Cord Blood Stem Cells Medicine - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780124077850, 9780124078369

Cord Blood Stem Cells Medicine

1st Edition

Editors: Catherine Stavropoulos-Giokas Dominique Charron Cristina Navarrete
eBook ISBN: 9780124078369
Hardcover ISBN: 9780124077850
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 10th December 2014
Page Count: 398
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
118.00
82.60
82.60
82.60
82.60
82.60
94.40
94.40
95.00
66.50
66.50
66.50
66.50
66.50
76.00
76.00
150.00
105.00
105.00
105.00
105.00
105.00
120.00
120.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Cord Blood Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine discusses the current applications for cord blood stem cells and techniques for banking cord blood. Cord blood, blood from the umbilical cord and placenta of an infant, represents an alternate source of stem cells that can be used to treat a myriad of disorders. Cord blood stem cells are being used more frequently and studied more seriously, as evidenced by the explosion of scientific literature on the topic.

Currently, clinical and pre-clinical trials are being done in the field, treating conditions as severe as heart failure. Coupled with regenerative medicine, cord blood stem cells potentially carry the future of research and medicine in treating tissue damage, genetic disorders, and degenerative diseases. Read about new applications for cord blood stem cells and new techniques for banking cord blood — the future of regenerative medicine therapy.

Key Features

  • Comprehensive coverage of the medical application of cord blood stem cells
  • Practical guide for usage of allogeneic and autologous cord blood in regenerative medicine
  • Covers new applications of cord blood stem cells, particularly transplantation and HIV
  • Introduces new technologies for cord blood stem cells and regenerative medicine

Readership

Researchers, scientists, post-grad students, and practitioners in Immunology, Hematology, Transfusion Medicine, Regenerative Medicine, and Stem Cell Biology

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Foreword
  • Section I. Introduction
    • Chapter 1. Introduction to Cord Blood Stem Cells
  • Section II. Cord Blood Cells Biology
    • Chapter 2. Cord Blood Content
      • 1. Biological Background of Cord Blood Cells—Development of Hematopoietic and Nonhematopoietic Cells
      • 2. Endothelial Cells in CB
      • 3. Stromal Cells in CB and Cord Tissue as Compared to BM
      • 4. Isolation, Expansion, and Characterization of CB-derived Adherent Cells from CB
      • 5. Generation of Cell Clones and Clonal Populations
      • 6. USSC and CB MSC
      • 7. Generation of Adherent Cells from the Wharton’s Jelly (Cord)
      • 8. Gene Expression Profiles
      • 9. Correlation of HOX-gene Expression and Regenerative Potential
      • 10. Bone and Cartilage Forming Potential of Cord Blood Stromal Cells
      • 11. Why Do We Have These Progenitors or Elusive Cells in CB?
      • 12. USSC and MSC from CB Support Hematopoietic Cells
      • 13. Liver Regeneration and Potential of CB-derived Stem Cells to Undergo Hepatic Differentiation
      • 14. Cardial Regeneration In vivo
      • 15. In vitro Differentiation Potential toward Cardiomyocytes
      • 16. CB Subpopulations for Neuronal Regeneration
      • 17. Reprogrammed Subpopulations from CB
      • 18. Conclusion
      • List of Acronyms and Abbreviations
    • Chapter 3. Cord Blood Hematopoiesis: The Road to Transplantation
      • 1. Use of Placental Cord Blood as a Source for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Transplantation: A Historical Perspective
      • 2. Characterization of PCB HSPCs
      • 3. Strategies to Overcome Current Limitations in PCB Transplantation
      • 4. Increasing the HSPCs of the Graft
      • 5. Improving the Lodging Capacity of the PCB Graft
      • 6. Improving the Stem Cell Receptivity or Immunological Status of the Host
      • 7. Additional Clinical Uses of Cord Blood under Investigation
      • 8. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 4. Immunobiology of Cord Blood Cells
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Immune Properties of Cord Blood Cells
      • 3. Immune Reconstitution after CBT
      • 4. Generation of Immune Competent Cells from Cord Blood
      • 5. Conclusion
      • List of Abbreviations
    • Chapter 5. Cord and Cord Blood-derived Endothelial Cells
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. The Human Endothelial Colony-Forming Cell Hierarchy
      • 3. Differences Between Human Umbilical Cord Blood ECFCs and Those Sourced from Adult Peripheral Blood, Umbilical Cord, and Placenta
      • 4. Obstetric Factors and ECFC Content in Umbilical Cord Blood at Term
      • 5. ECFC Content and Function in Umbilical Cord Blood Based on Gestational Age
      • 6. The Diabetic Environment Affects Umbilical Cord Blood ECFCs
      • 7. Processing and Cryopreservation Affect ECFC Numbers in Umbilical Cord Blood
      • 8. The Phenotypic Identity of ECFCs
      • 9. The Use of Umbilical Cord Blood or Placental ECFCs as a Cellular Product in Regenerative Medicine
      • 10. Conclusions
      • Glossary
      • List of Acronyms and Abbreviations
    • Chapter 6. HLA and Immunogenetics in Cord Blood Transplantation
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Structure, Function, and Polymorphism of HLA
      • 3. HLA Typing Techniques
      • 4. CBT Results
      • 5. Other HLA Criteria for CBU Selection
      • 6. Conclusion
      • List of Abbreviations
  • Section III. Cord Blood Cells for Clinical Use
    • Chapter 7. Clinical Use of Umbilical Cord Blood Cells
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Clinical CB Transplantation
      • 3. Clinical Use of Related CB Cells for Allogeneic Transplantation
      • 4. Clinical Use of Unrelated CB Cells for Allogeneic Transplantation
      • 5. Selection of CB Units for Transplantation
      • 6. New Strategies to Improve Outcomes after CB Transplantation
      • 7. Conclusion
      • List of Acronyms and Abbreviations
    • Chapter 8. Immunodeficiencies and Metabolic Diseases
      • 1. Immunodeficiencies
      • 2. Metabolic Diseases
    • Chapter 9. Cord Blood Cells and Autoimmune Diseases
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of ADs
      • 3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of AD
      • 4. Use of UCB-derived Cells and Cord Blood MSCs for Treating AD
      • 5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 10. Umbilical Cord as a Source of Immunomodulatory Reagents
      • 1. Regulatory T-cells
      • 2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
      • 3. Conclusions
    • Chapter 11. Cord Blood Cells for Clinical Use: Expansion and Manipulation
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. CB Transplantation in Pediatric Patients
      • 3. CB Transplantation in Adult Patients
      • 4. Double CB Transplantation
      • 5. CB Transplantation after Reduced Intensity Regimens
      • 6. CB Graft Manipulation
      • 7. CB Stem Cell and Progenitor Cell Expansion to Enhance Engraftment
      • 8. Improving CB Homing to BM
      • 9. Prostaglandin and Homing
      • 10. CB Immune Cells to Improve Outcome
      • 11. Expanding Multivirus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes from CB
      • 12. CB-Derived Natural Killer (NK) Cells
      • 13. CB-Derived Regulatory T Cells
      • 14. Redirecting Specificity of CB-Derived T Cells to Leukemia Antigens
      • 15. Conclusion
    • Chapter 12. Cord Blood Stem Cells for Clinical Use: Diabetes and Cord Blood
      • 1. Diabetes and Global Challenges
      • 2. Stem Cells in Cord Blood
      • 3. Application of Stem Cell Educator Therapy in T1D
      • 4. Application of Stem Cell Educator Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes
      • 5. Conclusions
      • Dr Yong Zhao’s Bibliography
  • Section IV. Regenerative Medicine Applications
    • Chapter 13. Emerging Uses of Cord Blood in Regenerative Medicine–Neurological Applications
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Umbilical CB as a Source of Stem Cells for Neurological Applications
      • 3. Potential Mechanisms of CB as Therapy for Patients with Neurological Diseases
      • 4. Unrelated Donor CB Transplantation for Genetic Brain Diseases in Children
      • 5. Ischemic Injuries
      • 6. Neurodegenerative Diseases
      • 7. Autism
      • 8. Challenges
      • 9. Summary
    • Chapter 14. Biobanks for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Reprogrammed Tissues
      • 1. Introduction: A Brief History of Induced Pluripotency
      • 2. What Defines Pluripotency and the Pluripotent Stem Cell
      • 3. Reprogramming Human Somatic Cells Toward Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Defined Factors
      • 4. Tissue Differentiation from hiPSCs
      • 5. Potential Applications for hiPSCs in Future Regenerative Medicines
      • 6. Considerations Toward Development of hiPSC-derived Therapies
      • 7. Final Considerations
  • Section V. Cord Blood Banking: A Current State of Affairs
    • Chapter 15. Cord Blood Banking: Operational and Regulatory Aspects
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Conclusions
    • Chapter 16. Cord Blood Unit Selection for Unrelated Transplantation
      • 1. Overview: Search and Cord Blood Unit Selection
      • 2. Quality/Potency of the CBU
      • 3. Selection of CB Units for Transplant: Interaction of TNC and HLA
      • 4. Selection of CBU with “Permissible” HLA Mismatches
      • 5. Approaches to Overcome the TNC Limitations of Single CB Grafts
      • 6. Quality of CBU—Banking Practices
      • 7. Patient Diagnosis, Relapse Risk, and CBU Selection
      • 8. Other Immunological Considerations for CBU Selection
      • 9. Other Graft Characteristics Affecting CBU Quality and Safety
      • 10. “Back-up” CB Grafts
      • 11. Conclusions—Selection Guidelines
    • Chapter 17. Quality Management Systems Including Accreditation Standards
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Quality Management
      • 3. QM Systems
      • 4. Creating a Documented Quality Management System (Program): Quality Management Plan
      • 5. Standardized Systems
      • 6. Accreditation
      • 7. Conclusion
      • Abbreviations
    • Chapter 18. Regulation Across the Globe
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Regulation in the EU
      • 3. Cord blood banking in the USA
      • 4. Cord blood banking in Asia, Africa, and Oceania
      • 5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 19. International Development and Import/Export–WMDA
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Issues to Consider when Starting a Cord Blood Bank
      • 3. Listing of Cord Blood Units—Making them Available to Transplant Units
      • 4. Registry—Gateway to the World
      • 5. Search for Cord Blood
      • 6. Challenges Related to the Provision of Cord Blood—Selection
      • 7. Challenges Related to the Provision of Cord Blood—Service Provider
      • 8. Challenges Related to the Provision of Cord Blood—Regulation
      • 9. Cord Blood Banks Worldwide
      • 10. Analyzing the Field—Number of Cord Blood Shipments
      • 11. Future Plans for Cord Blood Banks
      • 12. List of Cord Blood Registries/Banks
  • Section VI. Cord Blood Banking: Current and Future Outlooks
    • Chapter 20. Allogeneic and Autologous Cord Blood Banks
      • 1. A “Perfect” Match?
      • 2. Stem Cell Trans-differentiation and Tissue Repair?
      • 3. Source and Quality of Information
      • 4. Maternal and Paternal Knowledge and Preferences
      • 5. Conclusions: What is the Current “Child’s Best Interest”?
      • Conflict of Interest
    • Chapter 21. The Future of Cord Blood Banks
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. CB and Fetal Annex Tissues are an Abundant Source of “Young” Stem Cells
      • 3. CB-derived EPCs
      • 4. UC Wharton’s Jelly MSCs
      • 5. The iPSCs
      • 6. CB and UC Components
      • 7. Conclusion
      • List of Abbreviations
  • Section VII. The Viewpoint of Society
    • Chapter 22. An Introductory Note to the Cord Blood Banking Issues in a European and International Environment
    • Chapter 23. Ethical and Legal Issues in Cord Blood Stem Cells and Biobanking
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Scientific Background: Stem Cells from Cord Blood, the Umbilical Cord, and the Placenta
      • 3. Fundamental Ethical and Legal Issues
      • 4. The Status of the Umbilical Cord and the Placenta
      • 5. Legislative Characterizations of Stem Cells from Cord Blood, the Umbilical Cord, and the Placenta
      • 6. Informed Consent
      • 7. Communication of Information to the Donor of Cord Blood, Umbilical Cord, and Placenta Regarding Likely Diseases
      • 8. The Donation of Cord Blood, Umbilical Cord, and Placenta and Noncommercialization
      • 9. Anonymity—Anonymization of Donation and Protection of Data
      • 10. “Biological Safety” of the Donor and Biobanking
      • 11. Regenerative Medicine and Mesenchymal Cells of the Umbilical Cord and the Placenta
      • 12. Conclusion
    • Chapter 24. Industrial Economics of Cord Blood Banks
      • 1. Types of Cord Blood Banks
      • 2. Emergence of Hybrid Models
      • 3. Economic Model of Public Banks
      • 4. Economic Model of Commercial Banks
      • 5. Attitudes and Knowledge of Pregnant Women
      • 6. Cost Analysis for Public Banks
      • 7. Cost Analysis for Private Banks
      • 8. The Emergence of Bioinsurance
      • 9. Cost-utility for Public Health
      • 10. Tissue Economies
      • 11. Rethinking the Business Model of Private Banks
    • Chapter 25. Public Health Policies in European Union: An Innovation Strategy–Horizon 2020
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. The Configuration Framework of Guiding Principles of Health Policies
      • 3. The Health Status of the Population in the EU
      • Appendix 1: Evolution Rate (%) of Life Expectancy for Both Sexes per Decade (1970–2010)
      • Appendix 2: Life Expectancy at Birth, Males–Females (1970–2010)
      • Appendix 3: Life Expectancy at the Age of 65 Years, Males–Females (1980–2010)
      • Appendix 4: Age-Standardized Mortality Rate (SDR-ICD-10-Diseases of All Causes, All Ages), per 100,000 Inhabitants
      • Appendix 5: Basic Causes of Mortality in the EU-28, EU-15, EU-13 (2010)
      • Appendix 6: Causes of Death—Standardized Death Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants in the EU-28, EU-15, EU-13 (1980–2010)
      • Appendix 7: Loss in Life Expectancy Years for Men and Women from Death before the Age of 65 Years (1980–2010)
      • Appendix 8: PYLLs from All Causes with Comparative Reference to Life Expectancy (100,000 Men–Women Aged 0–69), (1961, 2010)
      • Appendix 9: Health-adjusted Life Expectancy
      • 4. Redesigning Health Policies in Europe
      • Appendix 10: The Multidimensional Field of Population-appreciated Health Needs
      • Appendix 11: Main Objectives of Health Policies: Prolonging Life in Good Health and with Quality Years
      • 5. Health Policies on Cord Blood Stem Cells Banking
  • Appendix
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
398
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780124078369
Hardcover ISBN:
9780124077850

About the Editor

Catherine Stavropoulos-Giokas

Affiliations and Expertise

Hellenic Cord Blood Bank Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece

Dominique Charron

Affiliations and Expertise

Professeur, Chef de Service, Histocompatibilite - Immunogenetique, Hopital Sait-Louis, Paris, France

Cristina Navarrete

Affiliations and Expertise

Consultant Clinical Scientist H&I Services and Director of the British Bone Marrow Register (BBMR) and NHS-Cord Blood Bank, London, UK