Colloid and Interface Science in Pharmaceutical Research and Development - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444626141, 9780444626080

Colloid and Interface Science in Pharmaceutical Research and Development

1st Edition

Editors: Hiroyuki Ohshima Kimiko Makino
eBook ISBN: 9780444626080
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444626141
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 18th July 2014
Page Count: 532
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Description

Colloid and Interface Science in Pharmaceutical Research and Development describes the role of colloid and surface chemistry in the pharmaceutical sciences. It gives a detailed account of colloid theory, and explains physicochemical properties of the colloidal-pharmaceutical systems, and the methods for their measurement.

The book starts with fundamentals in Part I, covering fundamental aspects of colloid and interface sciences as applied to pharmaceutical sciences and thus should be suitable for teaching. Parts II and III treat applications and measurements, and they explains the application of these properties and their influence and use for the development of new drugs.

Key Features

  • Provides a clear description of the fundamentals of colloid and interface science relevant to drug research and development
  • Explains the physicochemical/colloidal basis of pharmaceutical science
  • Lists modern experimental characterization techniques, provides analytical equations and explanations on analyzing the experimental data
  • Describes the most advanced techniques, AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), SFA (Surface Force Apparatus) in detail

Readership

Primarily for engineers, and students in the field of pharmaceutical science who want to understand colloid and interface science. This book can be used both for teaching and research. Secondarily for scientists, engineers, and students in the field of colloid and interface science who want to understand pharmaceutical science.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Interaction of colloidal particles
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Potential distribution around a charged surface: the Poisson–Boltzmann equation
    • 1.3 Electrical double layer interaction between two particles
    • 1.4 van der Waals interaction between two particles
    • 1.5 DLVO theory of colloid stability
    • 1.6 Conclusion
  • Chapter 2: Colloid and interface aspects of pharmaceutical science
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 General introduction
    • 2.2 Disperse systems
    • 2.3 Surface activity and colloidal properties of drugs
    • 2.4 Naturally occurring micelle forming systems
    • 2.5 Biological implications of the presence of surfactants in pharmaceutical formulations
    • 2.6 Solubilised systems
    • 2.7 Liposomes and vesicles in pharmacy
    • 2.8 Stabilisation of liposomes by incorporation of block copolymers
    • 2.9 Nanoparticles, drug delivery and drug targetting
    • 2.10 The reticuloendothelial system
    • 2.11 Influence of particle characteristics
    • 2.12 Surface-modified polystyrene particles as model carriers
    • 2.13 Biodegradable polymeric carriers
  • Chapter 3: Interfacial properties of therapeutic pulmonary surfactants studied by thin liquid films
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Thin liquid films and methods for their experimental research
    • 3.3 Black foam films
    • 3.4 Therapeutic pulmonary surfactants
    • 3.5 Inhibitory effect on therapeutic pulmonary surfactants
    • 3.6 Wetting behaviour of pulmonary surfactant aqueous solutions
    • 3.7 Conclusions
  • Chapter 4: Surface interactions in propellant driven metered dose inhaler product design
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Surfactant behaviour in non-aqueous solution
    • 4.3 Particle behaviour in non-aqueous solution
    • 4.4 Aerosol droplet formation and dispersion
    • 4.5 Formulation development strategy
    • 4.6 Conclusion
  • Chapter 5: Particle-manufacturing technology-based inhalation therapy for pulmonary diseases
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Pulmonary diseases
    • 5.3 Lung defence system
    • 5.4 Characteristics of inhalable particles
    • 5.5 Manufacturing technologies for production of inhalable particles
    • 5.6 Clinical applications of inhalable particles
    • 5.7 Summary
  • Chapter 6: QSAR study for transdermal delivery of drugs and chemicals
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Viewpoints of the conventional QSAR
    • 6.3 QSAR descriptors of hydrophobicity
    • 6.4 Pharmaceutical approaches of QSAR
    • 6.5 Thermodynamic parameters of dissolution and melting
  • Chapter 7: Nanoparticles for transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS)
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Nanoparticles for transdermal drug delivery
    • 7.3 Combination of nanoparticle system and IP
    • 7.4 Improved nanoparticles for iontophoretic transdermal drug delivery
    • 7.5 Conclusions
  • Chapter 8: Interfacial and colloidal properties of emulsified systems: Pharmaceutical and biological perspective
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Types of emulsion
    • 8.3 Colloidal and interfacial properties of emulsified systems
    • 8.4 Mechanism of emulsion formation and stabilisation
    • 8.5 Pharmaceutical aspects of emulsified systems
    • 8.6 Emulsifying agents and their mechanism of stabilisation
    • 8.7 Behaviour of emulsions in biological milieu
    • 8.8 Oral administration
    • 8.9 Parenteral administration
    • 8.10 New class of emulsifying agents
    • 8.11 Modifications and recent advances in emulsified systems as a drug delivery vehicle
    • 8.12 Conclusion
  • Chapter 9: Size-based characterisation of nanomaterials by Taylor dispersion analysis
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgements
    • 9.1 Introduction and theoretical aspect
    • 9.2 Corrections
    • 9.3 Double/single-detection point(s) for TDA
    • 9.4 Polydisperse and monodisperse samples: signal integration and average diffusion coefficient
    • 9.5 Applications of TDA
  • Chapter 10: Peculiarities of live cells’ interaction with micro- and nanoparticles
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Experiment
    • 10.3 Theory
    • 10.4 Conclusions
    • Appendix General concepts of live cell electrophysiology
  • Chapter 11: Micropatterning of cell aggregate in three dimension for in vivo mimicking cell culture
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgements
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Cell patterning techniques
    • 11.3 Conclusion
  • Chapter 12: Adhesion-dependent cell Regulation via Adhesion molecule, integrin: Therapeutic application of integrin activation-modulating factors
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Eradication of acute myelogenous leukaemia by combination therapy of anticancer drug with antiadhesive peptide FNIII14
    • 12.2 Potentiated and sustained activation of VLA-4 and VLA-5 accelerates proplatelet-like formation
    • 12.3 Concluding remarks
  • Chapter 13: PEGylation for biocompatible surface
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Basic character of PEG
    • 13.3 Biofouling resistant mechanism on PEG modified surface based on the molecular structure
    • 13.4 PEGylation
    • 13.5 PEGylated block copolymer for nanostructured materials and surfaces
    • 13.6 PEGylated for the fabrication of high-performance metal nanoparticles
    • 13.7 Conclusion
  • Chapter 14: PEGylated polymer micelles for anticancer drug delivery carrier
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Polymer micelles as an anticancer drug delivery carrier
    • 14.3 PEG-b-PVBP block copolymer-based PEGylated polymer micelles (DOX@PNP)
    • 14.4 Enhanced intracellular drug delivery of DOX@PNPs in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells
    • 14.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 15: Convective diffusion of nanoparticles to regional lymph nodes from the epithelial barrier
    • Abstract
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Modelling fluid flow in interstitium around initial capillary initiated by intrinsic pump
    • 15.3 Distribution of fluid velocity in the interstitium between the EB and an adjacent ILC
    • 15.4 Time of transport through interstitium
    • 15.5 Discussion
    • 15.6 Summary and conclusions
  • Chapter 16: Highly fluorinated colloids in drug delivery and imaging
    • Abstract
    • 16.1 Properties of F-compounds
    • 16.2 Nano-sized F-colloids
    • 16.3 Micron-sized F-colloids
  • Chapter 17: Cell-penetrating peptide polymer nanomicelle-based cytosol-sensitive nucleotide delivery systems
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgements
    • 17.1 Introduction
    • 17.2 Overview of cytosol-sensitive polymer for gene delivery
    • 17.3 Cytoplasm-sensitive artificial CPP micelles
    • 17.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 18: Cycloamylose-based nanocarriers as a nucleic acid delivery system
    • Abstract
    • 18.1 Introduction
    • 18.2 Polymer-based nucleic acid nanocarriers
    • 18.3 Cycloamylose
    • 18.4 Functionalized cycloamylose for siRNA delivery
    • 18.5 Functional cycloamylose for pDNA delivery
    • 18.6 Cycloamylose nanogel gene delivery: enhancing endosomal escape using phospholipase A2
    • 18.7 Conclusion
  • Chapter 19: Colloidal drug delivery system for brain-targeting therapy
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgement
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Colloidal drug delivery system in pharmaceutical application
    • 19.3 Colloidal formulation for treating brain pathology and disease
  • Chapter 20: Colloidal carriers for noninvasive delivery of insulin
    • Abstract
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 Noninvasive routes of insulin delivery
    • 20.3 Barriers to noninvasive insulin delivery
    • 20.4 Colloidal carriers for noninvasive insulin delivery
    • 20.5 Market status of noninvasive insulin delivery system
    • 20.6 Future scope
  • Chapter 21: Particle geometry, charge, and wettability: The fate of nanoparticle-based drug vehicles
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgements
    • 21.1 Introduction
    • 21.2 Drug adsorption
    • 21.3 Transport in the blood vessels
    • 21.4 Particle uptake by tumour cells
    • 21.5 Particle release and toxicity
  • Chapter 22: Lipid emulsions and lipid vesicles prepared from various phospholipids as drug carriers
    • Abstract
    • 22.1 Introduction
    • 22.2 Particle size and entrapment in liposomes prepared with egg yolk lecithins and hydrogenated egg yolk lecithins
    • 22.3 Properties of various PCs as emulsifiers or dispersing agents in nanoparticle preparations for drug carriers
    • 22.4 Physicochemical properties of structured PC in drug carrier lipid emulsions
    • 22.5 Conclusion
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
532
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780444626080
Hardcover ISBN:
9780444626141

About the Editor

Hiroyuki Ohshima

Hiroyuki Ohshima is a Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Tokyo University of Science, Japan. He is the author or co-author of 10 books and over 300 book chapters and journal publications reflecting his research interests in colloid and interface sciences as well as biophysical chemistry. He spent his post-doc life at University of Melbourne, State University of New York at Buffalo, and University of Utah. Dr. Ohshima received the B.S. (1968), M.S. (1970), and Ph.D. (1974) degrees in physics from the University of Tokyo, Japan. Currently he edits two journals, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (Elsevier) and Colloid and Polymer Science (Springer).

Affiliations and Expertise

Tokyo University of Science Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Noda, Chiba, Japan

Kimiko Makino

Kimiko Makino is a Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Tokyo University of Science, Japan. She is the author or co-author of 1 book and over 120 book chapters and journal publications reflecting her research interests in colloid and interface sciences as well as pharmaceutical science. She spent her post-doc life at University of Utah. Dr. Makino received the B.S. (1979), M.S. (1981), and Ph.D. (1986) degrees in pharmaceutical science from Tokyo University of Science. She currently serves as the head of the Center for Physical Pharmaceutics of Tokyo University of Science. She has just been appointed as new Co-Editor in Chief of Journal of Microencapsulation (Informa Healthcare/Taylor & Francis).

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Sciences, Noda, Chiba, Japan