Key Features

  • The ultimate reference source for clinical neurophysiologists on disorders of visual processing.
  • Volume in a prestigious series published in association with the International Federation of clinical Neurophysiology.
  • International contributor list drawn from around the world.
  • Discusses anatomy and physiology, techniques used in clinical neurophysiology, disorders of peripheral visual processing and disorders of central visual processing.

Table of Contents

Section 1 Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Visual System. Morphology and physiology of the retina. Anatomy and physiology of the visual pathways and cortex. Visual attention and visual awareness.
Section 2 Methodologies and techniques. Electroretinography. The multifocal electroretinogram. Visual evoked potentials. Oscillatory responses and gamma band activity. Visual evoked magneto potentials, visual evoked magnetic fields and magnetic stimulations of the visual cortex. Psychophysical techniques. Visual cognitive ERPs. Assessment of vision in infants and young children. Role of clinical neurophysiology in assessing both normal and pathological processing of visual information.
Section 3 Disorders of peripheral visual processing. Color vision deficiencies. Genetically determined disorders of retinal function. Acquired retinopathies. Experimental genetic disorders and visual neurophysiology.
Section 4 Disorders of central visual processing. Central disorders of visual processing - a pragmatic classification. Positive spontaneous visual phenomena. Optic neuropathies and disorders of optic chiasma. Visual field defects of central origin. Visual apperception and agnosia. Cortical blindness and visual anosognosia. Blindsight - hypotheses and clinical implications. Achromatopsia and chromatic blindsight. Visual disfunction in disorders with altered dopaminergic neurotransmission. Multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. Dementia and alzheimer's disease. Epilepsy and visual phenomena.
Section 5 Future advances. Future advances and applications.

Details

No. of pages:
563
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2005
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
Print ISBN:
9780444512338
Electronic ISBN:
9780444529275

About the editor

Gastone Celesia

Dr. Celesia received his medical degree magna cum laude from the University of Genoa Medical School in Italy and his master of science degree from McGill University Faculty of Medicine in Montreal, Canada. He completed a Neurology residency at the Montreal Neurological Institute and a post-doctoral fellowship in Neurophysiology at the University of Wisconsin Madison. Dr. Celesia is board certified in Neurology. He is a member of several medical societies including the American Academy of Neurology, the American Neurological Association, and the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. He was President of the American Academy of Clinical Neurophysiology in 1993 to 1995. He was Editor-in-Chief of Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, an international medical journal from 1987 to 1999. Dr. Celesia has published more than 190 articles on neurological disorders and has been an invited speaker at various meetings both nationally and internationally. He has been a Professor of Neurology at the University of Wisconsin Madison from 1974 to 1982. At Loyola University of Chicago, Dr. Celesia was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurology and Director of the Laboratories of Clinical Neurophysiology from 1983 to 1999. In 2006 he was the recipient of the Herbert Jasper Award by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. He is internationally known for his research in auditory and visual disorders. In 1969 in collaboration with F. Puletti he mapped the auditory cortex of humans undergoing surgery for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. In 2005 he edited a book on “Disorders of Visual Processing” and in 2013 a book on Disorders of Peripheral and Central Auditory Processing both published by Elsevier, Amsterdam. Dr. Celesia has helped train many neurologists and clinical neurophysiologists. Four of his former fellows are now chairing department of neurology or neurophysiology. As a member of American Neurological Associat