Dairy Foods

Dairy Foods

Processing, Quality, and Analytical Techniques

1st Edition - September 22, 2021

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  • Editors: Adriano Cruz, Chaminda Ranadheera, Filomena Nazzaro, Amir Mortazavian
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128204788
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128204795

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Description

Dairy Foods: Processing, Quality, and Analytical Techniques provides comprehensive knowledge on the different factors involved in the development and safety precautions behind dairy foods, including special references to both theoretical and practical aspects. The book presents relevant information about the quality of dairy foods, including raw milk quality, predictive microbiology and risk analysis, food defense and food fraud. In addition, it looks into environmental aspects and consumer perception and goes on to cover methods and practices to process dairy products and analytical techniques behind dairy product development. Techniques explored include time domain magnetic resonance, thermal analysis and chemometric methods. This will be a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners in the dairy industry, as well as students in dairy science courses.

Key Features

  • Offers a comprehensive accounting on the latest analytical methods used in the dairy industry
  • Focuses on the processing of dairy foods, including emerging and novel dairy products with low sodium and sugar contents
  • Sourced from a team of editors with relevant expertise in dairy food processing

Readership

Researchers in dairy science and dairy technology. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students in dairy-related food science

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Chapter 1. Relevant factors for raw milk quality for dairy foods manufacture
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Aspects related to the milk composition
  • 1.2 Milk production
  • 1.3 Milk microbiota
  • 1.4 Mycotoxins
  • 1.5 Mastitis
  • 1.6 Frauds
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Raw milk: benefits and hazards
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Why do some consumers drink raw milk?
  • 2.3 Pasteurization of milk
  • 2.4 Nutritive factors in milk that are sensitive to heat treatment
  • 2.5 Major antimicrobial and antiviral proteins in cows’ milk
  • 2.6 Raw milk as a source of bacteria beneficial to human health
  • 2.7 Effect of pasteurization on the antimicrobial factors in bovine milk
  • 2.8 Effect of pasteurization on lactose and hypolactasia
  • 2.9 Does raw milk consumption reduce the risk of developing asthma and other allergy-related diseases?
  • 2.10 Protective effects of raw milk against diabetes, osteoporosis, and arthritis
  • 2.11 Does raw milk taste better than pasteurized milk?
  • 2.12 Raw milk as a source of potential human pathogens
  • 2.13 Detection of pathogens in raw milk
  • 2.14 The problems in using microbiological end-point testing to ensure food safety
  • 2.15 Sources of microbiological contamination in milk
  • 2.16 European Union and other legislation for ensuring the safety of RDM
  • 2.17 Specifications of raw milk for direct consumption
  • 2.18 Quantification of the risk from food poisoning from drinking raw milk versus pasteurized milk
  • 2.19 Production of safer raw drinking milk
  • 2.20 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Predictive microbiology and risk analysis
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Risk analyses in dairy processing
  • 3.3 Predictive microbiology
  • 3.4 Validation of predictive models
  • 3.5 Application of predictive microbiology model in dairy processing—case study
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Thermobacteriology: principles and application for dairy foods
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Microbial kinetic inactivation in the thermal processing of dairy products
  • 4.3 Safe from a public health standpoint
  • 4.4 The determination of thermal process
  • 4.5 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Nonbovine milk products
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Overview on recent nonbovine milk market scenario
  • 5.2 Protein composition: differences among nonbovine species
  • 5.3 Fat composition: differences among nonbovine species
  • 5.4 Sheep milk products
  • 5.5 Goat milk products
  • 5.6 Camel and equid milk products
  • 5.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Whey beverages
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Whey-fruit juice or pulp-based beverages
  • 6.3 Functional whey–based beverages
  • 6.4 Whey-based probiotic beverages
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Microencapsulation techniques to aggregate values in dairy foods formulation
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Dairy market
  • 7.3 Microencapsulation
  • 7.4 Incorporation of microencapsulated bioactive compounds in dairy products
  • 7.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8. High protein dairy foods: technological considerations
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Market for high-protein dairy powders
  • 8.3 High-protein dairy powders
  • 8.4 Predominant milk protein—casein
  • 8.5 Casein-based powders
  • 8.6 Coprecipitates
  • 8.7 Comparison of properties of coprecipitate vis-à-vis caseinate
  • 8.8 Milk protein concentrate
  • 8.9 Technology of producing milk protein concentrate
  • 8.10 Solubility of milk protein concentrate powder and means to improve it
  • 8.11 Micellar casein concentrate
  • 8.12 Modified method to produce “lactose-free” micellar casein powder
  • 8.13 Storage changes in micellar casein powder
  • 8.14 Micellar casein isolate
  • 8.15 Means to improve the solubility of micellar casein concentrate powder
  • 8.16 Specialized casein-enriched dairy powder suited for cheese making
  • 8.17 Whey-derived high-protein powders
  • 8.18 Whey proteins
  • 8.19 Production of whey protein concentrates and whey protein isolates
  • 8.20 Storage changes in whey protein powders
  • 8.21 Functional properties of dairy protein powders
  • 8.22 Sensory quality of protein powders
  • 8.23 Miscellaneous high-protein dairy powder—colostrum powder
  • 8.24 Applications of high-protein dairy powders
  • 8.25 Conclusion
  • References
  • Website reference
  • Chapter 9. Dairy foods reformulation by lower salt, sugar, and fat content
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Salt reduction
  • 9.3 Sugar reduction
  • 9.4 Fat reduction
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Low-field time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance applied to dairy foods
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Analysis of milk and milk powder
  • 10.3 Analysis of cheese
  • 10.4 Analysis of yogurt and acidified milk products
  • 10.5 Analysis of ice cream
  • 10.6 Analysis of butter
  • 10.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Application of differential scanning calorimetry to dairy foods
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Differential scanning calorimetry analysis principles
  • 11.3 Differential scanning calorimetry analysis applied to dairy products
  • 11.4 Milk components in differential scanning calorimetry analysis
  • 11.5 Protein
  • 11.6 Lactose
  • 11.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Machine learning–based chemometric methods for quality and authentication of milk and dairy products
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Milk quality and frauds
  • 12.3 Multivariate analytical solutions
  • 12.4 State of the art and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Novel quality assurance systems against intentional contamination in dairy factories
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Intentional food contamination—the essence, types, and definitions
  • 13.3 Traceability in the food chain
  • 13.4 Selected examples of intentional contamination in dairy industry
  • 13.5 Novel systems against intentional contamination
  • 13.6 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Environmental aspects in dairy processing
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Dairy industries and the environment
  • 14.2 Cleaner Production
  • 14.3 General description of the production process
  • 14.4 Environmental aspects and impacts
  • 14.5 Cleaner Production measures in the dairy industry
  • 14.6 Case study
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Role of dairy foods in sport nutrition
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Exercise
  • 15.2 Diet and exercise
  • 15.3 Dairy products and sport performance
  • 15.4 Dairy and exercise nutrient timing
  • 15.5 Dairy and resistance exercise
  • 15.6 Dairy and endurance exercise
  • 15.7 Dairy and team sports
  • 15.8 Dairy and exercise in children and adolescents
  • 15.9 Dairy and weight loss in athletes
  • 15.10 Dairy for supporting health
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 386
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Woodhead Publishing 2021
  • Published: September 22, 2021
  • Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128204788
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128204795

About the Editors

Adriano Cruz

Adriano Gomes da Cruz has a PhD in Food Technology from the Faculty of Food Engineering of the State University of Campinas Associate Professor of the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ) in the Department of Food. Adriano has teaching and professional experience in Food Science and Technology, with an emphasis on Dairy Science and Technology in particular non-thermal technologies, Quality Management in Food Industry Sensory and Consumer Science applied to dairy products.

Affiliations and Expertise

Federal Institute of Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Brazil

Chaminda Ranadheera

Senaka Ranadheera has a PhD in Food Science from the University of Newcastle, Australia. Senaka teaches a number of subjects and is also the coordinator for the postgraduate subject Food Safety and Quality, as well as the undergraduate subject Food Research & Development. In addition, he coordinates the Honours degree program. He was an Early Career Research Fellow at Victoria University before joining the University of Melbourne in 2017.

Affiliations and Expertise

The University of Melbourne, Australia

Filomena Nazzaro

Filomena Nazzaro is senior scientist at the Institute of Food Science, of CNR (CNR-ISA) in Avellino, Italy, where she is also head of the Laboratory of Food Safety and Biotechnology. Dr. Nazzaro’s research is divided among biochemical and biological characterization of vegetables, the study of probiotics and prebiotics, with the application of technologies, such as microencapsulation, to formulate new functional foods. In addition, she studies the antimicrobial activity and quorum quenching by polyphenols/dairy peptides.

Affiliations and Expertise

Senior Scientist, The Institute of Food Science of CNR (CNR-ISA), Avellino, Italy

Amir Mortazavian

Amir Mortazavian is a Full Professor at the Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences, Food Science and Technology/National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. He has experience with dairy science and technology (esp., fermented milks), Functional foods, Probiotics and prebiotics in food products, and Food chemistry (esp., food ingredient interactions).

Affiliations and Expertise

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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