Electric Renewable Energy Systems - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128044483, 9780128006368

Electric Renewable Energy Systems

1st Edition

Authors: Muhammad Rashid
eBook ISBN: 9780128006368
Paperback ISBN: 9780128044483
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 30th November 2015
Page Count: 450
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Description

  • This derivative volume stemming from content included in our seminal Power Electronics Handbook takes its chapters related to renewables and establishes them at the core of a new volume dedicated to the increasingly pivotal and as yet under-published intersection of Power Electronics and Alternative Energy. While this re-versioning provides a corollary revenue stream to better leverage our core handbook asset, it does more than simply re-package existing content. Each chapter will be significantly updated and expanded by more than 50%, and all new introductory and summary chapters will be added to contextualize and tie the volume together. Therefore, unlike traditional derivative volumes, we will be able to offer new and updated material to the market and include this largely original content in our ScienceDirect Energy collection.
  • Due to the inherently multi-disciplinary nature of renewables, many engineers come from backgrounds in Physics, Materials, or Chemical Engineering, and therefore do not have experience working in-depth with electronics. As more and more alternative and distributed energy systems require grid hook-ups and on-site storage, a working knowledge of batteries, inverters and other power electronics components becomes requisite. Further, as renewables enjoy broadening commercial implementation, power electronics professionals are interested to learn of the challenges and strategies particular to applications in alternative energy. This book will bring each group up-to-speed with the primary issues of importance at this technological node.
  • This content clarifies the juncture of two key coverage areas for our Energy portfolio: alternative sources and power systems. It serves to bridge the information in our power engineering and renewable energy lists, supporting the growing grid cluster in the former and adding key information on practical implementation to the latter.

Key Features

  • Provides a thorough overview of the key technologies, methods and challenges for implementing power electronics in alternative energy systems for optimal power generation
  • Includes hard-to-find information on how to apply converters, inverters, batteries, controllers and more for stand-alone and grid-connected systems
  • Covers wind and solar applications, as well as ocean and geothermal energy, hybrid systems and fuel cells

Readership

Researchers, engineers and scientists working with renewable energy, energy storage and/or grid transmission. Power engineers, systems planners and operators, energy storage engineers & designers

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • List of Contributors
  • About the Editor-in-Chief
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction to electrical energy systems
    • Abstract
    • 1.1. Electrical energy systems
    • 1.2. Energy and power
    • 1.3. AC versus DC supply
    • 1.4. Basic energy conversion processes
    • 1.5. Review of the laws of thermodynamics
    • 1.6. Photovoltaic energy conversion systems
    • 1.7. Electrochemical energy conversion systems
    • 1.8. Thermoelectric energy conversion systems
    • 1.9. Electromechanical energy conversion systems
    • 1.10. Energy storage
    • 1.11. Efficiency and losses
    • 1.12. Energy resources
    • 1.13. Environmental considerations
  • 2: Components of electric energy systems
    • Abstract
    • 2.1. Introduction
    • 2.2. Power plants
    • 2.3. Electric power generators
    • 2.4. Transformers
    • 2.5. Transmission lines
    • 2.6. Relays and circuit breakers
    • 2.7. Voltage regulators
    • 2.8. Subtransmission
    • 2.9. Distribution systems
    • 2.10. Loads
    • 2.11. Power capacitors
    • 2.12. Control centers
    • 2.13. Worldwide standards for household voltage and frequency
    • 2.14. Representation of an electrical energy system
    • 2.15. Equivalent circuits and reactance diagrams
    • 2.16. Per-unit system
    • 2.17. Summary
  • 3: Solar energy
    • Abstract
    • 3.1. Introduction
    • 3.2. Passive solar energy system
    • 3.3. Active solar energy system (photovoltaic)
    • 3.4. Ideal PV model
    • 3.5. Practical PV model
    • 3.6. Effect of irradiance and temperature on solar cells
    • 3.7. PV module
    • 3.8. Daily power profile of PV array
    • 3.9. Photovoltaic system integration
    • 3.10. Evaluation of PV systems
    • 3.11. Advantages of solar energy
    • 3.12. Disadvantage
    • 3.13. Summary
  • 4: Wind energy
    • Abstract
    • 4.1. Introduction
    • 4.2. Wind turbine
    • 4.3. Kinetic energy of wind
    • 4.4. Aerodynamic force
    • 4.5. Power output from practical turbines
    • 4.6. Tip speed ratio
    • 4.7. Coefficient of performance and turbine efficiency
    • 4.8. Operating range of wind turbine
    • 4.9. Classifications of wind turbines
    • 4.10. Types of wind turbine generator systems
    • 4.11. Wind farm performance
    • 4.12. Advantages and disadvantages
    • 4.13. Summary
  • 5: Hydroelectricity
    • Abstract
    • 5.1. Introduction
    • 5.2. Process of hydroelectricity
    • 5.3. Basics of pumps and turbines
    • 5.4. Electric generators and energy conversion schemes for hydroelectricity
    • 5.5. Summary
  • 6: Fuel cells
    • Abstract
    • 6.1. Introduction
    • 6.2. Fuel cell fundamentals
    • 6.3. Modeling of ideal fuel cells
    • 6.4. Advantages and disadvantages of fuel cells
    • 6.5. Power applications of fuel cells
    • 6.6. FC and environment: hydrogen production and safety
    • 6.7. Hydrogen economy
  • 7: Geothermal energy
    • Abstract
    • 7.1. Introduction
    • 7.2. Geothermal energy uses and types
    • 7.3. Evaluation of geothermal power plant
    • 7.4. Summary
    • Nomenclature
    • Acknowledgment
  • 8: Utilization of bioresources as fuels and energy generation
    • Abstract
    • 8.1. Introduction
    • 8.2. Biomass characterization
    • 8.3. Pretreatment of biomass
    • 8.4. Thermal conversion processes
    • 8.5. Densification of biomass
    • 8.6. Biomass gasification
    • 8.7. Biodiesel fuels
    • 8.8. Bioethanol from biomass
    • 8.9. Present and future utilization scenario of biomass
    • 8.10. Conclusions
  • 9: Single-phase AC supply
    • Abstract
    • 9.1. Introduction
    • 9.2. Alternating current waveform
    • 9.3. Root mean square
    • 9.4. Phase shift
    • 9.5. Concept of phasors
    • 9.6. Complex number analysis
    • 9.7. Complex impedance
    • 9.8. Electric power
    • 9.9. Electrical energy
    • 9.10. Advantages and disadvantages of a single-phase supply
    • 9.11. Summary
  • 10: Three-phase AC supply
    • Abstract
    • 10.1. Introduction
    • 10.2. Generation of three-phase voltages
    • 10.3. Connections of three-phase circuits
    • 10.4. Circuits with mixed connections
    • 10.5. Power calculation of balanced three-phase circuit
    • 10.6. Advantages and disadvantages of three-phase supply
    • 10.7. Summary
  • 11: Magnetic circuits and power transformers
    • Abstract
    • 11.1. Introduction
    • 11.2. Magnetic circuits
    • 11.3. Equivalent circuit of a core excited by an AC MMF
    • 11.4. Principle of operation of a transformer
    • 11.5. Voltage, current, and impedance transformations
    • 11.6. Nonideal transformer and its equivalent circuits
    • 11.7. Tests on transformers
    • 11.8. Transformer polarity
    • 11.9. Transformers in parallel
    • 11.10. Three-phase transformer connections
    • 11.11. Special transformer connection
    • 11.12. Parallel operation of three-phase transformers
    • 11.13. Autotransformers
    • 11.14. Three-winding transformers
    • 11.15. Instrument transformers
    • 11.16. Third harmonics in transformers
    • 11.17. Transformers in a microgrid
    • 11.18. Summary
  • 12: Renewable energy generators and control
    • Abstract
    • 12.1. Introduction – general
    • 12.2. General features of electric machines
    • 12.3. Basic construction
    • 12.4. Type of electric supply and load
    • 12.5. Basic energy conversion principles
    • 12.6. Synchronous generators
    • 12.7. Induction machines
    • 12.8. Practical renewable energy-based power generating schemes
    • 12.9. Summary
  • 13: Power semiconductor devices
    • Abstract
    • 13.1. Introduction
    • 13.2. Power diodes
    • 13.3. Bipolar junction transistors (BJT)
    • 13.4. Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor
    • 13.5. Insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs)
    • 13.6. GaN- and SiC-based devices
    • 13.7. Silicon-controlled rectifiers
    • 13.8. Gate turn-off thyristors
    • 13.9. Integrated gate commutated thyristors
    • 13.10. Guidelines for selecting devices
    • 13.11. Summary
  • 14: AC–DC converters (rectifiers)
    • Abstract
    • 14.1. Introduction
    • 14.2. Performance parameters
    • 14.3. Single-phase full-bridge rectifier circuit
    • 14.4. Three-phase full-bridge rectifier
    • 14.5. PWM rectifier
    • 14.6. Single-phase full-bridge controlled rectifier
    • 14.7. Three-phase controlled rectifier
    • 14.8. Filters for AC to DC converters
    • 14.9. Summary
  • 15: DC–DC converters
    • Abstract
    • 15.1. Introduction
    • 15.2. Basic nonisolated switch-mode DC–DC converters
    • 15.3. DC–DC converter applications
    • 15.4. Buck converter
    • 15.5. Boost converter
    • 15.6. Buck–boost converter
    • 15.7. SEPIC converter
    • 15.8. Summary
  • 16: DC–AC inverters
    • Abstract
    • 16.1. Introduction
    • 16.2. Single-phase voltage-source inverters
    • 16.3. Three-phase bridge voltage-source inverters
    • 16.4. Multistepped Inverters
    • 16.5. PWM inverters
    • 16.6. Current-source inverters
    • 16.7. Summary
  • 17: Electric power transmission
    • Abstract
    • 17.1. Introduction
    • 17.2. Overhead transmission lines
    • 17.3. Transmission line parameters
    • 17.4. Transmission line representation
    • 17.5. Transmission line as a two-port network and power flow
    • 17.6. High voltage DC transmission
    • 17.7. Summary
  • 18: Electric power systems
    • Abstract
    • 18.1. Introduction
    • 18.2. Phases of power system engineering
    • 18.3. Interconnected systems
    • 18.4. Fault analysis
    • 18.5. Power flow study
    • 18.6. Power system stability
    • 18.7. Summary
  • 19: Control of photovoltaic technology
    • Abstract
    • 19.1. Introduction to semiconductor physics
    • 19.2. Basics of a photovoltaic cell
    • 19.3. Maximum power point tracking
    • 19.4. Shading impact on PV characteristics
    • 19.5. Mode of operation of a PV system
  • 20: Integration of distributed renewable energy systems into the smart grid
    • Abstract
    • 20.1. Introduction
    • 20.2. Conventional power generation
    • 20.3. Electricity generation from renewable energy resources
    • 20.4. Grid connection of distributed RES
    • 20.5. Distributed renewable energy sources
    • 20.6. Voltage control in power networks
    • 20.7. Power quality and harmonics
    • 20.8. Regulations for connection of distributed RES to the grid
    • 20.9. Smart grid solutions
  • 21: Environmental impacts of renewable energy
    • Abstract
    • 21.1. Introduction
    • 21.2. Environmental concerns related to fossil fuel power plants
    • 21.3. Environmental concerns related to hydroelectric power plants
    • 21.4. Environmental concerns related to nuclear power plants
    • 21.5. Environmental concerns related to renewable energy
    • 21.6. Summary
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
450
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128006368
Paperback ISBN:
9780128044483

About the Author

Muhammad Rashid

Muhammad H. Rashid is employed by the Florida Polytechnic University as a Professor of Electrical Engineering. Previously he was employed by the University of West Florida, Pensacola, Florida as a professor of electrical and computer engineering. He was also employed by the University of Florida as Professor and Director of UF/UWF Joint Program. Rashid received B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Birmingham in UK. Previously, he worked as Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Chair of the Engineering Department at Indiana University- Purdue University at Fort Wayne. Also, he worked as Visiting Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Connecticut, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Concordia University (Montreal, Canada), Professor of Electrical Engineering at Purdue University Calumet, and Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering at King Fahd university of Petroleum and Minerals (Saudi Arabia), as a design and development engineer with Brush Electrical Machines Ltd. (England, UK), a Research Engineer with Lucas Group Research Centre (England, UK), a Lecturer and Head of Control Engineering Department at the Higher Institute of Electronics (in Libya & Malta). Dr. Rashid is actively involved in teaching, researching, and lecturing in electronics, power electronics, and professional ethics. He has published 22 books listed in the US Library of Congress and more than 160 technical papers. His books are adopted as textbooks all over the world. His book, Power electronics has translations in Spanish, Portuguese, Indonesian, Korean, Italian, Chinese, Persian, and Indian edition. His book, Microelectronics has translations in Spanish in Mexico and in Spain, Italian, and Chinese. He has received many invitations from foreign governments and agencies to give keynote lectures and consult, by foreign universities to serve as an external examiner for undergraduate, master's and Ph.D. examinations, by funding agencies to review research proposals, and by U.S. and foreign universities to evaluate promotion cases for professorship. Dr. Rashid has worked as a regular employee or consultant in Canada, Korea, United Kingdom, Singapore, Malta, Libya, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Dr. Rashid has traveled to almost all States in USA and many countries to lecture and present papers (Japan, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Taiwan, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, India, Pakistan, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Libya, Jordan, Egypt, Morocco, Malta, Italy, Greece, United Kingdom, Brazil, and Mexico). He is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering & Technology (IET, UK) and a Life Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE, USA). He was elected as an IEEE Fellow with the citation “Leadership in power electronics education and contributions to the analysis and design methodologies of solid-state power converters.” Dr. Rashid is the recipient of the 1991 Outstanding Engineer Award from The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He received the 2002 IEEE Educational Activity Award (EAB) Meritorious Achievement Award in Continuing Education with the following citation "for contributions to the design and delivery of continuing education in power electronics and computer-aided-simulation". He is the recipient of the 2008 IEEE Undergraduate Teaching Award with citation: For his distinguished leadership and dedication to quality undergraduate electrical engineering education, motivating students and publication of outstanding textbooks. He is also the recipient of the IEEE 2013 Industry Applications Society Outstanding Achievement Award. Dr. Rashid is an ABET program evaluator for electrical and computer engineering (and also from 1995-2000) and was an engineering evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS, USA). He is also an ABET program evaluator for (general) engineering program. He is the Series Editors of Power Electronics and Applications, and Nanotechnology and Applications with the CRC Press. He serves as the Editorial Advisor of Electric Power and Energy with Elsevier Publishing. Also a Series editor of Energy Systems in Electrical Engineering with Springer Publishing. He lectures and conducts workshops on Outcome-Based Education (OBE) and its implementations including assessments. Dr. Rashid is a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Education Society and a Regional Speaker (previously Distinguished Lecture) for the IEEE Industrial Applications Society. He also authored a book on “The Process of Outcome-Based Education - Implementation, Assessment and Evaluations”.2012 UiTM Press, Malaysia.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Electrical Engineering, Florida Polytechnic University