Communicating Pictures - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780124059061, 9780080993744

Communicating Pictures

1st Edition

A Course in Image and Video Coding

Authors: David Bull
eBook ISBN: 9780080993744
Hardcover ISBN: 9780124059061
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 20th June 2014
Page Count: 560
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Description

Communicating Pictures starts with a unique historical perspective of the role of images in communications and then builds on this to explain the applications and requirements of a modern video coding system. It draws on the author's extensive academic and professional experience of signal processing and video coding to deliver a text that is algorithmically rigorous, yet accessible, relevant to modern standards, and practical. It offers a thorough grounding in visual perception, and demonstrates how modern image and video compression methods can be designed in order to meet the rate-quality performance levels demanded by today's applications, networks and users.
With this book you will learn:

  • Practical issues when implementing a codec, such as picture boundary extension and complexity reduction, with particular emphasis on efficient algorithms for transforms, motion estimators and error resilience
  • Conflicts between conventional video compression, based on variable length coding and spatiotemporal prediction, and the requirements for error resilient transmission
  • How to assess the quality of coded images and video content, both through subjective trials and by using perceptually optimised objective metrics
  • Features, operation and performance of the state-of-the-art High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard

Key Features

  • Covers the basics of video communications and includes a strong grounding in how we perceive images and video, and how we can exploit redundancy to reduce bitrate and improve rate distortion performance
  • Gives deep insight into the pitfalls associated with the transmission of real-time video over networks (wireless and fixed)
  • Uses the state-of- the-art video coding standard (H.264/AVC) as a basis for algorithm development in the context of block based compression
  • Insight into future video coding standards such as the new ISO/ITU High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) initiative, which extends and generalizes the H.264/AVC approach

Readership

Video and Image processing R&D engineers, wireless and networking engineers; undergraduate and postgraduate students taking a course in image and video coding.

Table of Contents

  • About the Author
  • Preface
    • Early visual communications
    • Mobility and print
    • Artistic impression, painting, and perspective
    • Photographic film and motion pictures
    • Television
    • Pervasive media and the internet
    • This book
  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • List of algorithms
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1. Introduction
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Communicating pictures: the need for compression
    • 1.2 Applications and drivers
    • 1.3 Requirements and trade-offs in a compression system
    • 1.4 The basics of compression
    • 1.5 The need for standards
    • 1.6 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 2. The Human Visual System
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Principles and theories of human vision
    • 2.2 Acquisition: the human eye
    • 2.3 The visual cortex
    • 2.4 Visual fields and acuity
    • 2.5 Color processing
    • 2.6 Spatial processing
    • 2.7 Perception of scale and depth
    • 2.8 Temporal and spatio-temporal response
    • 2.9 Attention and eye movements
    • 2.10 Visual masking
    • 2.11 Summary: a perceptual basis for image and video compression
    • References
  • Chapter 3. Discrete-Time Analysis for Images and Video
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Signal and picture sampling
    • 3.2 Statistics of images
    • 3.3 Filtering and transforms
    • 3.4 Quantization
    • 3.5 Linear prediction
    • 3.6 Information and entropy
    • 3.7 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 4. Digital Picture Formats and Representations
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Pixels, blocks, and pictures
    • 4.2 Formats and aspect ratios
    • 4.3 Picture scanning
    • 4.4 Gamma correction
    • 4.5 Color spaces and color transformations
    • 4.6 Measuring and comparing picture quality
    • 4.7 Rates and distortions
    • 4.8 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 5. Transforms for Image and Video Coding
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 The principles of decorrelating transforms
    • 5.2 Unitary transforms
    • 5.3 Basic transforms
    • 5.4 Optimum transforms
    • 5.5 Discrete cosine transform (DCT)
    • 5.6 Quantization of DCT coefficients
    • 5.7 Performance comparisons
    • 5.8 DCT implementation
    • 5.9 JPEG
    • 5.10 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 6. Filter Banks and Wavelet Compression
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Introduction to multiscale processing
    • 6.2 Perfect reconstruction filter banks
    • 6.3 Multirate filtering
    • 6.4 Useful filters and filter banks
    • 6.5 Coefficient quantization and bit allocation
    • 6.6 JPEG2000
    • 6.7 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 7. Lossless Compression Methods
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Motivation for lossless image compression
    • 7.2 Symbol encoding
    • 7.3 Huffman coding
    • 7.4 Symbol formation and encoding
    • 7.5 Golomb coding
    • 7.6 Arithmetic coding
    • 7.7 Performance comparisons—Huffman vs arithmetic coding
    • 7.8 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 8. Coding Moving Pictures: Motion Prediction
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Temporal correlation and exploiting temporal redundancy
    • 8.2 Motion models and motion estimation
    • 8.3 Block matching motion estimation (BMME)
    • 8.4 Reduced complexity motion estimation
    • 8.5 Motion vector coding
    • 8.6 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 9. The Block-Based Hybrid Video Codec
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 The block-based hybrid model for video compression
    • 9.2 Intra-frame prediction
    • 9.3 Sub-pixel motion estimation
    • 9.4 Multiple reference frame motion estimation
    • 9.5 Variable block sizes for motion estimation
    • 9.6 Variable sized transforms
    • 9.7 In-loop deblocking operations
    • 9.8 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 10. Measuring and Managing Picture Quality
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 General considerations and influences
    • 10.2 Subjective testing
    • 10.3 Test data sets and how to use them
    • 10.4 Objective quality metrics
    • 10.5 Rate–distortion optimization
    • 10.6 Rate control
    • 10.7 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 11. Communicating Pictures: Delivery Across Networks
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 The operating environment
    • 11.2 The effects of loss
    • 11.3 Mitigating the effect of bitstream errors
    • 11.4 Transport layer solutions
    • 11.5 Application layer solutions
    • 11.6 Cross layer solutions
    • 11.7 Inherently robust coding strategies
    • 11.8 Error concealment
    • 11.9 Congestion management and scalable video coding
    • 11.10 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 12. Video Coding Standards
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 The need for and role of standards
    • 12.2 H.120
    • 12.3 H.261
    • 12.4 MPEG-2/DVB
    • 12.5 H.263
    • 12.6 MPEG-4
    • 12.7 H.264/AVC
    • 12.8 H.265/HEVC
    • 12.9 Other de-facto standards and proprietary codecs
    • 12.10 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 13. Communicating Pictures—The Future
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 The motivation: more immersive experiences
    • 13.2 Emerging formats and extended video parameter spaces
    • 13.3 Challenges for compression
    • 13.4 Parametric video compression
    • 13.5 Context-based video compression
    • 13.6 Summary
    • References
  • Appendix A. Glossary of Terms
  • Appendix B. Tutorial Problems
    • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Chapter 2: The human visual system
    • Chapter 3: Discrete-time analysis for images and video
    • Chapter 4: Digital picture formats and representations
    • Chapter 5: Transforms for image and video coding
    • Chapter 6: Filter banks and wavelet compression
    • Chapter 7: Lossless compression methods
    • Chapter 8: Coding moving pictures: motion prediction
    • Chapter 9: The block-based hybrid video codec
    • Chapter 10: Measuring and managing picture quality
    • Chapter 11: Communicating pictures: delivery across networks
    • Chapter 12: Video coding standards
    • Chapter 13: Communicating pictures—the future
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
560
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780080993744
Hardcover ISBN:
9780124059061

About the Author

David Bull

David Bull

David Bull is the Chair in Signal Processing and Head of the Visual Information Laboratory at the University of Bristol, and Director of the Bristol Vision Institute. His research interests are focused on image and video communications and analysis for wireless, internet and broadcast applications. He has published over 450 academic papers, various articles, three books and numerous patents, many of which have been exploited commercially. He has undertaken a wide range of consultation activities for both industries and governments around the world.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Bristol, U.K.