Computer Animation - 2nd Edition

Computer Animation

2nd Edition

Algorithms and Techniques

Authors: Rick Parent Rick Parent
Imprint: Morgan Kaufmann
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Table of Contents

1. Introduction 1.1 Perception 1.2 The Heritage of Animation 1.2.1 Early Devices 1.2.2 The Early Days of “Conventional” Animation 1.2.3 Disney 1.2.4 Contributions of Others 1.2.5 Other Media for Animation 1.2.6 Principles of Animation 1.2.7 Principles of Filmmaking 1.3 Animation Production 1.3.1 Sound 1.4 Computer Animation Production 1.4.1 Computer Animation Production Tasks 1.4.2 Digital Editing 1.4.3 Digital Video 1.4.4 Digital Audio 1.5 A Brief History of Computer Animation 1.5.1 Early Activity (pre 1980) 1.5.2 The Middle Years (The ‘80s) 1.5.3 Animation Comes of Age (The mid-80’s and beyond) 1.6 Chapter Summary References 2. Technical Background 2.1 Spaces and Transformations 2.1.1 The Display Pipeline 2.1.2 Homogeneous Coordinates and the Transformation Matrix 2.1.3 Compound Transformation: Concatenating Transformation Matrices 2.1.4 Basic Transformations 2.1.5 Representing an Arbitrary Orientation 2.1.6 Extracting Transformations from a Matrix 2.1.7 Description of Transformations in the Display Pipeline 2.1.8 Error Considerations 2.2 Orientation Representation 2.2.1 Fixed Angle Representation 2.2.2 Euler Angle Representation 2.2.3 Angle and Axis Representation 2.2.4 Quaternion Representation 2.2.5 Exponential Map Representation 2.3 Chapter Summary References 3. Interpolation 3.1 Interpolating Values 3.

Description

Driven by the demands of research and the entertainment industry, the techniques of animation are pushed to render increasingly complex objects with ever-greater life-like appearance and motion. This rapid progression of knowledge and technique impacts professional developers, as well as students. Developers must maintain their understanding of conceptual foundations, while their animation tools become ever more complex and specialized. The second edition of Rick Parent's Computer Animation is an excellent resource for the designers who must meet this challenge. The first edition established its reputation as the best technically oriented animation text. This new edition focuses on the many recent developments in animation technology, including fluid animation, human figure animation, and soft body animation. The new edition revises and expands coverage of topics such as quaternions, natural phenomenon, facial animation, and inverse kinematics. The book includes up-to-date discussions of Maya scripting and the Maya C++ API, programming on real-time 3D graphics hardware, collision detection, motion capture, and motion capture data processing.

Key Features

  • New up-to-the-moment coverage of hot topics like real-time 3D graphics, collision detection, fluid and soft-body animation and more!
    Companion site with animation clips drawn from research & entertainment and code samples
    Describes the mathematical and algorithmic foundations of animation that provide the animator with a deep understanding and control of technique

Readership

Students studying computer animation in courses with an emphasis on understanding algorithms and programming. Technical directors, animators, artists, and game developers looking to understand the foundations of animation to improve studio work.


Details

Language:
English
Imprint:
Morgan Kaufmann
eBook ISBN:
9780080553856

Reviews

"An invaluable resource for anyone interested in computer animation programming or for anyone who simply wants to get under the hood of their favorite animation application." —Mike Caputo, President, Animation Bureau


About the Authors

Rick Parent Author

Rick Parent is an Associate Professor at Ohio State University, where he teaches computer graphics and computer animation. His research in computer animation focuses on its relation to modeling and animating the human figure, with special emphasis on geometric modeling and implicit surfaces. Rick earned a Ph.D. in computer science from Ohio State University and a Bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Dayton. In 1977, he was awarded "Outstanding Ph.D. Thesis Award" (one of four given nationally) by the NCC. He has served on numerous SIGGRAPH committees, in addition to the Computer Graphics International 2000 Program Committee and the Computer Animation '99 Program Committee and is on the editorial board of the Visual Computer Journal.

Affiliations and Expertise

is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Ohio State University, where he teaches computer graphics and computer animation. He has taught Computer Animation for over 25 years and has worked in the field for over 35. His research interests include the modeling and animating of the human figure.

Rick Parent Author

Rick Parent is an Associate Professor at Ohio State University, where he teaches computer graphics and computer animation. His research in computer animation focuses on its relation to modeling and animating the human figure, with special emphasis on geometric modeling and implicit surfaces. Rick earned a Ph.D. in computer science from Ohio State University and a Bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Dayton. In 1977, he was awarded "Outstanding Ph.D. Thesis Award" (one of four given nationally) by the NCC. He has served on numerous SIGGRAPH committees, in addition to the Computer Graphics International 2000 Program Committee and the Computer Animation '99 Program Committee and is on the editorial board of the Visual Computer Journal.

Affiliations and Expertise

is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Ohio State University, where he teaches computer graphics and computer animation. He has taught Computer Animation for over 25 years and has worked in the field for over 35. His research interests include the modeling and animating of the human figure.