Description

The First Edition of Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates has been immensely popular with students and researchers interested in freshwater biology and ecology, limnology, environmental science, invertebrate zoology, and related fields. The First Edition has been widely used as a textbook and this Second Edition should continue to serve students in advanced classes. The Second Edition features expanded and updated chapters, especially with respect to the cited references and the classification of North American freshwater invertebrates. New chapters or substantially revised chapters include those on freshwater ecosystems, snails, aquatic spiders, aquatic insects, and crustaceans.

Key Features

* Most up-to-date and informative text of its kind * Written by experts in the ecology of various invertebrate groups, coverage emphasizes ecological information within a current taxonomic framework * Each chapter contains both morphological and taxonomic information, including keys to North American taxa (usually to the generic level) as well as bibliographic information and a list of further readings * The text is geared toward researchers and advanced undergraduate and graduate students

Readership

Advanced undergraduates, graduate students, researchers, faculty and staff at universiities and consulting companies interested in freshwater biology and ecology, limnology, envionmental science, invertebrate zoology and related fields.

Details

No. of pages:
1056
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2001
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780080530673
Print ISBN:
9780126906479

About the editors

James Thorp

Dr. James H. Thorp has been a Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Kansas (Lawrence, KS, USA) and a Senior Scientist in the Kansas Biological Survey since 2001. Prior to returning to his alma mater, Prof. Thorp was a Distinguished Professor and Dean at Clarkson University, Department Chair and Professor at the University of Louisville, Associate Professor and Director of the Calder Ecology Center of Fordham University, Visiting Associate Professor at Cornell, and Research Ecologist at the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. He received his Baccalaureate from the University of Kansas (KU) and both Masters and Ph.D. degrees from North Carolina State. Those degrees focused on zoology, ecology, and marine biology, with an emphasis on the ecology of freshwater and marine invertebrates. Dr. Thorp is currently on the editorial board of two journals (River Research and Applications and River Systems) and is a former President of the International Society for River Science. He teaches freshwater, marine, and general ecological courses at KU, and his Masters and doctoral graduate students work on various aspects of the ecology of organisms, communities, and ecosystems in rivers, reservoirs, and wetlands. Prof. Thorp’s research interests and background are highly diverse and span the gamut from organismal biology to community, ecosystem, and macrosystem ecology. He works on both fundamental and applied research topics using descriptive, experimental, and modeling approaches in the field and lab. While his research emphasizes aquatic invertebrates, he also studies fish ecology, especially as related to food webs. He has published more than one hundred refereed journal articles, books, and chapters, including three single-volume editions of Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates (edited by J.H. Thorp and A.P. Covich) and the first volume (Ecology and General Biology) in the curr

Affiliations and Expertise

Kansas Biological Survey Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Kansas Lawrence, KS, USA

Alan Covich

Affiliations and Expertise

Colorado State University, Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology, Fort Collins, U.S.A.

Reviews

@from:From the Reviews of the First Edition: @qu:"This is a book by biologists for biologists, constructed with care, professionalism and detail. I found no chapter to be disappointing, and those covering the groups I know best were fair and helpful syntheses. This book will be immediately helpful to me and my graduate and senior undergraduate students; it will be a valuable reference in several of our biology courses such as limnology, ecology and invertebrate biology." @source:--QUARTERLY REVIEW OF BIOLOGY