievement Award of the AOCS for 2011, and many others. His achievements include publishing over 380 original (research) refereed papers in peer reviewed journals; writing over 60 review chapters in scientific books; granted over 80 patents; edited 7 books and additional 4 in preparation; invited to over 180 conferences as keynote, session, and invited speaker; and educated and tutored 38 Ph.D. students and 84 M.Sc. students. Nissim is a member of the board of directors of several academic institutions in Israel and consults for several Israeli and global industries. Nissim’s expertise, competence, and active research is in colloid chemistry, emulsion technology, dispersed systems, delivery new vehicles, microemulsions and lyotropic liquid crystals, crystallization phenomena, interfacial reactions and reactivity, amphiphilic proteins, hydrocolloids, dendrimers, nutraceuticals, and food science. OR (FROM COCOA BUTTER) Nissim Garti is Professor of Chemistry at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. One of the founders of Adumim Chemicals Ltd., NutraLease Ltd.—a company focused on a nano-encapsulation technology for nutraceuticals, and LDS (Lyotropic Delivery Systems). He received B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, in 1969, 1971 and 1974 respectively. Garti was awarded: Life Time Achievement of the Israeli Association for Food Research and Technology, Tel-Aviv, 2009; The Chung Scientific Award of the AOCS for Outstanding Scientific and Technology Achievements, Orlando, 2009; The Most Innovative Israeli Nanotechnology Award Winner of the CMNC Society, “Food Goes Nano- Liquid Nano Vehicles for Nutraceuticals solubilization and delivery,” Chicago, USA, 2005; The Japanese Award for the Promotion of Senior Foreign Scientists, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan, 2003; The Best Invention and Innovation of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem 1997; The Most Innovative Food Ingredient Award in Europe (FIE), London, 1997; and The Japan Oil Chemical Society Forum Award for Outstanding Achievement, “Polymorphism in Fats,” Nara, Japan, 1997. Professor Garti is the author of more than 400 publications and holds over 70 patents.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Ratner Chair of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

D. Julian McClements Editor

Professor Julian McClements works in the Department of Food Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is well known for his research into lipid oxidation and antioxidants.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Massachusetts, USA