Description

Learning styles are highly relevant for students in the online environment. Designing Effective Library Tutorials provides examples of, and steps for, how to create tutorials that match learning styles, based on usability studies of students from various cultural groups and styles of learning. The book presents studies, practical suggestions, and examples to assist librarians and faculty as they develop online programs for students from diverse learning styles. Research on learning style preferences in the online environment emphasizes the need to provide a variety of methods that include text, aural, visual, and kinesthetic examples. Geared for the practitioner working in online learning, the book summarizes current literature, and presents best practices for designing effective online tools for diverse learners, including suggestions for assessment of learning objects.

This title is structured into twelve chapters, covering: The learning style debate: do we need to match up learning styles with presentation styles? Overview of learning style theories and learning style results from various studies; The intersection of culture and learning styles; The need for learning object development; Current practice: categories and features of library tutorials; Effective design of learning objects; Pedagogical considerations for tutorials; Interactivity options for tutorials; Assessment of learning objects; The value and process of usability studies; Marketing learning objects for broad visibility; and a section on resources.

Key Features

  • Provides results from usability studies conducted with students that assess learning style and the resulting effectiveness of tutorials based on their preferred style
  • Compares approaches and software used by librarians and educators to create tutorials, along with examples of pitfalls and benefits of each for various learning styles
  • Incorporates examples of ways to use software while including learning objects to match learning style

Readership

Librarians and educators who create, develop, or prepare materials to be used online

Table of Contents

List of figures, tables and charts

Acknowledgements

About the author

Introduction: matching online learning and tutorial design with learning styles - the student perspective

Chapter 1: The learning styles debate: do we need to match up learning styles with presentation styles?

Abstract:

Introduction

Learning gains?

Are learning styles measurable?

Criticisms of tailoring instruction based on learning styles

Does knowing a student’s learning style make teachers more effective?

Should we match teaching style to the content being taught?

Solutions and compromises regardless of the controversy

Conclusion

Chapter 2: Overview of learning style theories and learning style results from the Mestre study

Abstract:

Introduction

Learning style models and inventories

Discussion

Conclusion

Chapter 3: The intersection of culture and learning styles

Abstract:

Introduction

Some examples of the relevance of culture and learning styles

Global and analytical learners

Culturally responsive instruction

Suggestions for accommodating various cultural and learning styles

Conclusion

Chapter 4: The need for learning object development

Abstract:

Introduction

Learning objects, web-based instruction, and tutorials

Benefits of learning objects

Tutorials for teaching faculty

Challenges of creating learning objects

Overview of the faculty’s or librarian’s role in creating tutorials

Access to existing tutorials

Students’ perceptions of learning objects

Personalization

Conclusion

Chapter 5: Current practice: categories and features of library tutorials

Abstract:

Introduction

Web-based tutorials with screenshots

Tutorials created with screencasting soft

Details

No. of pages:
360
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2012
Published:
Imprint:
Chandos Publishing
Print ISBN:
9781843346883
Electronic ISBN:
9781780633251

About the editor

Lori Mestre

Lori S. Mestre is an Associate Professor of Library Administration and the Head of the Undergraduate Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition to her M.A.L.S. degree, she has a doctorate specializing in language, culture and curriculum and has devoted the last 15 years to exploring the intersection between multicultural librarianship and online learning environments that best reflect the diverse needs of students.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Reviews

"The book is complemented throughout by examples to illustrate points made, results of a usability study conducted by the author and useful reference lists…Overall, this is definitely a must read for those wanting to explore the process of designing effective library tutorials."--The Australian Library Journal, Vol. 63, No. 1, 2014