Details

No. of pages:
417
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2002
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Print ISBN:
9780122207518
Electronic ISBN:
9780080494814

About the authors

Michael Donnenberg

Michael Donnenberg, MD is a Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Maryland. Dr. Donnenberg is a graduate of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed residency in Internal Medicine at what is now the Bayview Campus of Johns Hopkins and fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Tufts/New England Medical Center. After additional postdoctoral research training at the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland, Dr. Donnenberg joined the faculty in 1990. Dr. Donnenberg’s research has focused on the molecular pathogenesis of infections due to Escherichia coli and on the biogenesis and function of bacterial surface appendages called Type IV Pili that are used by many pathogens to adhere to host cell surfaces. His work has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health for over twenty years and has resulted in the publication of over one hundred original manuscripts, reviews, and book chapters. He is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Academy of Microbiology and a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. He is a recipient of the Oswald Avery Award from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. Donnenberg is an active Infectious Diseases clinician and directs the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Program at the University of Maryland. He is also active in medical education and was an inaugural member of the Pass and Susel Academy of Academic Excellence at the University of Maryland.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, U.S.A.

Michael Donnenberg

Michael Donnenberg, MD is a Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Maryland. Dr. Donnenberg is a graduate of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed residency in Internal Medicine at what is now the Bayview Campus of Johns Hopkins and fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Tufts/New England Medical Center. After additional postdoctoral research training at the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland, Dr. Donnenberg joined the faculty in 1990. Dr. Donnenberg’s research has focused on the molecular pathogenesis of infections due to Escherichia coli and on the biogenesis and function of bacterial surface appendages called Type IV Pili that are used by many pathogens to adhere to host cell surfaces. His work has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health for over twenty years and has resulted in the publication of over one hundred original manuscripts, reviews, and book chapters. He is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Academy of Microbiology and a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. He is a recipient of the Oswald Avery Award from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. Donnenberg is an active Infectious Diseases clinician and directs the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Program at the University of Maryland. He is also active in medical education and was an inaugural member of the Pass and Susel Academy of Academic Excellence at the University of Maryland.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, U.S.A.

Reviews

"...a thorough, timely treatise on the current state of the field for researchers and advanced graduate students in bacterial pathogenesis. It is also an excellent and valuable reference work of general interest to microbiologists, infectious disease specialists, and food safety experts, and should be included in microbiology and medical reference libraries."-ASM NEWS (June 2003) "...a very informative book which is well presented and would be excellent value for money for scientists generally interested in the basis of microbial pathogenesis, as well as E. coli specifically."-MICROBIOLOGY TODAY (August 2003)