Current Advances for Development of Functional Foods Modulating Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

Current Advances for Development of Functional Foods Modulating Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

1st Edition - December 3, 2021

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  • Editors: Blanca Hernandez-Ledesma, Cristina Martinez-Villaluenga
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128234822
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128225844

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Description

Current Advances for Development of Functional Foods Modulating Inflammation and Oxidative Stress presents the nutritional and technological aspects related to the development of functional foods with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Specifically, analytical approaches for the characterization of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of healthy foods and functional constituents, as well as technological strategies for the extraction of compounds and fractions from raw materials to produce anti-inflammatory and antioxidant ingredients are addressed. In addition, the molecular mechanisms by which foods and their components can modulate inflammation and their oxidative stress effects on disease prevention are explored. Finally, clinical research addressing nutritional needs in pathological subjects with inflammatory diseases are considered.

Key Features

  • Covers methods of analysis and extraction of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds
  • Offers an overview of the main anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds in foods
  • Provides a guide on the mechanisms of action and health benefits of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant dietary bioactives

Readership

Nutrition researchers, academics, and scientists working in the research and development sector of food industry as well as students studying related fields

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Bioactive compounds modulating inflammation and oxidative stress in some traditional functional foods and beverages
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 A brief overview of inflammation and oxidative stress
  • 1.2 Food compounds for the control of the oxidative stress and inflammation
  • 1.3 Traditional diet: effects on oxidative stress and inflammation
  • 1.4 Functional traditional foods effect on oxidative stress and inflammation with bioactive compounds
  • 1.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 2. Health-promoting activities and bioavailability of bioactive compounds from functional foods
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 The role in modulating inflammation and oxidative stress of food bioactive compounds
  • 2.3 Fermented foods for better bioavailability of some nutrients—fighting with inflammation and oxidative stress
  • 2.4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Development of functional foods by using 3D printing technologies: application to oxidative stress and inflammation-related affections
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 3D food printing technologies
  • 3.3 The role of diet and nutrients in oxidative stress and inflammatory processes
  • 3.4 Personalized functional foods through 3D printing
  • 3.5 Functional foods through 3D printing: opportunities, challenges, and perspectives
  • 3.6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 4. The regulatory aspects of substantiating health benefits of foods containing antioxidants
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 European food law
  • 4.3 Health claims on antioxidants
  • 4.4 Biomarkers for oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids
  • 4.5 Discussion and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Developing novel foods using multiple emulsions: insights with reference to bioaccessibility and bioavailability
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Types of multiple emulsions
  • 5.3 Methods of preparing multiple emulsions
  • 5.4 Physicochemical properties of multiple emulsions
  • 5.5 Applications of multiple emulsions in developing functional foods
  • 5.6 Stability of multiple emulsions
  • 5.7 Bioavailability and bioaccessibility of bioactives encapsulated with multiple emulsions
  • 5.8 Conclusion and future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 6. A new approach of functional pectin and pectic oligosaccharides: role as antioxidant and antiinflammatory compounds
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Pectins
  • 6.2 Pectic oligosaccharides
  • 6.3 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Fatty acids from natural resources in inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases with specific focus on inflammatory bowel disease
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Preface
  • 7.2 Gastrointestinal diseases and fat digestion—the background
  • 7.3 Overview of fatty acids nomenclature, classification, their occurrence, and role in IBD
  • 7.4 Tight junctions, FAs, and inflammation
  • 7.5 FFAs and FFAR cross-talk in IBD
  • 7.6 Summary of the role of FAs in inflammatory gastrointestinal disease
  • Acknowledgments
  • Author disclosures
  • Authors’ contributions
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Proteins, peptides, and protein hydrolysates as immunomodulatory and antioxidant agents for the formulation of functional foods
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Sources of food-derived bioactive hydrolysates and peptides
  • 8.3 Bioactive peptides as antioxidants
  • 8.4 Antiinflammatory properties of bioactive peptides
  • 8.5 Bioactive peptides as ingredients in functional foods
  • 8.6 Conclusion and future prospective studies
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant phenolic compounds
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Phenolic compounds: definition, classification, and sources
  • 9.3 Phenolic compounds as antioxidants
  • 9.4 Phenolic compounds as antiinflammatory agents
  • 9.5 Conclusion and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Role of micronutrients zinc and selenium in inflammation and oxidative stress
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Inflammation, oxidative stress, and chronic diseases
  • 10.2 Selenium
  • 10.3 Zinc
  • 10.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Glucosinolates and their bioactive metabolites as functional compounds modulating inflammation
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Molecular mechanisms of glucosinolates and their bioactive form in inflammatory pathways
  • 11.3 Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Microalgal bioactive components as antiinflammatory and antioxidant agents for health promotion
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Potential scope of microalgae and biotechnological implications
  • 12.2 Biotechnology of microalgae in the food industry
  • 12.3 Biological compounds from microalgae with properties of interest in inflammatory processes
  • 12.4 Main pathological mechanisms of inflammation, including mediators and molecular pathways involved
  • 12.5 Microalgae-derived products
  • 12.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Polysaccharides from macroalgae: chemical characterization, functional properties and biological activity
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Compounds extracted from macroalgae with biological action
  • 13.2 Sulfated polysaccharides: structure and chemical characterization
  • 13.3 Functional properties and industrial applications of sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed
  • 13.4 Proven biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides
  • 13.5 Perspectives for the use of sulfated polysaccharides
  • 13.6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Role of cereal bioactive compounds in the prevention of age-related diseases
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Molecular antiaging mechanisms of bioactive compounds in cereals
  • 14.3 Health effects of wholegrain cereals
  • 14.4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Potential role of pulses in the development of functional foods modulating inflammation and oxidative stress
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Pulses bioactive compounds, inflammation and oxidative stress
  • 15.3 Challenges and opportunities of pulses in the development of functional foods
  • 15.4 Concluding remarks
  • Conflicts of interest
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Probiotics and postbiotics: focus on metabolic syndrome
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Probiotics as nutritional approaches for the prevention or treatment of metabolic syndrome
  • 16.3 Conclusion and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Potential of edible insects as a new source of bioactive compounds against metabolic syndrome
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Composition of edible insects in relation to their health properties and metabolic syndrome
  • 17.3 Tenebrio molitor
  • 17.4 Hermetia illucens
  • 17.5 Musca domestica
  • 17.6 Acheta domesticus
  • 17.7 Gryllodes sigillatus
  • 17.8 Alphitobius diaperinus
  • 17.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Advances in production and properties validation of multifunctional ingredients from Argentine food fruits to modulate oxidative stress and inflammation
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Argentine food fruits and their antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties
  • 18.3 Use of Northwestern Argentine fruits in oxidative stress and inflammatory processes related to metabolic syndrome
  • 18.4 Development of multifunctional ingredients from Argentine food fruits
  • 18.5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Bioactive compounds from Moringa oleifera as promising protectors of in vivo inflammation and oxidative stress processes
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 In vivo antioxidative effect of Moringa oleifera
  • 19.3 In vivo antiinflammatory activity of Moringa oleifera
  • 19.4 Conclusion and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Cruciferous vegetables: a mine of phytonutrients for functional and nutraceutical enrichment
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Cruciferous vegetables and their significance
  • 20.3 Crucifer phytochemicals and their activity
  • 20.4 Nutraceutical significance of the crucifers
  • 20.5 Crucifers their processing and antioxidant potential
  • 20.6 Recent trends for nutritional improvement of the crucifers
  • 20.7 Conclusion and future prospects
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Challenges in the extraction of antiinflammatory and antioxidant compounds from new plant sources
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Conventional solvent extraction
  • 21.3 Emerging technologies for the extraction of bioactives
  • 21.4 Comparative performance
  • 21.5 Combinations
  • 21.6 Challenges and future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 22. Encapsulation technologies applied to bioactive phenolic compounds and probiotics with potential application on chronic inflammation
  • Abstract
  • 22.1 Methods
  • 22.2 Importance of phenolic encapsulation: stability, digestion, and absorption
  • 22.3 Encapsulation process applied to improve the phenolic bioaccesibility/bioavailability
  • 22.4 Probiotic encapsulation techniques to improve the cell viability
  • 22.5 Gut microbiota and polyphenols diet interactions: synergistic effects against inflammation
  • 22.6 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23. Fermentation and germination as a way to improve cereals antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties
  • Abstract
  • 23.1 Background
  • 23.2 Fermentation technology for enhancing the nutritional and functional properties of postprocessed cereal grains
  • 23.3 Germination technology for enhancing the nutritional and functional properties of postprocessed cereal grains
  • 23.4 Possible harms and hurdles
  • 23.5 Conclusions and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 24. Modulation of inflammation and oxidative stress in Helicobacter pylori infection by bioactive compounds from food components
  • Abstract
  • 24.1 Brief overview of Helicobacter pylori as human pathogen
  • 24.2 Inflammatory response and oxidative stress associated to H. pylori infection
  • 24.3 Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and their relationship with gastric inflammation and oxidative damage
  • 24.4 Bioactive compounds from food components as tools against inflammatory and oxidative damage associated to H. pylori infection
  • 24.5 Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 25. Current evidence on the modulatory effects of food proteins and peptides in inflammation and gut microbiota
  • Abstract
  • 25.1 Introduction: inflammation and oxidative stress
  • 25.2 Impact of “gut health” on “general human health”
  • 25.3 Inflammatory bowel diseases: the role of foods and their bioactive compounds
  • 25.4 Role of food proteins and peptides against inflammatory bowel disease
  • 25.5 Effects of food peptides on gut microbiota
  • 25.6 Future prospects
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 26. Immunonutritional agonists in the neuroimmune response in AGE-Ing
  • Abstract
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Neuroinflammation: pathways and biomarkers
  • 26.3 Metabolic-induced neuroinflammation: from periphery to central nervous system
  • 26.4 Immunonutritional communication within the gut–brain axis
  • 26.5 Concluding remarks and future perspectives
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 27. Role of dietary spices in modulating inflammation and oxidative stress
  • Abstract
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Methods
  • 27.3 Results
  • 27.4 Discussion
  • 27.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 28. Functional foods, hormesis, and oxidative stress
  • Abstract
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 What is hormesis?
  • 28.3 Stressor-mediated pathways and disease
  • 28.4 Antioxidants and related food sources (prooxidants or antioxidants)
  • 28.5 Conclusion and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 29. Cancer on fire: role of inflammation in prevention and treatment
  • Abstract
  • 29.1 Introduction
  • 29.2 Inflammatory players and their roles in tumorigenesis
  • 29.3 Prevention and treatment of cancers by targeting inflammatory pathways
  • 29.4 Conclusion and future perspective
  • Acknowledgement
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 30. The effects of soya consumption on glycemic parameters of type 2 diabetes: potential for functional foods
  • Abstract
  • 30.1 Introduction
  • 30.2 Soya intake and type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • 30.3 Mechanistic effects and potential for formulation of functional foods
  • 30.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 674
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: December 3, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128234822
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128225844

About the Editors

Blanca Hernandez-Ledesma

Blanca Hernández-Ledesma earned her Pharmacy Bachelor Degree in 1998, and defended the PhD thesis in Pharmacy in 2002. Her research career is focused on the biological activity of food proteins/peptides aiming at a better understanding of their health implications and the development of novel food ingredients. She is author of 73 JCR articles, 9 popular science articles, and 30 book chapters. Her results have been presented in 75 international and national conferences. She has supervised 4 Doctoral Thesis and 14 Master Thesis. She has participated in more than 30 international and national Research Projects. She has participated as member of Selection Board for Tenured Scientists, PhD and Master Thesis Dissertation committees, reviewer in international PhD theses, and member of National and International Projects Evaluation Panels. She is member of the Editorial Committees of 2 books and 8 journals and collaborates as reviewer for more than 90 journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Tenured Scientist, Instituto de Investigacion en Ciencias de la Alimentacion, Spain

Cristina Martinez-Villaluenga

Dr. Cristina Martínez-Villaluenga is a Research Scientist at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) since 2010 with particular expertise in the development of biotechnological innovations to maximize the health benefits of underexploited plant-derived foods for their application as nutraceuticals and functional ingredients. In addition, the elucidation of the mechanism of action of food compounds in disease prevention and management is other of her research goals. She has B.S. Degrees in Biology and Food Science and Technology from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). After receiving her Ph.D. from the Automoma University of Madrid in 2006, she was a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign between 2007 and 2009. Her current research is focused on the sustainable and cost effective production of novel bioactive peptides for prevention and management of hypertension, inflammatory diseases, obesity and metabolic disorders. Dr. Martinez-Villaluenga has participated in several national, European and industrial research projects with large private companies. Dr. Martinez-Villaluenga holds 2 patents and has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles and books on the areas of Food Science, Technology and Molecular Nutrition. She has actively involved in mentoring of undergraduate, MSc, and PhD students and teaching in postgraduate programmes from Autonoma University of Madrid.

Affiliations and Expertise

Research Scientist, Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, Spain

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