Database Transaction Models for Advanced Applications - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781558602144, 9780080503776

Database Transaction Models for Advanced Applications

1st Edition

Editors: Ahmed Elmagarmid
Hardcover ISBN: 9781558602144
eBook ISBN: 9780080503776
Imprint: Morgan Kaufmann
Published Date: 1st April 1992
Page Count: 611
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Institutional Access


Table of Contents

Database Transaction Models for Advanced Applications
Edited by Ahmed K. Elmagarmid

  • Foreword by Jim Gray
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 Transaction Management in Database Systems
  • D. Agrawal and A. El Abbadi
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Execution atomicity
      • 1.2.1 Motivation
      • 1.2.2 Serializability
      • 1.2.3 Conflict Serializability
    • 1.3 Failure Atomicity
      • 1.3.1 Transaction Failures
      • 1.3.2 System Failures
    • 1.4 Distributed Databases
    • 1.5 Extensions to the Transaction Model
      • 1.5.1 Multiversion Databases
      • 1.5.2 Nested Transaction Model
      • 1.5.3 Transaction Models for Abstract Objects
    • 1.6 Concluding Remarks
  • 2 Introduction to Advanced Transaction Models
  • Ahmed K. Elmagarmid, Yungho Leu, James G. Mullen, and Omran Bukhres
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Advanced Transaction Models
      • 2.2.1 Cooperative Transaction Hierarchy
      • 2.2.2 Cooperative SEE Transactions
      • 2.2.3 DOM Transactions
      • 2.2.4 A Transaction Model for an Open Publication Environment
      • 2.2.5 ConTract Model
      • 2.2.6 Split-Transactions
      • 2.2.7 Flex Transaction Model
      • 2.2.8 ACTA
      • 2.2.9 Transaction Tool Kits
      • 2.2.10 S Transactions
      • 2.2.11 Multilevel and Open Nested Transactions
      • 2.2.12 Polytransactions
    • 2.3 Summary of Transaction Models
  • 3 A Cooperative Transaction Model for Design Databases
  • Marian H. Nodine, Sridhar Ramaswamy, and Stanley B. Zdonik
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Characteristics of the Transaction Model
      • 3.2.1 Hierarchical Organization of Transactions
      • 3.2.2 Correctness Criteria
      • 3.2.3 Multi-copy versus Single-copy system
      • 3.2.4 Operation-Based Recovery
    • 3.3 The Model
      • 3.3.1 Transaction Groups
      • 3.3.2 Cooperative Transactions
      • 3.3.3 Operations
      • 3.3.4 Histories
    • 3.4 Correctness
      • 3.4.1 Patterns and Conflicts
      • 3.4.2 LR(O) Grammars and DPDAs
      • 3.4.3 Correct Transaction Group Histories
    • 3.5 Example
    • 3.6 Synchronization
      • 3.6.1 Algorithm
      • 3.6.2 Example
      • 3.6.3 Checkpointing
    • 3.7 Recovery
      • 3.7.1 Dependency Maintenance and Logging
      • 3.7.2 Algorithm
    • 3.8 Related Research
    • 3.9 Summary
  • 4 A Flexible Framework for Transaction Management in Engineering Environments
  • Sandra Heiler, Sara Haradhvala, Stanley Zdonik, Barbara Blaustein, and Arnon Rosenthal
    • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.1.1 Motivation
      • 4.1.2 Summary of the Approach
      • 4.1.3 An Example of Transaction Management in a Simple Organization
      • 4.1.4 Related Work
    • 4.2 The Model
      • 4.2.1 Overview
      • 4.2.2 Semantics of Request Processing
      • 4.2.3 Request Processing by the TMH
      • 4.2.4 Framework Services and Their Interfaces
    • 4.3 Protocols for Software Engineering Environments-Approaches and Idioms
      • 4.3.1 Specifying Protocols
      • 4.3.2 Deadlock Prevention/Detection
      • 4.3.3 Limiting Sharing
      • 4.3.4 Triggering Copies and Merges
    • 4.4 Results and Status
  • 5 A Transaction Model for Active Distributed Object Systems
  • Alejandro Buchmann, M. Tamer Ozsu, Mark Hornick, Dimitrios Georgakopoulos, and Frank A. Manola
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 A Characterization of Transaction Schemes
      • 5.2.1 Correctness Criteria
      • 5.2.2 Transaction Models
    • 5.3 The DOM Transaction Model
      • 5.3.1 Example of a DOM Transaction
      • 5.3.2 Multitransactions
      • 5.3.3 Nested Transactions
      • 5.3.4 Compensating Transactions
      • 5.3.5 Contingency Transactions
      • 5.3.6 Vital and Non-vital Transactions
    • 5.4 Formal Specification of the Model
      • 5.4.1 Summary of the ACTA Formalism
      • 5.4.2 Multitransactions
      • 5.4.3 Nested Transactions
      • 5.4.4 Contingency Transactions
      • 5.4.5 Compensating Transactions
    • 5.5 Conclusions and Future Work
  • 6 A Transaction Model for an Open Publication Environment
  • Peter Muth, Thomas C. Rakow, Wolfgang Klas, and Erich J. Newhold
    • 6.1 Overview
    • 6.2 Introduction
    • 6.3 The Architecture of the Publication Environment and its Transaction Needs
      • 6.3.1 Architecture
      • 6.3.2 Requirements for the Transaction Model
    • 6.4 Transaction Model
      • 6.4.1 Object-Oriented Serializability
      • 6.4.2 Object-Oriented Concurrency Control
      • 6.4.3 Recovery
    • 6.5 Transactions in the Publication Environment
      • 6.5.1 Transaction Execution
      • 6.5.2 The Impact of Distribution
      • 6.5.3 The Impact of Heterogeneity
    • 6.6 Conclusion
  • 7 The ConTract Model
  • Helmut Wächter and Andreas Reuter
    • 7.1 Introduction and Overview
    • 7.2 Transaction Support for Large Distributed Applications
    • 7.3 ConTracts
      • 7.3.1 Modelling Control Flow: Scripts and Steps
      • 7.3.2 ConTract Programming Model
      • 7.3.3 Transaction Model
      • 7.3.4 User Interface for Controlling Large Distributed Applications
      • 7.3.5 Forward Recovery and Context Management
      • 7.3.6 Consistency Control and Resource Conflict Resolution
      • 7.3.7 Compensation
      • 7.3.8 Synchronization with Invariants
    • 7.4 Implementation Issues
      • 7.4.1 Flow Management
      • 7.4.2 Transaction Management
      • 7.4.3 Logging
      • 7.4.4 Synchronization
      • 7.4.5 Transactional Communication Service
    • 7.5 Comparison with Other Work
      • 7.5.1 Structural Extensions
      • 7.5.2 Embedding Transactions in an Execution Environment
    • 7.6 Conclusions
    • 7.7 Sample Script
  • 8 Dynamic Restructuring of Transactions
  • Gail E. Kaiser and Calton Pu
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Requirements
    • 8.3 Programmed Transactions
      • 8.3.1 Definitions
      • 8.3.2 Nested Transactions
    • 8.4 User-Controlled Transactions
    • 8.5 Applications
      • 8.5.1 Editing
      • 8.5.2 Design Environments
      • 8.5.3 Multi-User Design Environments
    • 8.6 Implementation Issues
    • 8.7 Comparison to Related Work
    • 8.8 Conclusions
  • 9 Multidatabase Transaction and Query Processing in Logic
  • Eva Kühn, Franz Puntigam, and Ahmed K. Elmargarmid
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Representation of MDBS Queries in Prolog
      • 9.2.1 Dynamic and Static Integration
    • 9.3 Transaction Control with Logic Programming
      • 9.3.1 The Flex Transaction Model
      • 9.3.2 Parallel Logic Programming
    • 9.4 Query and Transaction Processing in VPL
      • 9.4.1 Architecture
      • 9.4.2 Operational Semantics of the VPL Language
      • 9.4.3 Mapping Transactions into VPL Queries
    • 9.5 Extending the Power of Flex Transactions
    • 9.6 Conclusions
  • 10 ACTA: The Saga Continues
  • Panos K. Chrysanthis and Krithi Ramamritham
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 The Formal ACTA Framework
      • 10.2.1 Preliminaries
      • 10.2.2 Effects of Transactions on Other Transactions
      • 10.2.3 Objects and the Effects of Transactions on Objects
    • 10.3 Characterization of Atomic Transactions
    • 10.4 Characterization of Sagas
      • 10.4.1 A Special Case of Sagas
    • 10.5 Variations of the Sagas Model
      • 10.5.1 Sagas with no Special Relation with Last Component
      • 10.5.2 Sagas with Vital Components
      • 10.5.3 Sagas of Sagas
      • 10.5.4 Sagas with Non-Compensatable Components
    • 10.6 Conclusions
  • 11 A Transaction Manager Development Facility for Non Standard Database Systems
  • Rainer Unland and Gunter Schlangeter
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Transaction types
      • 11.2.1 Conventional transaction management
      • 11.2.2 The concept of nested transactions
      • 11.2.3 Fundamental rules of Moss' approach
    • 11.3 Basic concepts and fundamental rules of the tool kit approach
      • 11.3.1 Basic Concepts of the Tool Kit Approach
      • 11.3.2 Fundamental rules of the tool kit approach
    • 11.4 Characteristics of transaction types
      • 11.4.1 Concurrency control scheme
      • 11.4.2 Object visibility (access view and release view)
      • 11.4.3 Task
      • 11.4.4 Concurrent execution of children
      • 11.4.5 Explicit cooperation (collaboration)
      • 11.4.6 Recovery
      • 11.4.7 Example
    • 11.5 Lock modes
      • 11.5.1 Motivation of our approach
      • 11.5.2 Basic lock modes of the tool kit approach
      • 11.5.3 The two effects of a lock
      • 11.5.4 Locks in the context of nested transactions
      • 11.5.5 Object related locks
      • 11.5.6 Subject related lock
    • 11.6 General rules of the tool kit approach
    • 11.7 Brief overview of the structure of the tool kit
    • 11.8 Concluding remarks
  • 12 The S-Transaction Model
  • Jar Veijalainen, Frank Eliassen, and Bernhard Holtkamp
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2. Autonomous environments and their requirements
      • 12.2.1 Basic definitions of autonomy
      • 12.2.2 O-autonomy
      • 12.2.3 D-and M-autonomy and heterogeneity
      • 12.2.4 C-autonomy
      • 12.2.5 E-autonomy and erroneous and correct behavior
    • 12.3 A gross architecture supporting S-transactions
      • 12.3.1 Requirements for a transaction model coping with autonomy
      • 12.3.2 The site architecture
      • 12.3.3 The overall distributed architecture
    • 12.4 Properties of S-transactions
      • 12.4.1 A semi-formal model for the S-transactions
      • 12.4.2 Syntactical correctness of S-transactions
      • 12.4.3 Atomicity of S-transactions
      • 12.4.4 Consistency preservation of S-transactions
      • 12.4.5 Compensatability of local sub-S-transactions
    • 12.5 A language supporting S-transactions, STDL
      • 12.5.1 STDL/DDL
      • 12.5.2 STDL/DML
      • 12.5.3 Compensation
    • 12.6 Applications of the S-transaction model
      • 12.6.1 Banking
      • 12.6.2 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
      • 12.6.3 Software Engineering
    • 12.7 Further developments
      • 12.7.1 FRIL
      • 12.7.2 The computational model of FRIL
    • 12.8 Conclusion
  • 13 Concepts and Applications of Multilevel Transactions and Open Nested Transactions
  • Gerhard Weikum and Hans-J. Schek
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 The Multilevel Transaction Model
      • 13.2.1 Concepts of Multilevel Transactions
      • 13.2.2 Limits of Multilevel Transactions
      • 13.2.3. A Summary of the Multilevel Transaction Theory
      • 13.2.4 Implementation Issues
    • 13.3 The General Case of Open Nested Transactions
    • 13.4 Relaxing the ACID Paradigm
      • 13.4.1 Consistency-preservation
      • 13.4.2 Isolation
      • 13.4.3 Atomicity
      • 13.4.4 Persistence
    • 13.5 Applications of Open Nested Transactions
      • 13.5.1 Extensible Database Systems
      • 13.5.2 Federated Database Systems
      • 13.5.3 Exploiting Operating-System Transactions
      • 13.5.4 Object-oriented Database Systems
      • 13.5.5 Intra-transaction Parallelism
    • 13.6 An Application Study: Office Document Filing and Retrieval
    • 13.7 Conclusion
  • 14 Using Polytransactions to Manage Interdependent Data
  • Amit P. Sheth, Marek Rusinkiewicz, and George Karabatis
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Specification of Interdatabase Dependencies
    • 14.3 Polytransactions for Managing Interdependent Data
      • 14.3.1 System Architecture
      • 14.3.2 The Concept and Properties of Polytransactions
      • 14.3.3 Executing Polytransactions
    • 14.4 Interdatabase Dependency Schema
      • 14.4.1 Specification of the Dependency Predicate
      • 14.4.2 Specification of Mutual Consistency Requirements
      • 14.4.3 Specification of consistency restoration procedures
      • 14.4.4 Correctness of Dependency Specifications
    • 14.5 Consistency of Interdependent Data
      • 14.5.1 Definition of Consistency of Interdependent Data
    • 14.6 Summary
  • Biography
  • Subject Index
  • Author Index

Description

Database Transaction Models for Advanced Applications
Edited by Ahmed K. Elmagarmid

  • Foreword by Jim Gray
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1 Transaction Management in Database Systems
  • D. Agrawal and A. El Abbadi
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Execution atomicity
      • 1.2.1 Motivation
      • 1.2.2 Serializability
      • 1.2.3 Conflict Serializability
    • 1.3 Failure Atomicity
      • 1.3.1 Transaction Failures
      • 1.3.2 System Failures
    • 1.4 Distributed Databases
    • 1.5 Extensions to the Transaction Model
      • 1.5.1 Multiversion Databases
      • 1.5.2 Nested Transaction Model
      • 1.5.3 Transaction Models for Abstract Objects
    • 1.6 Concluding Remarks
  • 2 Introduction to Advanced Transaction Models
  • Ahmed K. Elmagarmid, Yungho Leu, James G. Mullen, and Omran Bukhres
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Advanced Transaction Models
      • 2.2.1 Cooperative Transaction Hierarchy
      • 2.2.2 Cooperative SEE Transactions
      • 2.2.3 DOM Transactions
      • 2.2.4 A Transaction Model for an Open Publication Environment
      • 2.2.5 ConTract Model
      • 2.2.6 Split-Transactions
      • 2.2.7 Flex Transaction Model
      • 2.2.8 ACTA
      • 2.2.9 Transaction Tool Kits
      • 2.2.10 S Transactions
      • 2.2.11 Multilevel and Open Nested Transactions
      • 2.2.12 Polytransactions
    • 2.3 Summary of Transaction Models
  • 3 A Cooperative Transaction Model for Design Databases
  • Marian H. Nodine, Sridhar Ramaswamy, and Stanley B. Zdonik
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Characteristics of the Transaction Model
      • 3.2.1 Hierarchical Organization of Transactions
      • 3.2.2 Correctness Criteria
      • 3.2.3 Multi-copy versus Single-copy system
      • 3.2.4 Operation-Based Recovery
    • 3.3 The Model
      • 3.3.1 Transaction Groups
      • 3.3.2 Cooperative Transactions
      • 3.3.3 Operations
      • 3.3.4 Histories
    • 3.4 Correctness
      • 3.4.1 Patterns and Conflicts
      • 3.4.2 LR(O) Grammars and DPDAs
      • 3.4.3 Correct Transaction Group Histories
    • 3.5 Example
    • 3.6 Synchronization
      • 3.6.1 Algorithm
      • 3.6.2 Example
      • 3.6.3 Checkpointing
    • 3.7 Recovery
      • 3.7.1 Dependency Maintenance and Logging
      • 3.7.2 Algorithm
    • 3.8 Related Research
    • 3.9 Summary
  • 4 A Flexible Framework for Transaction Management in Engineering Environments
  • Sandra Heiler, Sara Haradhvala, Stanley Zdonik, Barbara Blaustein, and Arnon Rosenthal
    • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.1.1 Motivation
      • 4.1.2 Summary of the Approach
      • 4.1.3 An Example of Transaction Management in a Simple Organization
      • 4.1.4 Related Work
    • 4.2 The Model
      • 4.2.1 Overview
      • 4.2.2 Semantics of Request Processing
      • 4.2.3 Request Processing by the TMH
      • 4.2.4 Framework Services and Their Interfaces
    • 4.3 Protocols for Software Engineering Environments-Approaches and Idioms
      • 4.3.1 Specifying Protocols
      • 4.3.2 Deadlock Prevention/Detection
      • 4.3.3 Limiting Sharing
      • 4.3.4 Triggering Copies and Merges
    • 4.4 Results and Status
  • 5 A Transaction Model for Active Distributed Object Systems
  • Alejandro Buchmann, M. Tamer Ozsu, Mark Hornick, Dimitrios Georgakopoulos, and Frank A. Manola
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 A Characterization of Transaction Schemes
      • 5.2.1 Correctness Criteria
      • 5.2.2 Transaction Models
    • 5.3 The DOM Transaction Model
      • 5.3.1 Example of a DOM Transaction
      • 5.3.2 Multitransactions
      • 5.3.3 Nested Transactions
      • 5.3.4 Compensating Transactions
      • 5.3.5 Contingency Transactions
      • 5.3.6 Vital and Non-vital Transactions
    • 5.4 Formal Specification of the Model
      • 5.4.1 Summary of the ACTA Formalism
      • 5.4.2 Multitransactions
      • 5.4.3 Nested Transactions
      • 5.4.4 Contingency Transactions
      • 5.4.5 Compensating Transactions
    • 5.5 Conclusions and Future Work
  • 6 A Transaction Model for an Open Publication Environment
  • Peter Muth, Thomas C. Rakow, Wolfgang Klas, and Erich J. Newhold
    • 6.1 Overview
    • 6.2 Introduction
    • 6.3 The Architecture of the Publication Environment and its Transaction Needs
      • 6.3.1 Architecture
      • 6.3.2 Requirements for the Transaction Model
    • 6.4 Transaction Model
      • 6.4.1 Object-Oriented Serializability
      • 6.4.2 Object-Oriented Concurrency Control
      • 6.4.3 Recovery
    • 6.5 Transactions in the Publication Environment
      • 6.5.1 Transaction Execution
      • 6.5.2 The Impact of Distribution
      • 6.5.3 The Impact of Heterogeneity
    • 6.6 Conclusion
  • 7 The ConTract Model
  • Helmut Wächter and Andreas Reuter
    • 7.1 Introduction and Overview
    • 7.2 Transaction Support for Large Distributed Applications
    • 7.3 ConTracts
      • 7.3.1 Modelling Control Flow: Scripts and Steps
      • 7.3.2 ConTract Programming Model
      • 7.3.3 Transaction Model
      • 7.3.4 User Interface for Controlling Large Distributed Applications
      • 7.3.5 Forward Recovery and Context Management
      • 7.3.6 Consistency Control and Resource Conflict Resolution
      • 7.3.7 Compensation
      • 7.3.8 Synchronization with Invariants
    • 7.4 Implementation Issues
      • 7.4.1 Flow Management
      • 7.4.2 Transaction Management
      • 7.4.3 Logging
      • 7.4.4 Synchronization
      • 7.4.5 Transactional Communication Service
    • 7.5 Comparison with Other Work
      • 7.5.1 Structural Extensions
      • 7.5.2 Embedding Transactions in an Execution Environment
    • 7.6 Conclusions
    • 7.7 Sample Script
  • 8 Dynamic Restructuring of Transactions
  • Gail E. Kaiser and Calton Pu
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Requirements
    • 8.3 Programmed Transactions
      • 8.3.1 Definitions
      • 8.3.2 Nested Transactions
    • 8.4 User-Controlled Transactions
    • 8.5 Applications
      • 8.5.1 Editing
      • 8.5.2 Design Environments
      • 8.5.3 Multi-User Design Environments
    • 8.6 Implementation Issues
    • 8.7 Comparison to Related Work
    • 8.8 Conclusions
  • 9 Multidatabase Transaction and Query Processing in Logic
  • Eva Kühn, Franz Puntigam, and Ahmed K. Elmargarmid
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Representation of MDBS Queries in Prolog
      • 9.2.1 Dynamic and Static Integration
    • 9.3 Transaction Control with Logic Programming
      • 9.3.1 The Flex Transaction Model
      • 9.3.2 Parallel Logic Programming
    • 9.4 Query and Transaction Processing in VPL
      • 9.4.1 Architecture
      • 9.4.2 Operational Semantics of the VPL Language
      • 9.4.3 Mapping Transactions into VPL Queries
    • 9.5 Extending the Power of Flex Transactions
    • 9.6 Conclusions
  • 10 ACTA: The Saga Continues
  • Panos K. Chrysanthis and Krithi Ramamritham
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 The Formal ACTA Framework
      • 10.2.1 Preliminaries
      • 10.2.2 Effects of Transactions on Other Transactions
      • 10.2.3 Objects and the Effects of Transactions on Objects
    • 10.3 Characterization of Atomic Transactions
    • 10.4 Characterization of Sagas
      • 10.4.1 A Special Case of Sagas
    • 10.5 Variations of the Sagas Model
      • 10.5.1 Sagas with no Special Relation with Last Component
      • 10.5.2 Sagas with Vital Components
      • 10.5.3 Sagas of Sagas
      • 10.5.4 Sagas with Non-Compensatable Components
    • 10.6 Conclusions
  • 11 A Transaction Manager Development Facility for Non Standard Database Systems
  • Rainer Unland and Gunter Schlangeter
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Transaction types
      • 11.2.1 Conventional transaction management
      • 11.2.2 The concept of nested transactions
      • 11.2.3 Fundamental rules of Moss' approach
    • 11.3 Basic concepts and fundamental rules of the tool kit approach
      • 11.3.1 Basic Concepts of the Tool Kit Approach
      • 11.3.2 Fundamental rules of the tool kit approach
    • 11.4 Characteristics of transaction types
      • 11.4.1 Concurrency control scheme
      • 11.4.2 Object visibility (access view and release view)
      • 11.4.3 Task
      • 11.4.4 Concurrent execution of children
      • 11.4.5 Explicit cooperation (collaboration)
      • 11.4.6 Recovery
      • 11.4.7 Example
    • 11.5 Lock modes
      • 11.5.1 Motivation of our approach
      • 11.5.2 Basic lock modes of the tool kit approach
      • 11.5.3 The two effects of a lock
      • 11.5.4 Locks in the context of nested transactions
      • 11.5.5 Object related locks
      • 11.5.6 Subject related lock
    • 11.6 General rules of the tool kit approach
    • 11.7 Brief overview of the structure of the tool kit
    • 11.8 Concluding remarks
  • 12 The S-Transaction Model
  • Jar Veijalainen, Frank Eliassen, and Bernhard Holtkamp
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2. Autonomous environments and their requirements
      • 12.2.1 Basic definitions of autonomy
      • 12.2.2 O-autonomy
      • 12.2.3 D-and M-autonomy and heterogeneity
      • 12.2.4 C-autonomy
      • 12.2.5 E-autonomy and erroneous and correct behavior
    • 12.3 A gross architecture supporting S-transactions
      • 12.3.1 Requirements for a transaction model coping with autonomy
      • 12.3.2 The site architecture
      • 12.3.3 The overall distributed architecture
    • 12.4 Properties of S-transactions
      • 12.4.1 A semi-formal model for the S-transactions
      • 12.4.2 Syntactical correctness of S-transactions
      • 12.4.3 Atomicity of S-transactions
      • 12.4.4 Consistency preservation of S-transactions
      • 12.4.5 Compensatability of local sub-S-transactions
    • 12.5 A language supporting S-transactions, STDL
      • 12.5.1 STDL/DDL
      • 12.5.2 STDL/DML
      • 12.5.3 Compensation
    • 12.6 Applications of the S-transaction model
      • 12.6.1 Banking
      • 12.6.2 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
      • 12.6.3 Software Engineering
    • 12.7 Further developments
      • 12.7.1 FRIL
      • 12.7.2 The computational model of FRIL
    • 12.8 Conclusion
  • 13 Concepts and Applications of Multilevel Transactions and Open Nested Transactions
  • Gerhard Weikum and Hans-J. Schek
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 The Multilevel Transaction Model
      • 13.2.1 Concepts of Multilevel Transactions
      • 13.2.2 Limits of Multilevel Transactions
      • 13.2.3. A Summary of the Multilevel Transaction Theory
      • 13.2.4 Implementation Issues
    • 13.3 The General Case of Open Nested Transactions
    • 13.4 Relaxing the ACID Paradigm
      • 13.4.1 Consistency-preservation
      • 13.4.2 Isolation
      • 13.4.3 Atomicity
      • 13.4.4 Persistence
    • 13.5 Applications of Open Nested Transactions
      • 13.5.1 Extensible Database Systems
      • 13.5.2 Federated Database Systems
      • 13.5.3 Exploiting Operating-System Transactions
      • 13.5.4 Object-oriented Database Systems
      • 13.5.5 Intra-transaction Parallelism
    • 13.6 An Application Study: Office Document Filing and Retrieval
    • 13.7 Conclusion
  • 14 Using Polytransactions to Manage Interdependent Data
  • Amit P. Sheth, Marek Rusinkiewicz, and George Karabatis
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Specification of Interdatabase Dependencies
    • 14.3 Polytransactions for Managing Interdependent Data
      • 14.3.1 System Architecture
      • 14.3.2 The Concept and Properties of Polytransactions
      • 14.3.3 Executing Polytransactions
    • 14.4 Interdatabase Dependency Schema
      • 14.4.1 Specification of the Dependency Predicate
      • 14.4.2 Specification of Mutual Consistency Requirements
      • 14.4.3 Specification of consistency restoration procedures
      • 14.4.4 Correctness of Dependency Specifications
    • 14.5 Consistency of Interdependent Data
      • 14.5.1 Definition of Consistency of Interdependent Data
    • 14.6 Summary
  • Biography
  • Subject Index
  • Author Index

Details

No. of pages:
611
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Morgan Kaufmann 1992
Published:
Imprint:
Morgan Kaufmann
eBook ISBN:
9780080503776
Hardcover ISBN:
9781558602144

About the Editors

Ahmed Elmagarmid Editor

Ahmed Elmagarmid is Professor of Computer Sciences at Purdue University. He is the editor-in-chief of Distributed and Parallel Databases: An International Journal, editor of Information Sciences, and editor of the Advances in Database Systems series. Elmagarmid's research interests focus on consistency aspects of distributed databases; heterogeneous, federated, and multidatabases; and transaction management for advanced database applications, distance learning, and video databases. He has active projects in mobile databases, video databases, and datawebs and is a founding member of the Purdue Online effort.