Development in Wastewater Treatment Research and Processes

Development in Wastewater Treatment Research and Processes

Microbial Degradation of Xenobiotics through Bacterial and Fungal Approach

1st Edition - February 16, 2022

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  • Editors: Maulin Shah, Susana Rodriguez-Couto
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323858397
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323897938

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Description

Development in Wastewater Treatment Research and Processes: Microbial Degradation of Xenobiotics through Bacterial and Fungal Approach covers the active and applicable role that bacteria and fungi play in the degradation of xenobiotic compounds from the environment. The book gives up-to-date information on recent advancements in the field of environmental xenobiotics and how they disturb a plant's metabolism. The book also gives information on aerobic and anaerobic degradation of xenobiotic compounds through bacteria or fungi and/or a combined approach. Finally, the book covers the characteristics of environmental microbiology, biochemical engineering, agricultural microbiology, environmental engineering, and soil bioremediation.

Key Features

  • Emphasizes up-to-date research on the microbial degradation of xenobiotic compounds through a bacterial-fungal approach
  • Covers multidisciplinary features of environmental microbiology, biochemical engineering, agriculture microbiology, environmental engineering and soil bioremediation
  • Includes sections on aerobic and anaerobic degradation
  • Presents the significance of the bacterial-fungal role and their metabolic activities in the digestion of xenobiotic compounds
  • Focuses on the most recent developments in environmental biotechnology to enhance the action of the bacterial-fungal systems in the remediation of xenobiotic compounds

Readership

Researchers, Environmentalists, Microbiologists, Biotechnologists, Environmental Engineers, Waste Treatment Engineers and Managers, Scientists. Environmental Science Managers, Administrators, and Policy Makers, Environmental Consultants, Industry Persons and Doctoral Level who aspire to work on the treatment and reuse of sewage sludge for environmental safety and sustainable development

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1. Microbial degradation of xenobiotics in bioelectrochemical systems
  • 1.1. Introduction to xenobiotics
  • 1.2. Conventional processes of xenobiotics degradation and their drawbacks
  • 1.3. Xenobiotics degradation in bioelectrochemical systems
  • 1.4. Challenges faced
  • 1.5. Summary
  • 1.6. Conclusion
  • Chapter 2. Bacterial and fungal degradation of dyes: a remedial source
  • 2.1. Introduction
  • 2.2. Classification of dyes
  • 2.3. Environmental and health problems associated with dyes
  • 2.4. Conventional methods of dye removal
  • 2.5. Bacterial degradation of dye
  • 2.6. Mechanism of dye degradation via bacteria
  • 2.7. Factors affecting bacterial degradation of dyes
  • 2.8. Bacterial bioreactors for decolorization and degradation of dyes
  • 2.9. Fungal degradation of dye
  • 2.10. Mechanism of dye degradation via fungi
  • 2.11. Factors affecting fungal degradation
  • 2.12. Fungal bioreactors for decolorization and degradation of dyes
  • 2.13. Conclusion and future prospects
  • Chapter 3. Role of halophiles in xenobiotic bioremediation
  • 3.1. Xenobiotic compounds
  • 3.2. Halophiles—an extremophle in action
  • 3.3. Metal bioremediation by halophiles
  • 3.4. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons including crude oils
  • 3.5. Bioremediation of crude oil
  • 3.6. Aliphatic hydrocarbon
  • 3.7. Monoaromatic hydrocarbon
  • 3.8. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon
  • 3.9. Conclusion
  • Chapter 4. Fungal diversity in the bioremediation of toxic effluents
  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. Methods of bioremediation
  • 4.3. Steps of mycoremediation
  • 4.4. Kinds of bioremediators
  • 4.5. Factors affecting mycoremediation
  • 4.6. Different types of targeted contaminants
  • 4.7. Enzymes involved in bioremediation
  • 4.8. Recent advancements in fungal bioremediation
  • 4.9. Conclusion and future perspective
  • Chapter 5. Current advances in microbial bioremediation of surface and ground water contaminated by hydrocarbon
  • 5.1. Introduction
  • 5.2. Microbial bioremediation of hydrocarbon (petroleum) contaminated water
  • 5.3. Challenges and recommendations
  • 5.4. Conclusions and future prospects
  • Chapter 6. Microbial remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in liquid wastes
  • 6.1. Introduction
  • 6.2. Classification and composition of petroleum oil
  • 6.3. Impact of petroleum hydrocarbons on environment
  • 6.4. Remediation techniques
  • 6.5. Microbial degradation petroleum oil
  • 6.6. Sources of microbes
  • 6.7. Role of enzymes
  • 6.8. Role of biosurfactants in degrading hydrocarbon
  • 6.9. Factors affecting the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon
  • 6.10. Advantages of microbial remediation technique
  • 6.11. Conclusion and future prospects
  • Chapter 7. Microbial remediation of metals by marine bacteria
  • 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. Heavy metal toxicity
  • 7.3. Removal of toxic metals by marine microbes
  • 7.4. Conclusions and future perspectives
  • Chapter 8. Microbial degradation of dye-containing wastewater
  • 8.1. Introduction
  • 8.2. Dye
  • 8.3. Classification of dyes
  • 8.4. Sources of hazardous dyes in the environment
  • 8.5. Mode of toxicity of dye in human health
  • 8.6. Microbial interaction with dyes
  • 8.7. Bacterial interaction with dye
  • 8.8. Fungal interaction with dye
  • 8.9. Bioremediation strategies of dyes
  • 8.10. Bacterial degradation of dyes
  • 8.11. Fungal degradation of dyes
  • 8.12. Hurdles on dye bioremediation
  • 8.13. Future prospects
  • Chapter 9. Microbial bioremediation of heavy metals by Marine bacteria
  • 9.1. Introduction
  • 9.2. Types of marine bacteria involved in metal bioremediation
  • 9.3. Mechanism of microbial bioremediation of metals
  • 9.4. Microbial bioremediation and its mechanism
  • 9.5. Microbial remediation of heavy metals from the soil
  • 9.6. Microbial bioremediation of metals from water
  • 9.7. Advantages and disadvantages of microbial bioremediation
  • 9.8. Bioleaching (biomining)
  • 9.9. Phytoremediation
  • 9.10. Plant microbial bioremediation
  • 9.11. Heavy metal removal by fungi
  • 9.12. Metal uptake by fungi
  • 9.13. Heavy metal removal by Algae
  • 9.14. Factors affecting heavy metal bioremediation by algae (Table 9.6)
  • 9.15. Factors affecting the microbial bioremediation of heavy metals
  • 9.16. Conclusion and Future prospects
  • Chapter 10. Role of microbes in biodegradation of cyanide and its metal complexes
  • 10.1. Introduction
  • 10.2. Cyanide
  • 10.3. Factors responsible for the biodegradation of cyanides
  • 10.4. Microbial metabolism
  • 10.5. Advances in cyanide biodegradation technologies
  • 10.6. Conclusion and future prospects
  • Chapter 11. Microbial-mediated explosives removal and its impact on TNT, RDX, and HMX
  • 11.1. Introduction
  • 11.2. Classification of explosives
  • 11.3. The problem with explosives
  • 11.4. Impact of explosives on the environment
  • 11.5. An overview of the environmental fate of explosives
  • 11.6. Bioremediation of explosives
  • 11.7. Limitations, future prospects, and conclusion
  • Chapter 12. Advancement in microbial bioremediation
  • 12.1. Introduction
  • 12.2. Xenobiotics and role of microbes
  • 12.3. Parameters for biodegradation
  • 12.4. Approaches to bioremediation
  • 12.5. Improving the process of biodegradation
  • 12.6. Omics approaches in the microbial bioremediation
  • 12.7. Conclusion and future prospective
  • Chapter 13. Counterbalancing common explosive pollutants (TNT, RDX, and HMX) in the environment by microbial degradation
  • 13.1. Introduction
  • 13.2. TNT
  • 13.3. RDX and HMX
  • 13.4. Conclusion
  • 13.5. Future research
  • Chapter 14. Enzyme-based biodegradation of toxic environmental pollutants
  • 14.1. Introduction
  • 14.2. Structure of enzymes
  • 14.3. Mode of action of enzymes
  • 14.4. Classification and nomenclature
  • 14.5. Industrial pollution and their impact on the ecosystem
  • 14.6. Conclusion
  • Chapter 15. Cyanoremediation: a clean and green approach toward the sustainable environment
  • 15.1. Introduction
  • 15.2. Cyanobacteria at a glance
  • 15.3. Cyanobacteria as potential food, feed, and bioenergy source
  • 15.4. Cyanoremediation—a clean and green technology toward sustainable future
  • 15.5. Conclusion
  • Chapter 16. Enzymatic bioremediation: current status, challenges, future prospects, and applications
  • 16.1. Introduction
  • 16.2. Bioremediation—aspects and techniques
  • 16.3. Enzymes for bioremediation
  • 16.4. Modified enzymes for bioremediation—genetic engineering/enzyme engineering
  • 16.5. Enzyme immobilization
  • 16.6. Advances on an innovation on enzymatic bioremediation
  • Chapter 17. An approach toward the biodegradation of PAHs by microbial consortia
  • 17.1. Introduction
  • 17.2. PAH-degrading pathways by different bacteria and fungi
  • 17.3. Removal of PAHs from the soil by bacteria
  • 17.4. Effect of incomplete combustion of PAHs on microbial and fungal consortia
  • 17.5. Proteomics and metabolomics in bioremediation of PAHs
  • 17.6. Limiting factors of PAHs degradation
  • 17.7. Remediation strategy for limiting factors
  • 17.8. Review on physicochemical treatments
  • 17.9. Conclusion and future aspects
  • Chapter 18. Bacterial- and fungal-mediated biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil
  • 18.1. Introduction
  • 18.2. Composition of petroleum hydrocarbons
  • 18.3. Impact of petroleum hydrocarbon on soil
  • 18.4. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon
  • 18.5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 19. Deep-marine bacteria—The Frontier alternative for heavy metals bioremediation
  • 19.1. Introduction
  • 19.2. Sources of heavy metals
  • 19.3. Characteristics and diversity of deep-marine bacteria
  • 19.4. Deep-marine bacteria adaptation concerning changing environmental conditions
  • 19.5. Heavy metal removal by deep-marine bacteria
  • 19.6. Application of deep-marine bacteria in bioremediation
  • 19.7. Bioremediation enhancement via genetically modified deep-marine bacteria
  • 19.8. Future prospective also pros and cons of using deep-marine bacteria
  • 19.9. Conclusion
  • Chapter 20. Microbial biofilms for waste treatment and sustainable development
  • 20.1. Introduction
  • 20.2. Biofilms in bioremediation
  • 20.3. Oil bioremediation
  • 20.4. Textile wastewater treatment
  • 20.5. Removal of pharmaceuticals
  • 20.6. Bioremediation of persistent organic pollutants
  • 20.7. Heavy metal remediation
  • 20.8. Limitations and future prospect
  • 20.9. Conclusion
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 498
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: February 16, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323858397
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323897938

About the Editors

Maulin Shah

Dr. Maulin P. Shah is Chief Scientist and Head of the Industrial Waste Water Research Lab, Division of Applied and Environmental Microbiology Lab at Enviro Technology Ltd., Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India. His work focuses on the impact of industrial pollution on the microbial diversity of wastewater following cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent analysis. His major work involves isolation, screening, identification, and genetically engineering high-impact microbes for the degradation of hazardous materials. His research interests include biological wastewater treatment, environmental microbiology, biodegradation, bioremediation, and phytoremediation of environmental pollutants from industrial wastewaters. He has published more than 250 research papers in national and international journals of repute on various aspects of microbial biodegradation and bioremediation of environmental pollutants. He is the editor of more than 50 books of international repute (Elsevier, Springer, RSC, and CRC Press). He is an active editorial board member in top-rated journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Gujarat, India

Susana Rodriguez-Couto

Susana Rodríguez-Couto (female) got her B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Chemistry (Industrial Chemistry) from the University of Santiago de Compostela in 1992 and her Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1999 from the University of Vigo, obtaining the maximal grade (magna cum laude) and, in addition, she was awarded with the Extraordinary Prize for Doctoral Thesis in Chemistry. She worked as an Associate Professor and an Isidro Parga Pondal Senior Researcher at the University of Vigo (2000-2004), as a Ramón y Cajal Senior Researcher at Rovira i Virgili University (2004-2008) and as an Ikerbasque Research Professor (2009-2019). She has also worked as an Invited Researcher at the Institute from Environmental Biotechnology, Graz University of Technology (Austria) and at the Department of Biological Engineering, University of Minho (Portugal). In 2008, she received the I3 Professor from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Education to the recognition of an outstanding research activity. In March 2021 she is joining LUT School of Engineering Science at Mikkeli, Finland, as a Full Professor in biological water treatment. She has published more than 140 articles in highly reputed international journals (h index 42). She is editor of several journals (3Biotech, Frontiers) and 14 Elsevier books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Full Professor (Biological Water Treatment), Department of Separation Science, LUT School of Engineering Science, LUT University, Finland

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