Ecofriendly Pest Management for Food Security - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128032657, 9780128032664

Ecofriendly Pest Management for Food Security

1st Edition

Authors: Omkar
eBook ISBN: 9780128032664
Paperback ISBN: 9780128032657
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 18th February 2016
Page Count: 762
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Description

Ecofriendly Pest Management for Food Security explores the broad range of opportunity and challenges afforded by Integrated Pest Management systems. The book focuses on the insect resistance that has developed as a result of pest control chemicals, and how new methods of environmentally complementary pest control can be used to suppress harmful organisms while protecting the soil, plants, and air around them.

As the world’s population continues its rapid increase, this book addresses the production of cereals, vegetables, fruits, and other foods and their subsequent demand increase. Traditional means of food crop production face proven limitations and increasing research is turning to alternative means of crop growth and protection.

Key Features

  • Addresses environmentally focused pest control with specific attention to its role in food security and sustainability.
  • Includes a range of pest management methods, from natural enemies to biomolecules.
  • Written by experts with extensive real-world experience.

Readership

Graduate students of Zoology, Agriculture and other disciplines of Biological Sciences; researchers and policy makers in agriculture, food safety, and sustainability

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Insects and Pests
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Phytophagous Insects
    • 3. How Do Insects Influence Farm Economy?
    • 4. Benevolent Insects
    • 5. Insects as Vectors of Crops Diseases
    • 6. Insects for Civilization Change to Humanity
    • 7. Conclusions
  • Chapter 2. Biocontrol of Insect Pests
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Biocontrol: Meaning and Methods
    • 3. Biocontrol Agents
    • 4. Limitations of Biocontrol
    • 5. Legislation and Regulation of Biocontrol Agents
    • 6. Steps in Establishing a Biocontrol Program for Insect Pests
    • 7. Mistakes and Misunderstandings about Biocontrol
    • 8. Future of Biocontrol in IPM
    • 9. Conclusions
  • Chapter 3. Aphids and Their Biocontrol
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Aphids as Insect Pests
    • 3. Biointensive Management
    • 4. Biocontrol Agents of Aphids
    • 5. Constraints in Biocontrol
    • 6. Future of Biocontrol of Aphids
    • 7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 4. Parasitoids
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Historical Perspective
    • 3. Characteristics of Insect Parasitoids
    • 4. Biocontrol Strategies
    • 5. Mass Rearing of Parasitoids
    • 6. Future Aims
    • 7. Conclusions
  • Chapter 5. Trichogrammatids
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Taxonomy
    • 3. Molecular Characterization
    • 4. Genetic Improvement of Trichogrammatids
    • 5. Evaluation of Temperature-Tolerant Strains of Trichogrammatids
    • 6. Effect of Plant Extracts on Trichogrammatids
    • 7. Role of Synomones in Efficacy of Trichogrammatids
    • 8. Effect of Temperature on Trichogrammatids
    • 9. Effect of Insecticides on Trichogrammatids
    • 10. Utilization of Trichogrammatids
    • 11. Conclusions
  • Chapter 6. Anthocorid Predators
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Taxonomy of Indian Anthocoridae
    • 3. Anthocorids as Potential Bioagents
    • 4. Basic Studies
    • 5. Rearing
    • 6. Diapause
    • 7. Cold Storage
    • 8. Practical Utility
    • 9. Methods to Improve the Performance of Anthocorid Predators
    • 10. Compatibility of Anthocorids with Other Bioagents and/or Other Methods of Pest Management
    • 11. Conclusions
  • Chapter 7. Reduviid Predators
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Bioecology
    • 3. Pest Prey Record and Associated Behavior
    • 4. Biocontrol
    • 5. Insecticidal Impact
    • 6. Reduviids as General Predators
    • 7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 8. Syrphid Flies (The Hovering Agents)
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. What Are Syrphids?
    • 3. General Biology
    • 4. Reproductive Biology
    • 5. Foraging Behavior
    • 6. Growth and Development
    • 7. Intraguild Predation
    • 8. Improving Biocontrol
    • 9. Conclusion
  • Chapter 9. Ladybird Beetles
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Food and Feeding Habits in Ladybirds
    • 3. Mating and Reproduction
    • 4. Ladybirds in a Predatory Guild
    • 5. Semiochemicals and Ladybirds
    • 6. Effects of Abiotic Factors
    • 7. Biocontrol Prospects
    • 8. Conclusions
  • Chapter 10. Chrysopids
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. General Biology
    • 3. Influence of Biotic and Abiotic Factors
    • 4. Predation Efficiency
    • 5. Experimental Releases
    • 6. Rearing Techniques
    • 7. Storage Techniques
    • 8. Release Techniques
    • 9. Integrated Pest Management Programs Using Chrysopids
    • 10. Conclusions
  • Chapter 11. Mite Predators
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Important Pest Mite Families
    • 3. Control of Mite Pests
    • 4. Mite Predators in Natural Systems
    • 5. Finding Efficient Predators for Integrated Mite Management
    • 6. The Future of Biological Control of Mite Pests
    • 7. Conclusions
  • Chapter 12. Entomopathogenic Nematodes
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Taxonomy
    • 3. Life Cycle of EPNs
    • 4. Host Specificity
    • 5. Mode of Infection
    • 6. Host Resistance
    • 7. Factors Affecting Efficacy
    • 8. Behavioral Defense Strategies
    • 9. Morphological Defense Strategies
    • 10. Physiological Defense Strategies
    • 11. Pesticides
    • 12. Fungicides
    • 13. Mass Production
    • 14. Commercial Formulation
    • 15. Mass Multiplication and Formulation
    • 16. Storage
    • 17. Application Technology
    • 18. Field Efficacy
    • 19. Conclusion
  • Chapter 13. Insect Viruses
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Strategies for Biological Pest Control
    • 3. Entomopathogens in Biocontrol
    • 4. Insect Viruses
    • 5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 14. Bacillus thuringiensis
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. History
    • 3. Toxins
    • 4. Identification of Bt Strains
    • 5. Structure of Bt δ-Endotoxin Proteins and Genes
    • 6. Mode of Action of δ-Endotoxins
    • 7. Occurrences and Distribution
    • 8. Bt Delivery Systems
    • 9. Biosafety
    • 10. Management of Insect Resistance to Bt
    • 11. Economics of Bt Crops
    • 12. Conclusions
  • Chapter 15. Entomopathogenic Fungi
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Entomopathogenic Fungi
    • 3. Fungal Infection Process
    • 4. Formulation of Fungal Pesticides
    • 5. Application of Biotechnology
    • 6. Conclusions
  • Chapter 16. Plant Monoterpenoids (Prospective Pesticides)
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Chemistry of Essential Oils
    • 3. Monoterpenoids of Pesticidal Importance
    • 4. Commercial Aspects
    • 5. Stability of Essential Oil–based Pesticides
    • 6. Economics and Sustainability
    • 7. Health and Environmental Impacts
    • 8. Future Perspectives
  • Chapter 17. Antifeedant Phytochemicals in Insect Management (so Close yet so Far)
    • 1. Antifeedant Approach
    • 2. Sources and Chemistry
    • 3. Recently Isolated Feeding Deterrent Molecules
    • 4. Habituation of Feeding Deterrents
    • 5. Commercial Concepts
    • 6. Antifeedant Potential: Why so Close yet so Far?
    • 7. Conclusions
  • Chapter 18. Neem Products
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The Tree and Its Insecticidal Parts
    • 3. Active Constituents and Their Mode of Action
    • 4. Neem Industry
    • 5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 19. Semiochemicals
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Historical Background
    • 3. Semiochemicals: Research Techniques
    • 4. Pheromone Chemistry: Synthesis and Trap Designs
    • 5. Monitoring of Pests
    • 6. Mass Trapping
    • 7. Mating Disruption
    • 8. Parapheromones
    • 9. Plant Volatiles as Attractants or Repellents
    • 10. Antiaggregation Pheromone
    • 11. Autoconfusion
    • 12. Semiochemicals for Natural Enemies
    • 13. Conclusion
  • Chapter 20. Insect Hormones (as Pesticides)
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Physiology of Insect Molting
    • 3. Concept of Insect Growth Regulators
    • 4. Hormone Insecticides
    • 5. IGR in Pest Management
    • 6. Effect on Natural Enemies
    • 7. Effect on Bees and Pollinators
    • 8. Resistance to Insect Growth Regulators
    • 9. Conclusions
  • Chapter 21. Integrated Pest Management
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Losses due to Pests and Emerging Pest Problems
    • 3. Integrated Pest Management: Definition and Scope
    • 4. Concepts of IPM
    • 5. Tools and Inputs of IPM
    • 6. Legislative/Legal/Regulatory Methods of Pest Control
    • 7. Summary and Conclusions
  • Chapter 22. Biotechnological Approaches
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Genetic Engineering Approaches
    • 3. Protein Engineering Approaches
    • 4. Advancement in Proteomic Techniques
    • 5. Environmental Impact of Biotechnology
    • 6. Future Perspectives
  • Chapter 23. GMO and Food Security
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Genetically Modified Technology in Agriculture
    • 3. GM Technology and Animals
    • 4. GM Microorganisms in Food Production
    • 5. Studies on Food Safety
    • 6. Safety Issue with GMOs as Food
    • 7. Ecological Concerns
    • 8. Transgenics and Soil Microorganisms
    • 9. Conclusions
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
762
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128032664
Paperback ISBN:
9780128032657

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