Compendium of Chiral Auxiliary Applications, Three-Volume Set

1st Edition

Authors:

  • Gregory Roos
  • Gregory Roos
  • Description

    The Compendium is a detailed compilation of chiral auxiliaries which are used in the field of organic chemistry to direct "asymmetric synthesis". A molecule is called chiral because it can have two "enantiomers" -- like left and right-handed molecules. An enantiomer is either of two molecules of the same chemical composition that are mirror images of each other but not identical. A "chiral auxiliary" is an aid / auxiliary used to specifically produce either the left or right enantiomer of the chosen molecule, as desired. In this comprehesive reference source, industrial chemists can make informed selections of an auxiliary for a specific application. It is fully cross-referenced to enable the comparative selection of auxiliaries. The work includes over 13,000 auxiliary reaction applications with complete reaction details of the synthetic routes, reagents, and primary literature references.

    Key Features

    @introbul:Key Features @bul:* This remarkable major reference work is the first such compilation and represents the only total source for the diverse applications of auxiliaries * Thoroughly cross-referenced to enable comparative

    Readership

    Industrial, organic, and pharmaceutical chemists in industry and academia.

    Table of Contents

    ALKYLATION AND RELATED REACTIONS
    REACTIONS OF ALLYL AND BENZYL RELATED CARBANIONS WITH ALKYL AND ACYL ELECTROPHILES
    Alkylation of allyl and benzyl derivatives
    Alkylation of allyl, benzyl and related amines
    Via aminooxazolines
    Via formamidines
    Other derivatives
    Allyl related systems
    Benzyl related systems
    Reaction of allyl ether equivalents
    a-Alkylation
    a-Acylation
    Other electrophiles
    Alkylation of vinyl ethers
    a-Alkylation of allyl and benzyl related silanes
    Allenic ether tandem acylation-cyclization
    REACTIONS OF ALDEHYDE DERIVATIVES WITH ALKYL AND OTHER ELECTROPHILES
    Simple aldehydes
    a-Alkylation
    Via hydrazone derivatives
    Via imine and enamine derivatives
    a-Hydroxylation
    a-Silylation
    Sequential silylation + alkylation
    a-Phosphinylation
    a-Thiolation
    a-Heterosubstituted aldehydes
    a-Alkylation
    a-Amino derivatives
    a-Oxy derivatives
    Sequential alkylation + nucleophilic addition
    a-Silyl derivatives - sequential reactions
    Alkylation + alkylation
    Alkylation + acylation
    a-Phosphino derivatives
    a-Thio derivatives
    Sequential alkylation + acylation
    REACTION OF KETONE DERIVATIVES WITH ALKYL AND OTHER ELECTROPHILES
    a-Alkylation
    Acyclic systems with auxiliary on the ketone
    Simple ketone derivatives
    b-Dicarbonyl derivatives
    b-Keto ester derivatives
    Cyclic systems with auxiliary on the ketone
    Simple ketone derivatives
    C

    Details

    No. of pages:
    1423
    Language:
    English
    Copyright:
    © 2002
    Published:
    Imprint:
    Academic Press
    Print ISBN:
    9780125953498
    Electronic ISBN:
    9780080925424

    About the authors

    Gregory Roos

    Greg Roos’ formal education comprised of a BSc (1971), BSc Honours (1972), and PhD in Organic Synthesis (1976) from the University of Cape Town. A postdoctoral fellowship with Richard Cookson at the University of Southampton was followed by a few years of pharmaceutical industrial experience. His fulltime academic career involved the University of Natal, South Africa (1981-1994), Murdoch University, Australia (1994-1997), and an extended period in the Middle East, including Sultan Qaboos University, Oman (1998-2004) and The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi (2004-2008). He has successfully taught across various cultures and has received awards for his teaching contributions and innovations. Since 2009, as an adjunct Professor at Murdoch University, he shares his time between Australia and Dubai. His research interests have focused on the development of synthetic methodology, with particular interest in asymmetric processes. This provided numerous publications in the areas of the Baylis-Hillman reaction, imidazolidinone chiral auxiliaries, and dirhodium catalyst development and applications. This period also included a number of productive collaborative visits with Tony McKervey (University College Cork & Queen’s University, Belfast), C. K. Sha (Shin Hua University, Taiwan), Mike Doyle (Trinity University, San Antonio), and Ron Warrener (CQU Rockhampton, Queensland). In 2001 he received the Merck Gold Medal for research from the South African Chemical Institute.

    Gregory Roos

    Greg Roos’ formal education comprised of a BSc (1971), BSc Honours (1972), and PhD in Organic Synthesis (1976) from the University of Cape Town. A postdoctoral fellowship with Richard Cookson at the University of Southampton was followed by a few years of pharmaceutical industrial experience. His fulltime academic career involved the University of Natal, South Africa (1981-1994), Murdoch University, Australia (1994-1997), and an extended period in the Middle East, including Sultan Qaboos University, Oman (1998-2004) and The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi (2004-2008). He has successfully taught across various cultures and has received awards for his teaching contributions and innovations. Since 2009, as an adjunct Professor at Murdoch University, he shares his time between Australia and Dubai. His research interests have focused on the development of synthetic methodology, with particular interest in asymmetric processes. This provided numerous publications in the areas of the Baylis-Hillman reaction, imidazolidinone chiral auxiliaries, and dirhodium catalyst development and applications. This period also included a number of productive collaborative visits with Tony McKervey (University College Cork & Queen’s University, Belfast), C. K. Sha (Shin Hua University, Taiwan), Mike Doyle (Trinity University, San Antonio), and Ron Warrener (CQU Rockhampton, Queensland). In 2001 he received the Merck Gold Medal for research from the South African Chemical Institute.