Description

Domino Effects in the Process Industries discusses state-of-the-art theories, conceptual models, insights and practical issues surrounding large-scale knock-on accidents—so-called domino effects—in the chemical and process industries. The book treats such extremely low-frequency phenomena from a technological perspective, studying possible causes and introducing several approaches to assess and control the risks of these scenarios. The authors also examine these events from a managerial viewpoint, discussing single and multi-plant management insights and requirements to take pro-active measures to prevent such events. Academics, regulators, and industrialists who study and analyze domino effects in order to prevent such events will find the book unique and highly valuable.

Key Features

  • Outlines available methods in analyzing these events, aiding understanding of the accidents and their causes
  • Covers current modelling, control and management tactics of domino effects, -facilitating prevention
  • Identifies areas where new research is needed

Readership

Top- and line management within industrial sectors handling or storing hazardous substances, chemical engineers, bio-chemical engineers, environmental managers, safety and prevention managers, research centers on industrial safety and academic researchers.

Table of Contents

Preface

List of Contributors

1. Historical Background and State of the Art on Domino Effect Assessment

1.1 Historical Background and Importance of Research on Domino Effects

1.2 Safety and Security: Both Important for the Prevention of Domino Effects

1.3 Domino Effects and Chemical Industrial Areas

1.4 Contents of the Book

References

Part I: Causes of Domino Effects

2. Analysis of Past Accidents and Relevant Case-Histories

2.1 Introduction

2.2 The Analysis of Past Accidents

2.3 Domino Effect Surveys

2.4 Significance of Domino Effect in the Frame of all Accidents

2.5 Characteristics of Accidents Involving Domino Effect

2.6 Relevant Case Histories

2.7 The Analysis of Past Accidents, a Useful Resource

References

3. Features of Escalation Scenarios

3.1 Elements of a Domino Accident

3.2 Escalation as a Fundamental Feature of Relevant Domino Accidents

3.3 Sources of Domino Accidents and Primary Scenarios

3.4 Identification and Relative Ranking of Domino Targets and Secondary Scenarios

3.5 Domino Accident Definition

3.6 Categorization of Domino Accidents

3.7 Conclusions

References

4. Overpressure Effects

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Overview of the Basics

4.3 Nonlinear Dynamic Response Analysis

4.4 Domino Effects: Simplified Analysis

4.5 Response Regimes

4.6 Conclusions

References

5. Heat Radiation Effects

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Mechanisms of Escalation Triggered by Fire

5.3 Escalation Potential of Fire Scenarios

5.4 Modeling the Behavior of Equipment Exposed to Fire

5.5 Prevention of Escalation Caused by Fire

5.6 Conclusions

References

6. Missile Projection Effects

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Escalation Caused by Fragments

6

Details

No. of pages:
384
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2013
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780444543240
Print ISBN:
9780444543233

About the editors

Genserik Reniers

Affiliations and Expertise

Università di Bologna, DICAM, Laboratory for Industrial Safety and Environmental Sustainability

Valerio Cozzani

Affiliations and Expertise

Università di Bologna DICAM

Reviews

"Chemical, process, mechanical, and other engineers examine the phenomenon of a single, often simple accident cascading into a catastrophe in chemical processing operations. In sections of causes and prevention by technology and by management, they discuss such aspects as the analysis of past accidents and relevant case histories, heat radiation effects, a threshold-based approach, quantitative assessment of risk caused by domino accidents,.."--ProtoView.com, February 2014
"Chemical, process, mechanical, and other engineers examine the phenomenon of a single, often simple accident cascading into a catastrophe in chemical processing operations. In sections of causes and prevention by technology and by management, they discuss such aspects as the analysis of past accidents and relevant case histories, heat radiation effects, a threshold-based approach, quantitative assessment of risk caused by domino accidents, and decision support systems for preventing domino effects."--Reference & Research Book News, December 2013