Emerging Technologies and Management of Crop Stress Tolerance - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128008768, 9780128010884

Emerging Technologies and Management of Crop Stress Tolerance

1st Edition

Volume 1-Biological Techniques

Editors: Parvaiz Ahmad Saiema Rasool
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128008768
eBook ISBN: 9780128010884
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 10th April 2014
Page Count: 592
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Description

  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Editors
  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1. Genomic Approaches and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Physiological, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms of abiotic stress in plants
    • 1.3 Effects of abiotic stresses on physiological, cellular, and biochemical processes in plants
    • 1.4 Conventional breeding technology to induce abiotic stress tolerance in plants
    • 1.5 Functional genomics approaches to induce abiotic stress tolerance in plants
    • 1.6 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 2. Metabolomics Role in Crop Improvement
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Techniques involved in metabolomics
    • 2.3 Metabolomics and nutrigenomics—a link
    • 2.4 Applications of metabolomics in crop improvement
    • 2.5 Improvement of strawberry quality by metabolomics
    • 2.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 3. Transcription Factors and Environmental Stresses in Plants
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Transcription factors activate stress responsive genes
    • 3.3 APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element-binding factor
    • 3.4 The MYC/MYB transcriptional factors
    • 3.5 NAC transcriptional factors
    • 3.6 WRKY transcriptional factors
    • 3.7 CYS2HIS2 zinc-finger (C2H2 ZF) TFs
    • 3.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 4. Plant Resistance under Cold Stress: Metabolomics, Proteomics, and Genomic Approaches
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Causes of freezing injury
    • 4.3 Freezing-tolerance mechanisms
    • 4.4 Antioxidant defense under cold stress
    • 4.5 Cold signal transducers
    • 4.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 5. Genetic Engineering of Crop Plants for Abiotic Stress Tolerance
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Overexpression of genes for transcriptional regulation
    • 5.3 Overexpression of genes for osmoprotectants
    • 5.4 Engineering of ion transport
    • 5.5 Overexpression of genes for stress signaling
    • 5.6 Quenching of reactive oxygen species
    • 5.7 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 6. Bt Crops: A Sustainable Approach towards Biotic Stress Tolerance
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Bacillus thuringiensis
    • 6.3 Transformation of crops with Bt genes
    • 6.4 Molecular analyses of putative transgenic plants
    • 6.5 Greenhouse and field experiments
    • 6.6 Biosafety and risk assessment studies
    • 6.7 Conclusion and future prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 7. Modern Tools for Enhancing Crop Adaptation to Climatic Changes
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Stresses caused by climatic changes
    • 7.3 Modern tools for enhancing crop adaptation
    • 7.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 8. Interactions of Nanoparticles with Plants: An Emerging Prospective in the Agriculture Industry
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Classification of nanoparticles
    • 8.3 Applications of NPs
    • 8.4 Plant–nanoparticle interactions: yet to reach “the state of art”
    • 8.5 Mode of nanoparticle internalization by plants
    • 8.6 Influence of nanoparticles as growth promoters in plants
    • 8.7 Influence of NPs as biological control in plants
    • 8.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 9. Role of miRNAs in Abiotic and Biotic Stresses in Plants
    • 9.1 Introduction: miRNA as a significant player in gene regulation
    • 9.2 Mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis and function
    • 9.3 miRNA-mediated functions in plants
    • 9.4 Genome-wide miRNA profiling under abiotic stresses
    • 9.5 Involvement of miRNAs in plant stresses
    • 9.6 Overexpression of miRNAs to resolve their functions in abiotic stresses in plants
    • 9.7 Innovative approaches for elucidating gene function
    • 9.8 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 10. Gene Silencing: A Novel Cellular Defense Mechanism Improving Plant Productivity under Environmental Stresses
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Elements of RNAi
    • 10.3 Mode of action
    • 10.4 RNAi under environmental stresses
    • 10.5 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 11. The Role of Carbohydrates in Plant Resistance to Abiotic Stresses
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Osmotic balance during the action of unfavorable environmental factors
    • 11.3 Compatible osmolytes and physiology of resistance
    • 11.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 12. Role of Glucosinolates in Plant Stress Tolerance
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Glucosinolate structure, isolation, and analysis
    • 12.3 Biosynthesis of glucosinolates
    • 12.4 Role of glucosinolates in stress alleviation
    • 12.5 Genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis
    • 12.6 Gene expression profiling in response to environmental cues
    • 12.7 Signaling networks
    • 12.8 Metabolic engineering of glucosinolates
    • 12.9 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 13. Plant Responses to Iron, Manganese, and Zinc Deficiency Stress
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Iron deficiency in soils
    • 13.3 Soil factors influencing Fe availability and uptake
    • 13.4 Physiological roles and symptoms of Fe deficiency in plants
    • 13.5 Physiological mechanisms and adaptation strategies of plants under Fe deficiency conditions
    • 13.6 Manganese deficiency in soils
    • 13.7 Soil factors influencing Mn availability
    • 13.8 Physiological roles and symptoms of Mn deficiency in plants
    • 13.9 Physiological mechanisms and adaptation strategies of plants under Mn deficiency conditions
    • 13.10 Zinc deficiency in soils
    • 13.11 Soil factors influencing Zn availability
    • 13.12 Physiological roles and symptoms of Zn deficiency in plants
    • 13.13 Physiological mechanisms and adaptation strategies of plants under Zn deficiency conditions
    • 13.14 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 14. Role of Trace Elements in Alleviating Environmental Stress
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Plant responses to environmental stress
    • 14.3 Alleviation of environmental stress by trace elements
    • 14.4 Effects of beneficial elements on plant stress responses
    • 14.5 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 15. Nutritional Stress in Dystrophic Savanna Soils of the Orinoco Basin: Biological Responses to Low Nitrogen and Phosphorus Availabilities
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Main environmental features of the savannas of the Orinoco basin
    • 15.3 Nutritional stresses in well-drained savannas—nitrogen as a limiting element
    • 15.4 Nutritional stresses in well-drained savannas—phosphorus as a limiting element
    • 15.5 Strategies that are used by native savanna plants to enhance nitrogen and phosphorus conservation and uptake
    • 15.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 16. Silicon and Selenium: Two Vital Trace Elements that Confer Abiotic Stress Tolerance to Plants
    • 16.1 Introduction
    • 16.2 Silicon uptake and transport in plants
    • 16.3 Selenium uptake and metabolism in plants
    • 16.4 Involvement of silicon and selenium in plant growth, development, and physiology
    • 16.5 Effect of silicon and selenium in improving yield of crop plants
    • 16.6 Protective roles of silicon and selenium under abiotic stress
    • 16.7 Conclusion and future prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 17. Herbicides, Pesticides, and Plant Tolerance: An Overview
    • 17.1 Introduction
    • 17.2 Global pesticide use
    • 17.3 Why pesticide-/herbicide-tolerant plants?
    • 17.4 Mechanisms of Herbicide/pesticide tolerance in plants
    • 17.5 The selection process of tolerant plants
    • 17.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 18. Effects of Humic Materials on Plant Metabolism and Agricultural Productivity
    • 18.1 Introduction
    • 18.2 General aspects of the characteristics of humic materials and their functions
    • 18.3 Use of humic materials for sustainable plant production
    • 18.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 19. Climate Changes and Potential Impacts on Quality of Fruit and Vegetable Crops
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Impacts of climate change on vegetable production systems in Brazil
    • 19.3 Harvest and post-harvest
    • 19.4 Effects of temperature
    • 19.5 Effects of carbon dioxide exposure
    • 19.6 Effects of ozone exposure
    • 19.7 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 20. Interplays of Plant Circadian Clock and Abiotic Stress Response Networks
    • Abstract
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 Molecular basis of the circadian clock function in plants
    • 20.3 Molecular basis of the interaction between the clock components and cold response
    • 20.4 Crosstalk between the circadian clock and ABA transcriptional networks
    • 20.5 Light inputs to the clock
    • 20.6 Relationships between ROS transcriptional network and the circadian timekeeping system
    • 20.7 Contribution of cellular metabolism to circadian network
    • 20.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 21. Development of Water Saving Techniques for Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in the Arid Environment of Punjab, Pakistan
    • 21.1 Introduction
    • 21.2 Methodology
    • 21.3 Results and discussion
    • 21.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Index

Key Features

  • Includes the most recent advances methods and applications of biotechnology to crop science
  • Discusses different techniques of genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and nanotechnology
  • Promotes the prevention of potential diseases to inhibit bacteria postharvest quality of fruits and vegetable crops by advancing application and research
  • Presents a thorough account of research results and critical reviews

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Editors
  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1. Genomic Approaches and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Physiological, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms of abiotic stress in plants
    • 1.3 Effects of abiotic stresses on physiological, cellular, and biochemical processes in plants
    • 1.4 Conventional breeding technology to induce abiotic stress tolerance in plants
    • 1.5 Functional genomics approaches to induce abiotic stress tolerance in plants
    • 1.6 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 2. Metabolomics Role in Crop Improvement
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Techniques involved in metabolomics
    • 2.3 Metabolomics and nutrigenomics—a link
    • 2.4 Applications of metabolomics in crop improvement
    • 2.5 Improvement of strawberry quality by metabolomics
    • 2.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 3. Transcription Factors and Environmental Stresses in Plants
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Transcription factors activate stress responsive genes
    • 3.3 APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element-binding factor
    • 3.4 The MYC/MYB transcriptional factors
    • 3.5 NAC transcriptional factors
    • 3.6 WRKY transcriptional factors
    • 3.7 CYS2HIS2 zinc-finger (C2H2 ZF) TFs
    • 3.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 4. Plant Resistance under Cold Stress: Metabolomics, Proteomics, and Genomic Approaches
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Causes of freezing injury
    • 4.3 Freezing-tolerance mechanisms
    • 4.4 Antioxidant defense under cold stress
    • 4.5 Cold signal transducers
    • 4.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 5. Genetic Engineering of Crop Plants for Abiotic Stress Tolerance
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Overexpression of genes for transcriptional regulation
    • 5.3 Overexpression of genes for osmoprotectants
    • 5.4 Engineering of ion transport
    • 5.5 Overexpression of genes for stress signaling
    • 5.6 Quenching of reactive oxygen species
    • 5.7 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 6. Bt Crops: A Sustainable Approach towards Biotic Stress Tolerance
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Bacillus thuringiensis
    • 6.3 Transformation of crops with Bt genes
    • 6.4 Molecular analyses of putative transgenic plants
    • 6.5 Greenhouse and field experiments
    • 6.6 Biosafety and risk assessment studies
    • 6.7 Conclusion and future prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 7. Modern Tools for Enhancing Crop Adaptation to Climatic Changes
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Stresses caused by climatic changes
    • 7.3 Modern tools for enhancing crop adaptation
    • 7.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 8. Interactions of Nanoparticles with Plants: An Emerging Prospective in the Agriculture Industry
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Classification of nanoparticles
    • 8.3 Applications of NPs
    • 8.4 Plant–nanoparticle interactions: yet to reach “the state of art”
    • 8.5 Mode of nanoparticle internalization by plants
    • 8.6 Influence of nanoparticles as growth promoters in plants
    • 8.7 Influence of NPs as biological control in plants
    • 8.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 9. Role of miRNAs in Abiotic and Biotic Stresses in Plants
    • 9.1 Introduction: miRNA as a significant player in gene regulation
    • 9.2 Mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis and function
    • 9.3 miRNA-mediated functions in plants
    • 9.4 Genome-wide miRNA profiling under abiotic stresses
    • 9.5 Involvement of miRNAs in plant stresses
    • 9.6 Overexpression of miRNAs to resolve their functions in abiotic stresses in plants
    • 9.7 Innovative approaches for elucidating gene function
    • 9.8 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 10. Gene Silencing: A Novel Cellular Defense Mechanism Improving Plant Productivity under Environmental Stresses
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Elements of RNAi
    • 10.3 Mode of action
    • 10.4 RNAi under environmental stresses
    • 10.5 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 11. The Role of Carbohydrates in Plant Resistance to Abiotic Stresses
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Osmotic balance during the action of unfavorable environmental factors
    • 11.3 Compatible osmolytes and physiology of resistance
    • 11.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 12. Role of Glucosinolates in Plant Stress Tolerance
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Glucosinolate structure, isolation, and analysis
    • 12.3 Biosynthesis of glucosinolates
    • 12.4 Role of glucosinolates in stress alleviation
    • 12.5 Genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis
    • 12.6 Gene expression profiling in response to environmental cues
    • 12.7 Signaling networks
    • 12.8 Metabolic engineering of glucosinolates
    • 12.9 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 13. Plant Responses to Iron, Manganese, and Zinc Deficiency Stress
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Iron deficiency in soils
    • 13.3 Soil factors influencing Fe availability and uptake
    • 13.4 Physiological roles and symptoms of Fe deficiency in plants
    • 13.5 Physiological mechanisms and adaptation strategies of plants under Fe deficiency conditions
    • 13.6 Manganese deficiency in soils
    • 13.7 Soil factors influencing Mn availability
    • 13.8 Physiological roles and symptoms of Mn deficiency in plants
    • 13.9 Physiological mechanisms and adaptation strategies of plants under Mn deficiency conditions
    • 13.10 Zinc deficiency in soils
    • 13.11 Soil factors influencing Zn availability
    • 13.12 Physiological roles and symptoms of Zn deficiency in plants
    • 13.13 Physiological mechanisms and adaptation strategies of plants under Zn deficiency conditions
    • 13.14 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 14. Role of Trace Elements in Alleviating Environmental Stress
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Plant responses to environmental stress
    • 14.3 Alleviation of environmental stress by trace elements
    • 14.4 Effects of beneficial elements on plant stress responses
    • 14.5 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 15. Nutritional Stress in Dystrophic Savanna Soils of the Orinoco Basin: Biological Responses to Low Nitrogen and Phosphorus Availabilities
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Main environmental features of the savannas of the Orinoco basin
    • 15.3 Nutritional stresses in well-drained savannas—nitrogen as a limiting element
    • 15.4 Nutritional stresses in well-drained savannas—phosphorus as a limiting element
    • 15.5 Strategies that are used by native savanna plants to enhance nitrogen and phosphorus conservation and uptake
    • 15.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 16. Silicon and Selenium: Two Vital Trace Elements that Confer Abiotic Stress Tolerance to Plants
    • 16.1 Introduction
    • 16.2 Silicon uptake and transport in plants
    • 16.3 Selenium uptake and metabolism in plants
    • 16.4 Involvement of silicon and selenium in plant growth, development, and physiology
    • 16.5 Effect of silicon and selenium in improving yield of crop plants
    • 16.6 Protective roles of silicon and selenium under abiotic stress
    • 16.7 Conclusion and future prospects
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 17. Herbicides, Pesticides, and Plant Tolerance: An Overview
    • 17.1 Introduction
    • 17.2 Global pesticide use
    • 17.3 Why pesticide-/herbicide-tolerant plants?
    • 17.4 Mechanisms of Herbicide/pesticide tolerance in plants
    • 17.5 The selection process of tolerant plants
    • 17.6 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 18. Effects of Humic Materials on Plant Metabolism and Agricultural Productivity
    • 18.1 Introduction
    • 18.2 General aspects of the characteristics of humic materials and their functions
    • 18.3 Use of humic materials for sustainable plant production
    • 18.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 19. Climate Changes and Potential Impacts on Quality of Fruit and Vegetable Crops
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Impacts of climate change on vegetable production systems in Brazil
    • 19.3 Harvest and post-harvest
    • 19.4 Effects of temperature
    • 19.5 Effects of carbon dioxide exposure
    • 19.6 Effects of ozone exposure
    • 19.7 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Chapter 20. Interplays of Plant Circadian Clock and Abiotic Stress Response Networks
    • Abstract
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 Molecular basis of the circadian clock function in plants
    • 20.3 Molecular basis of the interaction between the clock components and cold response
    • 20.4 Crosstalk between the circadian clock and ABA transcriptional networks
    • 20.5 Light inputs to the clock
    • 20.6 Relationships between ROS transcriptional network and the circadian timekeeping system
    • 20.7 Contribution of cellular metabolism to circadian network
    • 20.8 Conclusion and future perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 21. Development of Water Saving Techniques for Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in the Arid Environment of Punjab, Pakistan
    • 21.1 Introduction
    • 21.2 Methodology
    • 21.3 Results and discussion
    • 21.4 Conclusion and future prospects
    • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
592
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128010884
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128008768

About the Editor

Parvaiz Ahmad

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Kashmir, India

Saiema Rasool

Affiliations and Expertise

Jamia Hamdard University, New Delhi, India