Developmental Juvenile Osteology

Developmental Juvenile Osteology

2nd Edition - July 26, 2016

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  • Authors: Craig Cunningham, Louise Scheuer, Sue Black
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780123821065
  • eBook ISBN: 9780123821072

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Description

Developmental Juvenile Osteology was created as a core reference text to document the development of the entire human skeleton from early embryonic life to adulthood. In the period since its first publication there has been a resurgence of interest in the developing skeleton, and the second edition of Developmental Juvenile Osteology incorporates much of the key literature that has been published in the intervening time. The main core of the text persists by describing each individual component of the human skeleton from its embryological origin through to its final adult form. This systematic approach has been shown to assist the processes of both identification and age estimation and acts as a core source for the basic understanding of normal human skeletal development. In addition to this core, new sections have been added where there have been significant advances in the field.

Key Features

  • Identifies every component of the juvenile skeleton, by providing a detailed analysis of development and ageing and a detailed description of each bone in four ways: adult bone, early development, ossification and practical notes
  • New chapters and updated sections covering the dentition, age estimation in the living and bone histology
  • An updated bibliography documenting the research literature that has contributed to the field over the past
    15 years since the publication of the first edition
  • Heavily illustrated, including new additions

Readership

Researchers and students in anthropology and archaeology; forensic and medical scientists; and libraries

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Introduction: A Guide to the Text
    Chapter 2: Skeletal Development and Aging
    Chapter 3: Bone Development
    Chapter 4: Early Embryological Development
    Chapter 5: The Skull
    Chapter 6: Dentition
    Chapter 7: The Vertebral Column
    Chapter 8: The Thorax
    Chapter 9: The Pectoral Girdle
    Chapter 10: The Upper Limb
    Chapter 11: The Pelvic Girdle
    Chapter 12: The Lower Limb
    Appendix 1
    Appendix 2
    References
    Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 630
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2016
  • Published: July 26, 2016
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780123821065
  • eBook ISBN: 9780123821072

About the Authors

Craig Cunningham

Dr Craig Cunningham is a senior lecturer in Human Anatomy within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification at the University of Dundee. He holds a joint honours Bachelor of Science degree in Anatomical and Physiological Sciences and a Doctorate in Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology. He is an anatomist and practising forensic anthropologist accredited at FA1 level by the Royal Anthropological Institute. He has worked on a number of cases as a forensic anthropologist within the UK which has included the investigation of both adult and juvenile remains. He is involved in the teaching and supervision of undergraduate and postgraduate students in anatomy and forensic anthropology and has responsibility for the curation of the Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains housed within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification. His research involves investigating the growth and development of the human skeleton through the use of non-invasive imaging methods. He is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute and holds a Scottish Government license as a teacher of anatomy.

Affiliations and Expertise

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, UK

Louise Scheuer

Professor Louise Scheuer is a retired anatomist and forensic anthropologist who taught at several London medical schools including 20 years at St.Thomas’s Hospital Medical School and the Medical School of University College London. She is a past President of the British Association of Clinical Anatomists and holds an Honorary (Chair) Professorship at Dundee University.

She is a member of the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the British Association of Clinical Anatomy and a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute and of the Royal Society of Medicine.

She and Sue (Prof.) Black held a Leverhulme Grant for the conservation and re-evaluation of the St. Bride’s Church skeletal collection.

She has worked with forensic pathologists, coroners and police on the identification of human remains and was a forensic anthropologist in the British Foreign and Commonwealth Team investigating war crimes in Kosovo in 1999 and the team examining the 7/7 London tube bombings in 2005. She is the past Chairman of the Forensic Examination Committee of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Affiliations and Expertise

Centre for Anatomy and Human identification, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, UK

Sue Black

Professor Sue Black is Director of the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification at the University of Dundee, Director of the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science and Deputy Principal for public engagement. She is a forensic anthropologist and an anatomist, founder and past President of the British Association for Human Identification, and advisor to the Home Office and Interpol on issues pertaining to forensic anthropology in disaster victim identification (DVI). She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute, a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (Edinburgh), a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology and a certified forensic anthropologist. She was awarded an OBE in 2001 for her services to forensic anthropology in Kosovo, the Lucy Mair medal for humanitarian services and a police commendation for DVI training in 2008, Hon Prof of Anatomy for the Royal Scottish Academy in 2014 and the Fletcher of Saltoun award for her contribution to Scottish culture also in 2014. She was awarded both the Brian Cox and the Stephen Fry awards for public engagement with research and in 2013 her Centre was awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education. In 2015 she was awarded a £10M grant from the Leverhulme Trust to set up a research centre for forensic science.

Affiliations and Expertise

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, UK

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