Communication 2000 - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780409101263, 9781483141954

Communication 2000

1st Edition

Authors: J C Huebsch
eBook ISBN: 9781483141954
Imprint: Butterworth-Heinemann
Published Date: 13th July 1987
Page Count: 534
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
70.95
49.66
49.66
49.66
49.66
49.66
56.76
56.76
56.99
39.89
39.89
39.89
39.89
39.89
45.59
45.59
93.95
65.77
65.77
65.77
65.77
65.77
75.16
75.16
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Communication 2000 covers the full range of the communication requirements of business and industry. The contents of the book are organized into seven parts; each part dedicates itself in covering a facet of human communication. The text first covers the fundamentals of communications, such as the essence of human and technical communication. The second part deals with communication models and aids, while the third part tackles the language structure and communication barriers. Next, the book discusses oral and written communication. Part 6 covers topics about research, while Part 7 deals with the general issues in communication, such as troublesome words, communication bugs, and abbreviations. The book will be of great use to individuals who want to expand their understanding about the nature of human communication.

Table of Contents


Part 1 Human Communication

1 The Essence of Human

1 The Essence of Human Communication

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Types of Human Communication

1.3 The Elements of the Communication Process

1.4 Language as Communication Medium

1.5 Non-Verbal and Verbal Communication

1.6 Visual and Oral Communication

2 Technical Communication

2.1 Essence of Technical Communication

2.2 The Aim of Technical Communication

2.3 The Technical Message

2.4 Communication Phases

2.5 Enumeration

2.6 Analysis

2.7 Communication Development Forms

2.8 Supporting Forms of Communication

Part 2 Communication Models and Aids

1 Models

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Persuasion and Convincing

1.3 The Hovland Communication Model

1.4 The A-B-C or Newcomb Model

1.5 The Shannon-Weaver Model

1.6 Collins and Guetzkow's Group Communication Model

1.7 The Thayer Model

1.8 The Westley-Maclean Model

1.9 The Barnlund Model (D.C. Barnlund)

1.10 Prakke's Functional Model

1.11 The Tubbs and Moss Model

1.12 The Berlo Model

1.13 Maletzke's Mass Communication Model

1.14 Van Schoor's Analytical Model

1.15 The Schramm and Osgood Models

1.16 Summary

2 Structures

2.1 The Informal Structure

2.2 The Formal Structure

3 Non-Verbal Management Communication Aids

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Aids

Part 3 The Language Structure and Communication Barriers

1 Style

1.1 Technical and Business Language

1.2 Clarity

1.3 Simplicity

1.4 Naturalness and Spontaneity

1.5 Purposefulness and Appropriateness

1.6 Language Level

1.7 Conciseness

1.8 Concreteness

1.9 Completeness

1.10 Considerateness

1.11 Coherence

1.12 Other Communication Obstacles

1.13 Originality

1.14 Creation of Images (Imagery)

2 Intonation and Stress

2.1 Aspects of Speech

2.2 Word Stress

3 The Pronunciation of English

3.1 Introduction

3.2 The Formation of Vowels

3.3 The Diphthongs

3.4 The Triphthongs

3.5 The Consonants

4 Punctuation

4.1 Introduction

4.2 The Comma

4.3 The Full Stop (Period)

4.4 The Semicolon

4.5 The Colon

4.6 The Dash

4.7 Parentheses (Brackets, Dashes)

4.8 Quotation Marks (Inverted Commas)

4.9 The Ellipsis

4.10 The Apostrophe

4.11 The Hyphen

4.12 The Question Mark

4.13 The Exclamation Mark

4.14 The Brace

4.15 The Virgule

4.16 The X-Sign

4.17 The < And > Signs

5 The Diacritical Marks

5.1 Accents

5.2 Diaeresis

5.3 Cedilla

5.4 The Tilde

5.5 The Circumflex

5.6 Asterisk

5.7 Caret

6 Other Signs

7 Italics

8 Capitalization

8.1 Types of Nouns

8.2 Proper Nouns and Derivatives

8.3 Brand Names

8.4 Compound Proper Nouns

8.5 The Government

8.6 Noun-Number Designations

8.7 Areas of Subject-Matter

8.8 Course Titles

8.9 Official Titles of Rank and Public Office

8.10 Words Denoting Family Relationships

8.11 Direction: Points of the Compass

8.12 Days and Months

8.13 Seasons

8.14 Geographical Terms

8.15 Historical Events

8.16 Additional Uses of Capitalization

9 Plurals

9.1 Nouns Ending in s, x, z, ch or sh

9.2 All Other Proper Nouns

9.3 Most Common Nouns

9.4 Common Nouns Ending in y

9.5 The Plurals of Personal Names Accompanied by Titles

9.6 Nouns Ending in f, fe or ff

9.7 Nouns Ending in o

9.8 Vowel Change

9.9 Some Nouns Take -ren or -en in the Plural

9.10 Nouns Which Remain the Same

9.11 Some Nouns Ending in s

9.12 Compound Nouns

9.14 Abbreviations

9.15 Constructions

9.16 Normal, Scientific and Technical Nouns of Foreign Origin

10 Possession

10.1 Singular Nouns

10.2 Plural Nouns

10.3 Note the Following

10.4 Inanimate Objects

10.5 Organizations

11 Spelling

11.1 One-Syllable Words Ending in Consonant-Vowel-Consonant

11.2 Two-Syllable Words Ending in Consonant-Vowel-Consonant and Accented in the Second Syllable

11.3 Words Ending in a Silent (Mute) e Preceded by a Consonant

11.4 Soft c

11.5 Words Made up of a Prefix and a Root

11.6 Mnemonics

11.7 Polysyllabic Words Ending in a Single Consonant and Accented on the Last Syllable

12 Syllabication (Division of Words)

13 Abbreviations

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Contractions

13.3 Ordinary Abbreviations

13.4 Acronyms

13.5 The Letter-Group

13.6 Plurals

13.7 Pay Attention to the Following

14 Synonyms

15 Antonyms

16 Homonyms

17 Homophones

18 Paronyms

19 Translations

20 Application

Part 4 Oral Communication

1 Introduction

1.1 Hints for The Speaker

1.2 Hints for The Listener

1.3 The Dialogue

2 The Speech or Oral Delivery

2.1 Preparation

2.2 Knowledge of The Topic

2.3 Organizing the Subject-Matter

2.4 Types of Speeches

2.5 Aids and Deliveries

2.6 The Purpose of the Speech

2.7 Presentation of the Message Content

3 The Telephone

3.1 Introduction

4 Other Oral Communication Forms

4.1 The Debate

4.2 The Panel Discussion (Forum)

4.3 The Symposium

4.4 The Lecture Forum

4.5 The Conference

4.6 The Seminar

4.7 The Colloquium

4.8 The Round Table

4.9 Meetings

4.10 The Oral Report

4.11 The Interview

5 Application

Part 5 Written Communication

1 Letter Writing

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Basic Human Needs

1.3 Letter Writing: Hints

1.4 Letter Writing: General Characteristics

1.5 The Functions of Letter Writing

1.6 Types of Letters

1.7 Method of Preparing and Sending Formal Letters

1.8 Letter Writing: Structure

2 Examples of Correspondence

2.1 Private Person to an Organization

2.2 Organization or Firm to Private Person

2.3 Organization/Firm to Organization/Firm

2.4 Examples of Professional Correspondence

2.5 Letters to the Press

2.6 Letters of Complaint

2.7 The Letter of Application

2.8 Public Relations Letters

2.9 Letter Announcing A Press Conference

2.10 The Sales Letter

2.11 Collecting Money: Letters

2.12 Official Letters

2.13 Circulars

2.14 Medical Correspondence

2.15 The Quotation

2.16 Forms

2.17 The Testimonial

2.18 The Résumé (Curriculum Vitae)

2.19 The Covering Letter

2.20 The Letter of Resignation

2.21 Telegrams and Telex Messages

2.22 Classified Advertisements

2.23 Indexing and Summary of Correspondence

2.24 Official Letters: Hints on Method and Preparation

2.25 The Formal Invitation and Reply

3 Applications

4 The Report

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Definitions

4.3 The Memorandum

4.4 The Report

5 Applications

6 The Questionnaire

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Compilation of the Questionnaire

6.3 Requirements

6.4 Instructions

6.5 Formulation of Questions

6.6 Advantages of Questionnaire

6.7 Other Matters

6.8 Types of Questionnaires

6.9 Types of Questions

6.10 Examples of Questionnaires

7 Advertising

7.1 Introduction

7.2 The Purpose of Advertising

7.3 The Psychological Aspect

7.4 Types of Advertising

7.5 Hints For Writing Advertisements

7.6 Press Advertising

7.7 Classified Advertisements

7.8 Public Announcements

7.9 Exaggeration in Advertisements

7.10 Application

8 The Précis

8.1 Introduction

8.2 The Précis (Summary)

8.3 Guidelines

8.4 Application

9 Comprehension

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Types of Questions

9.3 Application

10 Paraphrasing

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Hints for Paraphrasing

10.3 Applications

11 The Extended Essay (Treatise)

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Hints

12 The Essay

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Hints

12.3 Planning

12.4 Types of Essays

13 Meeting Procedures

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Two Main Types of Meetings

13.3 The Purpose f Meetings

13.4 The Control of Meetings

13.5 Constitutional Regulations

13.6 Voting

13.7 The Foundation Meeting

13.8 Notice of a Meeting

13.9 The Agenda

13.10 The Minutes

13.11 Effective Participation in a Meeting

13.12 Important Terms Used at a Meeting

13.13 Examples of Notices and Agendas

13.14 Examples of Minutes

13.15 Expressions Used in the Writing of Minutes

13.16 Application

Part 6 Research

1 The Library

1.1 Dictionaries

1.2 The Library: Use

2 Referencing

2.1 Footnotes and Endnotes - Bibliography Format

2.2 The List of Reference Sources

2.3 The Harvard Method

2.4 Abbreviations Frequently Used in the Bibliography

Part 7 General

1 Troublesome Words

2 Communication Bugs

3 Extension of Vocabulary: Parts of Speech

3.1 Nouns

3.2 Verbs

3.3 Adjectives

3.4 Prepositions

4 Vocational Terminology

4.1 Electrotechnical Engineering

4.2 Mechanical Engineering

4.3 Civil Engineering

4.4 Metallurgy

4.5 Aerodynamics

4.6 Marine

4.7 Motor

4.8 Mathematics

4.9 Radio and Television

5 Expressions to be Used in Oral and Written Communication

6 Words to Remember

7 Roman Numerals

8 Proofreaders' Marks

9 The Metric System

9.1 Metric (Si-) Units

9.2 Metric (Si-) Calculations

9.3 Si-Preference Prefixes

10 Symbols

11 Abbreviations

11.1 Ordinary Abbreviations

11.2 Letter-Groups

11.3 Acronyms (Letter-Words, Letter-Names)

11.4 Common Business Abbreviations

11.5 Common Banking Abbreviations

11.6 Common Medical Abbreviations

11.7 Technical Abbreviations

12 Troublesome Sentences: Errors

13 Examination Papers

Bibliography


Details

No. of pages:
534
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Butterworth-Heinemann 1986
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
eBook ISBN:
9781483141954

About the Author

J C Huebsch