Coffee in Health and Disease Prevention - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780124095175, 9780124167162

Coffee in Health and Disease Prevention

1st Edition

Editors: Victor Preedy
eBook ISBN: 9780124167162
Hardcover ISBN: 9780124095175
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 3rd November 2014
Page Count: 1080
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Description

Coffee in Health and Disease Prevention presents a comprehensive look at the compounds in coffee, their reported benefits (or toxicity risks) and also explores them on a health-condition specific level, providing researchers and academics with a single-volume resource to help in identifying potential treatment uses. No other book on the market considers all the varieties of coffee in one volume, or takes the disease-focused approach that will assist in directing further research and studies.

The book embraces a holistic approach and effectively investigates coffee and its specific compounds from the biochemical to the nutritional well-being of geographical populations. This book represents essential reading for researchers in nutrition, dietetics, food science, biochemistry, and public health.

Key Features

  • Presents one comprehensive, translational source for all aspects of how coffee plays a role in disease prevention and health
  • Experts in nutrition, diet, and food chemistry (from all areas of academic and medical research) take readers from the bench research (cellular and biochemical mechanisms of vitamins and nutrients) to new preventive and therapeutic approaches
  • Focuses on coffee composition; nutritional aspects of coffee; protective aspects of coffee-related compounds; specific coffee components and their effects on tissue and organ systems
  • Features sections on both the general effects of coffee consumption on the body as well as the effects of specific coffee compounds on specific organ systems

Readership

Researchers in nutrition, dietetics, food science, food chemistry, biochemistry, and public health

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Biography
  • Section 1. Introductory and General Text
    • Part 1.1. The Plant
      • Chapter 1. The Coffee Plant and Beans: An Introduction
        • 1.1. The Plant
        • 1.2. Green Coffee Production
        • 1.3. Summary Points
      • Chapter 2. Highlights in the History of Coffee Science Related to Health
        • 2.1. Introduction
        • 2.2. Coffee, Health, and Science
        • 2.3. Main Bioactive Substances in Coffee
        • 2.4. Implications of the Amount Consumed
        • 2.5. Coffee and Associated Habits
        • 2.6. Effects Related to Organs and Diseases
        • 2.7. Coffee and Nutrition
        • 2.8. Concluding Remarks
        • 2.9. Summary Points
      • Chapter 3. Plant Biochemistry: Trigonelline Biosynthesis in Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora
        • 3.1. Introduction
        • 3.2. Secondary Metabolites Produced in Coffee Plants
        • 3.3. Occurrence of Trigonelline
        • 3.4. Biosynthesis of Trigonelline
        • 3.5. Degradation of Trigonelline
        • 3.6. Physiological Aspects of Trigonelline Metabolism in Coffee
        • 3.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 4. Coffea Genome Organization and Evolution
        • 4.1. Introduction
        • 4.2. Genomic Divergence
        • 4.3. Genetic Diversity Based on Transposable Elements
        • 4.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 5. Caffeine-free Species in the Genus Coffea
        • 5.1. Introduction
        • 5.2. Caffeine Content, Botanical Classification, and Geographical Distribution of the Species
        • 5.3. Genetic Control of Caffeine Biosynthesis
        • 5.4. Caffeine Content and Duration of the Flowering–Fructification Period
        • 5.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 6. Characterization of Coffee Genes Involved in Isoprenoid and Diterpene Metabolic Pathways
        • 6.1. Introduction
        • 6.2. Overview of the Isoprenoid Metabolic Pathway
        • 6.3. Chemical Composition and Biochemical Analysis of Diterpenes
        • 6.4. Regulatory Enzymes and Candidate Genes Involved in Isoprenoid and Diterpene Biosynthesis
        • 6.5. Conclusions
        • 6.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 7. Botanical Aspects of the Antioxidant System in Coffee
        • 7.1. Introduction
        • 7.2. Conclusions
      • Chapter 8. Coffee Industry in India: Production to Consumption—A Sustainable Enterprise
        • 8.1. Introduction
        • 8.2. Overview of Indian Coffee Industry
        • 8.3. Trends in Coffee Exports and Consumption
        • 8.4. Indian Coffees: Quality Perspective
        • 8.5. History of Coffee Cultivation in India and Early Cultivated Varieties
        • 8.6. Unique Features of Coffee Cultivation in India
        • 8.7. Genetic Resources and Diversity of Coffee Gene Pool
        • 8.8. Coffee Germplasm in India
        • 8.9. Molecular Characterization of Representative Coffee Germplasm Available in India
        • 8.10. Coffee Species Endemic to India
        • 8.11. Taxonomic Status of Indigenous Psilanthus Species Compared with Coffea Species
        • 8.12. Growth Habit and Agronomic Traits of Interest of Indigenous Coffee Species
        • 8.13. Genetic Improvement and Commercially Grown Varieties in Indian Context
        • 8.14. Future Perspective
        • 8.15. Summary points
    • Part 1.2. Coffee Processing
      • Chapter 9. Coffee Beans and Processing
        • 9.1. Introduction
        • 9.2. The Mode of Processing Influences Coffee Quality
        • 9.3. Coffee Seeds Exhibit Active Metabolism during Processing
        • 9.4. Seed Germination in the Course of Green Coffee Processing
        • 9.5. Green Coffee Beans Suffer Drought Stress while Drying
        • 9.6. Material Differences in Differently Processed Green Coffees
        • 9.7. Deliberately Influencing the Metabolism of Green Coffee to Improve Its Quality
        • 9.8. Conclusion
        • 9.9. Summary Points
      • Chapter 10. Chemical Changes in the Components of Coffee Beans during Roasting
        • 10.1. Introduction
        • 10.2. Components in Roasted Coffee Beans
        • 10.3. The Roasting Degrees
        • 10.4. Changes of Carbohydrates
        • 10.5. Changes of Chlorogenic Acids
        • 10.6. Changes of Trigonelline
        • 10.7. Changes of Proteins and Free Amino Acids
        • 10.8. Formation of Aroma Components
        • 10.9. Torrefacto Roasting
      • Chapter 11. Generating Biomedical Polyphenolic Compounds from Spent Coffee or Silverskin
        • 11.1. Introduction
        • 11.2. Polyphenolic Compounds in Spent Coffee and Silverskin and Benefits for Human Health
        • 11.3. Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Natural Sources
        • 11.4. Technologies for Extraction of Polyphenolic Compounds from Spent Coffee
        • 11.5. Technologies for Extraction of Polyphenolic Compounds from Coffee Silverskin
        • 11.6. Conclusions
        • 11.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 12. Authentication of Coffee Blends
        • 12.1. Introduction
        • 12.2. Chromatography-Based Analytical Techniques
        • 12.3. Spectroscopy-Based Analytical Techniques
        • 12.4. Genetic Engineering-Based Analytical Techniques
        • 12.5. Summary Points
    • Part 1.3. Constituents and Composition
      • Chapter 13. Unsaponifiable Matter of Coffee
        • 13.1. Introduction
        • 13.2. Analytical Techniques for Oil Extraction and Unsaponifiable Matter Analysis
        • 13.3. Composition of Coffee Oil
        • 13.4. Unsaponifiable Matter Composition: Influence of Coffee Species and Roasting Process
        • 13.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 14. Volatile Chemicals from Thermal Degradation of Less Volatile Coffee Components
        • 14.1. Introduction
        • 14.2. Volatile Chemicals FormED from Lipids in Coffee
        • 14.3. Volatile Chemicals FormED from Carbohydrates and Sugars in Coffee
        • 14.4. Volatile Chemicals FormED in Coffee by Maillard Reaction
        • 14.5. Volatile Compounds FormED from Amino Acids and Proteins
        • 14.6. Volatile Chemicals Formed from Quinic Acid, Caffeic Acid, and Chlorogenic Acids
        • 14.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 15. Phenolic Compounds in Coffee Compared to Other Beverages
        • 15.1. Introduction
        • 15.2. Phenolic Compounds in Coffee
        • 15.3. Phenolic Compounds in Tea
        • 15.4. Phenolic Compounds in Wine
        • 15.5. Phenolic Compounds in Fruit Juices
        • 15.6. Concluding Remarks
        • 15.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 16. Isoflavones in Coffee
        • 16.1. Introduction
        • 16.2. Isoflavones in Coffee
        • 16.3. Conclusion
        • 16.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 17. Organic Compounds in Green Coffee Beans
        • 17.1. Introduction
        • 17.2. Composition of Green Coffee Beans
        • 17.3. Caffeine
        • 17.4. Trigonelline
        • 17.5. Chlorogenic Acids
        • 17.6. Organic Acids
        • 17.7. Sucrose and Other Reducing Sugars
        • 17.8. Polysaccharides
        • 17.9. Protein and Amino Acids
        • 17.10. Lipids
        • 17.11. Minerals
        • 17.12. Chemical Composition of Defective Coffee Beans
      • Chapter 18. Polysaccharides in Coffee and Their Relationship to Health: An Overview
        • 18.1. Introduction
        • 18.2. Green Coffee
        • 18.3. Roasted Coffee
        • 18.4. Health Aspects of Coffee Polysaccharides
        • 18.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 19. Galactomannans in Coffee
        • 19.1. Introduction
        • 19.2. Structural Features of Green Coffee Galactomannans
        • 19.3. Effect of the Roasting Process on the Structure of Coffee Galactomannans
        • 19.4. Potential Health Implications of Coffee Polysaccharides
        • 19.5. The Effect of Galactomannans on Organoleptic Properties of Coffee Beverages
        • 19.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 20. Melanoidins in Coffee
        • 20.1. Introduction
        • 20.2. Chemical Composition
        • 20.3. Mechanistic Formation and Structure of Coffee Melanoidins
        • 20.4. Final Remarks
        • 20.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 21. Chlorogenic Acids from Coffee
        • 21.1. Introduction
        • 21.2. CGAS in Green Coffee Beans
        • 21.3. CGAS in Roasted Coffee Beans
        • 21.4. CGAS in Defective Coffee Beans, Spent Coffee Grounds, and Coffee Silverskin
        • 21.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 22. Caffeine in Coffee
        • 22.1. Introduction
        • 22.2. Content of Caffeine in Coffee and in Nutritional and Medical Products
        • 22.3. Caffeine Consumption
        • 22.4. Pharmacokinetics of Caffeine
        • 22.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 23. Coffee and Hippuric Acid
        • 23.1. Introduction
        • 23.2. Metabolism of CGA to HA
        • 23.3. Elevation of HA in Human Studies
        • 23.4. Variation of Colonic Microflora
        • 23.5. Biological Properties of CGA and HA
        • 23.6. Other Sources of HA
        • 23.7. Present Status in the Estimation of Toluene Exposure in the Occupational Field
        • 23.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 24. Factors Affecting Acrylamide Levels in Coffee Beverages
        • 24.1. Introduction
        • 24.2. Factors Affecting Acrylamide Levels in Coffee Beverages
        • 24.3. Reduction of Acrylamide in Coffee Products
        • 24.4. Conclusion
        • 24.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 25. Mycotoxins in Coffee
        • 25.1. Introduction
        • 25.2. What are Mycotoxins?
        • 25.3. Major Mycotoxins in Coffee
        • 25.4. Coffee Processing and Mycotoxin Contamination
        • 25.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 26. Pesticide Residues in Coffee Agroecosystems
        • 26.1. Introduction
        • 26.2. Pesticides (Fungicides, Herbicides, Insecticides, and Nematicides)
        • 26.3. New Strategies for Reducing Pesticide Residues in Coffee
        • 26.4. Summary Points
    • Part 1.4. Coffee Types and Coffee Drinking Culture
      • Chapter 27. Physicochemical Characteristics of Roasted Coffee
        • 27.1. Introduction
        • 27.2. Physical and Structural Characteristics of Roasted Coffee Beans
        • 27.3. Chemical Composition
        • 27.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 28. Espresso Machine and Coffee Composition
        • 28.1. Introduction
        • 28.2. Espresso Coffee Machine: Working Principles
        • 28.3. Influence of Water Temperature and Water Pressure on ECs Quality
        • 28.4. Time Portions: Extraction Kinetic
        • 28.5. Conclusions
        • 28.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 29. Boiled Coffee: An Arctic Example of Potential Residual and Unmeasured Confounding in Coffee Epidemiology
        • 29.1. Introduction
        • 29.2. Residual and Unmeasured Confounding in Coffee Epidemiology
        • 29.3. Coffee: A Part of the Scandinavian Culture Since the 1700s
        • 29.4. Chemical Implications of the Preparation of Boiled Coffee
        • 29.5. Risk Associations in Boiled and Filtered Coffee
        • 29.6. Lifestyle Factors Associated with Consumption of Boiled and Filtered Coffee
        • 29.7. Discussion
        • 29.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 30. Personality Traits and Coffee Intake
        • 30.1. Introduction
        • 30.2. Personality Traits Associated with Coffee and Caffeine Intake
        • 30.3. Differential Response to Caffeine According to Personality Traits and Psychiatric Disorders
        • 30.4. Chronic Use of Coffee, Personality Traits, and Psychiatric Disorders
        • 30.5. Conclusions
        • 30.6. Summary Points
    • Part 1.5. By-Products and Secondary Usage
      • Chapter 31. An Overview of the Potential Uses for Coffee Husks
        • 31.1. Introduction
        • 31.2. Coffee Processing
        • 31.3. Chemical Composition of CHS and CP
        • 31.4. Review of Proposals for the Profitable Exploitation of CHS and CP
        • 31.5. Concluding Remarks
        • 31.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 32. Use of Coffee Husk Waste for Production of Biopesticides for Mosquito Control
        • 32.1. Introduction
        • 32.2. Method of Biopesticide Production from CHW
        • 32.3. Salient Features of the Study
        • 32.4. Conclusion
        • 32.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 33. Production of Selenium-Enriched Mushrooms in Coffee Husks and Use of This Colonized Residue
        • 33.1. Introduction
        • 33.2. Production of Different Types of Mushrooms
        • 33.3. Enrichment of Mushrooms with Selenium
        • 33.4. Potential Use of the Coffee Husk in Animal Feed after Fungal Colonization
        • 33.5. Conclusions/Summary Points
      • Chapter 34. Spent Coffee-Based Activated Carbons: Production, Properties, and Environmental Applications
        • 34.1. Introduction
        • 34.2. Preparation of Coffee-Based Activated Carbons and Their Surface Features
        • 34.3. Applications as Adsorbents from Gas and Vapor Phases
        • 34.4. Applications of Coffee-Derived Carbons as Adsorbents from Liquid Phase
        • 34.5. Applications of Coffee-Derived Carbons as Supercapacitors
        • 34.6. Summary Points
  • Section 2. Effects of Coffee Consumption
    • Part 2.1. Infection and Immunity
      • Chapter 35. Coffee Consumption and C-reactive Protein: Epidemiological Studies
        • 35.1. Introduction
        • 35.2. Epidemiological Evidence for the Relationship between Coffee and CRP
        • 35.3. Interpreting and Analyzing the Data on the Relationship between Coffee and CRP
        • 35.4. Conclusions
        • 35.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 36. Effects of Coffee on Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo and In Vitro
        • 36.1. Introduction
        • 36.2. Effects of Coffee Administration in a DO11.10 Allergic Mouse Model
        • 36.3. Change in Antigen-Specific Proliferation of Splenocytes Caused by Drinking Coffee
        • 36.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 37. Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Treatment and Coffee Drinking
        • 37.1. Factual Associations
        • 37.2. Coffee Drinking and Liver Lesions in Hepatitis C
        • 37.3. Coffee Drinking and Response to Treatment with Peginterferon and Ribavirin
        • 37.4. An Interventional Study of Coffee in Hepatitis C
        • 37.5. Conclusion
    • Part 2.2. Cancer
      • Chapter 38. Epidemiological Evidence on the Relation between Coffee Intake and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer
        • 38.1. Introduction
        • 38.2. Main Text
        • 38.3. Summary Points
      • Chapter 39. Coffee Consumption and Prostate Cancer
        • 39.1. Introduction
        • 39.2. Literature Search
        • 39.3. Epidemiological Evidence (Before 2000)
        • 39.4. Epidemiological Evidence (2001–Present)
        • 39.5. Limitations
        • 39.6. Conclusions and Future Perspectives
        • 39.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 40. Coffee Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk
        • 40.1. Introduction
        • 40.2. Coffee Consumption and Carcinogenesis
        • 40.3. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology
        • 40.4. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors
        • 40.5. Coffee Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Epidemiologic Studies
        • 40.6. Summary
        • 40.7. Summary Points
    • Part 2.3. Cardiovascular
      • Chapter 41. Coffee and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: An Overview of Epidemiologic Studies
        • 41.1. Introduction
        • 41.2. Coffee and CHD Risk
        • 41.3. Coffee and Stroke Risk
        • 41.4. Coffee and Heart Failure Risk
        • 41.5. Coffee and CVD Mortality
        • 41.6. Concluding Remarks
        • 41.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 42. Coffee Polyphenols and High Cardiovascular Risk Parameters
        • 42.1. Introduction
        • 42.2. Coffee: An Important Source of Polyphenols
        • 42.3. Bioavailability of Coffee Polyphenols
        • 42.4. In Vitro and Human Cell Studies
        • 42.5. Animal Studies
        • 42.6. Epidemiological Studies
        • 42.7. Clinical Trials
        • 42.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 43. Coffee and Hypertension: A Focus on Contrasting Acute and Chronic Effects and Nutrigenetics
        • 43.1. Introduction
        • 43.2. Acute Effects of Coffee on BLOOD PRESSURE
        • 43.3. Effects of Coffee on the Long-term Risk of Hypertension
        • 43.4. Nutrigenetics of Blood Pressure Responses to Coffee Drinking
        • 43.5. Conclusions
        • 43.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 44. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism
        • 44.1. Clinical Presentation
        • 44.2. Incidence and Complications
        • 44.3. Pathogenesis and Risk Factors
        • 44.4. Coffee Consumption and Risk of VTE
        • 44.5. Underlying Protective Mechanisms of Coffee on Risk of VTE
        • 44.6. Limitations of Findings on Behavioral Factors in Observational Studies
        • 44.7. Conclusions
        • 44.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 45. Coffee Consumption and Serum Lipids: A Review of Epidemiological Studies and Experimental Studies in Humans
        • 45.1. Introduction
        • 45.2. Epidemiological Studies on Coffee Consumption and Serum Lipids
        • 45.3. Experimental Studies on Coffee Consumption and Serum Lipids
        • 45.4. Boiled Coffee and Filter Coffee
        • 45.5. Caffeinated Coffee and Decaffeinated Coffee
        • 45.6. Conclusions
        • 45.7. Summary Points
    • Part 2.4. Nervous System and Behaviour
      • Chapter 46. Coffee and its Active Compounds are Neuroprotective
        • 46.1. Introduction
        • 46.2. Caffeine as a Neuroprotectant
        • 46.3. Decaffeinated Coffee Is Neuroprotective
        • 46.4. Neuroprotective Active Compounds in Coffee
        • 46.5. Antioxidative Activities of Phytochemicals in Coffee
        • 46.6. Anti-inflammatory Activities of Phytochemicals in Coffee
        • 46.7. Conclusion
        • 46.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 47. Coffee and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
        • 47.1. Introduction: The Disease
        • 47.2. Coffee and ALS: The Epidemiological Evidence
        • 47.3. Molecular Targets of Caffeine in the Central Nervous System
        • 47.4. Studies in Animal Models
        • 47.5. Electrophysiological Effects of Caffeine (Table 47.3)
        • 47.6. Caffeine and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders
        • 47.7. Effects of Other Constituents of Coffee (Table 47.4)
        • 47.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 48. Coffee, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF), and Neurodegenerative Diseases
        • 48.1. Background
        • 48.2. Coffee, Caffeine, and AD and Parkinson’s Disease
        • 48.3. Coffee and G-CSF
        • 48.4. The Mechanism of Coffee Benefit in Neurodegenerative Disease
        • 48.5. Conclusions
        • 48.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 49. Coffee-Induced Neural Tube Defects
        • 49.1. Introduction
        • 49.2. NTDs, Folic Acid, and Inositol
        • 49.3. Caffeine Intake and NTDs
        • 49.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 50. Coffee and Anxiety
        • 50.1. Introduction
        • 50.2. What Is Anxiety?
        • 50.3. Coffee and Normal Anxiety
        • 50.4. Coffee and Pathological Anxiety
        • 50.5. Conclusions
        • 50.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 51. Coffee-Related Insomnia
        • 51.1. Introduction
    • Part 2.5. Diabetes and Glucose Control
      • Chapter 52. Coffee Intake and Diabetes
        • 52.1. Introduction
        • 52.2. Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Studies of Coffee and Type 2 Diabetes
        • 52.3. Cross-sectional Studies of Coffee and Type 2 Diabetes
        • 52.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 53. The Influence of Acute Caffeine and Coffee Consumption on Glucose Homeostasis: Whole-Body and Tissue-Specific Effects and Mechanisms of Actions
        • 53.1. Introduction
        • 53.2. Acute Effects of Alkaloid Caffeine on Glucose Homeostasis
        • 53.3. Acute Effects of Caffeinated Coffee on Carbohydrate Homeostasis
        • 53.4. Considerations in Caffeine/Coffee-Induced Insulin Resistance
        • 53.5. Proposed Mechanisms of Action for Caffeine
        • 53.6. Conclusion
        • 53.7. Summary Points
    • Part 2.6. Metabolism and Other Organ Systems
      • Chapter 54. Coffee Consumption and Neglected Risk-Benefits on Health and Disease
        • 54.1. Introduction
        • 54.2. Surgical and Anesthesia-Related Conditions (Figure 54.1)
        • 54.3. Pregnancy, Fertility, and Sexual-Related Ailments (Figure 54.2)
        • 54.4. Menopause
        • 54.5. Childbearing and Infancy (Figure 54.2)
        • 54.6. Infectious Disease
        • 54.7. Respiratory Disease (Asthma and COPD)
        • 54.8. Dentistry
        • 54.9. Occupational Disease
        • 54.10. Conclusions
        • 54.11. Summary Points
      • Chapter 55. Coffee Consumption and Body Weight Regulation
        • 55.1. Introduction
        • 55.2. Epidemiological Evidence Linking Coffee Consumption and Weight Status
        • 55.3. Impact of Coffee and Caffeine on EE
        • 55.4. Effects of Coffee Consumption on Appetite Regulation
        • 55.5. Effects of Coffee Consumption in Weight Loss
        • 55.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 56. Coffee Consumption and Adiponectin: An Overview of Epidemiological Studies
        • 56.1. Introduction
        • 56.2. Adiponectin
        • 56.3. Published Epidemiological Studies on Association between Coffee Consumption and Adiponectin Level
        • 56.4. Potential Mechanisms that Increase the Levels of Adiponectin
        • 56.5. Which Coffee Components Play an Important Role on Increasing Adiponectin Levels?
        • 56.6. Discussion
        • 56.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 57. Effect of Coffee Consumption on Oral Health
        • 57.1. Introduction
        • 57.2. Review of Literature
        • 57.3. Summary and Conclusions
        • 57.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 58. Role of Coffea arabica Extract and Related Compounds in Preventing Photoaging and Photodamage of the Skin
        • 58.1. Introduction
        • 58.2. Aging and Photoaging
        • 58.3. Mechanisms of Photoaging
        • 58.4. Antioxidant Activity of Coffee
        • 58.5. Coffee Prevents Skin Photoaging
        • 58.6. Coffee Prevents Skin Tumor Formation
        • 58.7. Effect of Coffee Constituents on Photoaging and Photocarcinogenesis
        • 58.8. Conclusion
        • 58.9. Summary points
      • Chapter 59. Coffee and Renal Function and Disease
        • 59.1. Introduction
        • 59.2. Conclusion
      • Chapter 60. Coffee and Gastrointestinal Glucuronosyltransferases
        • 60.1. Introduction
        • 60.2. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases
        • 60.3. Glucuronidation of Hydroxycinnamic Acids
        • 60.4. Coffee-Mediated UGT1A Regulation in Cell Culture
        • 60.5. Coffee-Mediated UGT1A Activation in Mouse Models
        • 60.6. Contribution of UGTs to the Coffee-Mediated Protective Effects on the Metabolism and Genotoxicity of the Dietary Carcinogen PhIP
        • 60.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 61. Effects of Coffee on Estrogen Sulfation in Human Colon Carcinoma Caco-2 Cells
        • 61.1. Introduction
        • 61.2. Coffee Inhibits Sulfation of Estradiol in Caco-2 Cells
        • 61.3. Characterization of the Inhibitory Activity in Coffee toward E2 Sulfation in Caco-2 Cells
        • 61.4. Effects of Coffee on the Expression of SULT1E1
        • 61.5. Effects of Coffee on STS and BCRP
        • 61.6. Characterization of the Active Constituents That Regulate the Expression of the Estrogen Sulfation-Related Genes SULT1E1, STS, and BCRP
        • 61.7. Conclusion
        • 61.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 62. Coffee and the Liver: An Overview of Epidemiologic Studies
        • 62.1. Summary Points
        • 62.2. The Limits of Epidemiological Studies
        • 62.3. Coffee and Liver Enzymes
        • 62.4. Coffee, Cirrhosis, and Liver Fibrosis (Table 62.1)
        • 62.5. Coffee, NAFLD, and NASH
        • 62.6. Coffee and Hepatocellular Carcinoma
        • 62.7. Putative Mechanisms of Action of Coffee on the Liver
        • 62.8. Conclusions
      • Chapter 63. Organic and Conventional Arabica Coffee L: Protective Effects on Liver Under Pre-neoplastic Conditions
        • 63.1. Introduction
        • 63.2. Differentiation in Coffee Production System
        • 63.3. Coffee Compounds
        • 63.4. Liver Neoplasia
        • 63.5. Coffee: Bioprotector Effect in Liver Neoplasia
        • 63.6. Conclusion
        • 63.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 64. Coffee and Prevention of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
        • 64.1. Introduction
        • 64.2. Coffee and NAFLD
        • 64.3. Summary Points
      • Chapter 65. Estimate of Acrylamide Intake from Coffee and Health Risk Assessment
        • 65.1. Introduction
        • 65.2. Toxicological Aspects of Acrylamide
        • 65.3. Exposure Assessment to Acrylamide from Coffee
        • 65.4. Health Risk Assessment
        • 65.5. Cancer Evidence from Epidemiological Studies
        • 65.6. Considerations about Risk Management Actions
        • 65.7. Conclusions
        • 65.8. Summary Points
    • Part 2.7. Cellular and Molecular Biology
      • Chapter 66. Protective Effects of Coffee Against Induction of DNA Damage and Cancer by Aflatoxin B1
        • 66.1. Introduction
        • 66.2. Occurrence of Aflatoxins in Foods and Human Cancer Risks Caused by Consumption of Contaminated Foods
        • 66.3. Metabolism and Detoxification of AFB1
        • 66.4. Prevention of DNA Damage and Inhibition of Preneoplastic Lesions
        • 66.5. Prevention of DNA Damage by Different Constituents of Coffee
        • 66.6. Molecular Mechanisms
        • 66.7. Does Coffee Protect Humans against Aflatoxin B1?
        • 66.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 67. Instant Coffee and Protection against DNA Damage
        • 67.1. Introduction
        • 67.2. Coffee Consumption and Cancer
        • 67.3. 8-Oxoguanine
        • 67.4. 8-Oxoguanine Repair System
        • 67.5. Instant Coffee Consumption and 8-Oxoguanine Generation and Repair
        • 67.6. Conclusions
        • 67.7. Summary Points
  • Section 3. Effects of Specific Compounds Found in Coffee
    • Part 3.1. Infection and Immunity
      • Chapter 68. Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Activity of Chlorogenic Acid and Its Related Compounds
        • 68.1. Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Activity of Chlorogenic Acid and Its Related Compounds
        • 68.2. Chlorogenic Acid Possesses Potent Anti-HBV Activity
        • 68.3. Anti-HBV Activity of Chlorogenic Acid-Related Compounds
        • 68.4. Hybrids of Caudatin and Chlorogenic Acid
        • 68.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 69. Coffea canephora: A Promising Natural Anticariogenic Product
        • 69.1. Introduction
        • 69.2. Coffea canephora
        • 69.3. Dental Caries Pathogenesis and the Protective Role of Coffee: A Focus on C. canephora Species
        • 69.4. Conclusions
        • 69.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 70. Kahweol, a Coffee Diterpene with Anti-inflammatory Properties
        • 70.1. Introduction
        • 70.2. Kahweol Modulates Nitric Oxide Synthesis
        • 70.3. Kahweol Modulates Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression
        • 70.4. Kahweol Modulates Cell Adhesion
        • 70.5. Kahweol Protects against Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage
        • 70.6. Kahweol Targets NF-κB/STAT-1–Mediated Inflammatory Responses
        • 70.7. Kahweol Targets MCP-1 Secretion in Endothelial Cells
        • 70.8. Kahweol Behaves as an Anti-Angiogenic Agent
        • 70.9. Concluding Remarks
        • 70.10. Summary Points
      • Chapter 71. Antifungal Inhibitory Activities of Caffeic and Quinic Acid Derivatives
        • 71.1. Introduction
        • 71.2. Caffeoylquinic, Caffeic, and Quinic Acid Derivatives with Antifungal Activity
        • 71.3. Summary Points
    • Part 3.2. Cancer
      • Chapter 72. On the Linkage between Caffeine, Cytokine Secretion, and Cancer
        • 72.1. Introduction
        • 72.2. Caffeine, Cytokine Secretion, and Cancer
        • 72.3. Summary Points
      • Chapter 73. Anticancer Effect of Caffeic Acid on Human Cervical Cancer Cells
        • 73.1. Introduction
        • 73.2. Caffeic Acid on Cancer Cell Proliferation
        • 73.3. Caffeic Acid on Intracellular ROS Level, Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, and Apoptosis
        • 73.4. Changes in the Levels of Lipid Peroxidative and the Activities of Enzymatic Antioxidants
      • Chapter 74. Caffeic and Ferulic Acid Derivatives: Use in Breast Cancer
        • 74.1. Introduction: Coffee Consumption and Breast Cancer
        • 74.2. Caffeic and Ferulic Acid Antibreast Cancer Activity
        • 74.3. Summary Points
      • Chapter 75. Molecular Targets of Coffee Phytochemicals Caffeic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid in Chemoprevention
        • 75.1. Introduction
        • 75.2. Antioxidant Activity of Coffee and Its Components
        • 75.3. Strategies for Identifying Molecular Targets of Coffee Components
        • 75.4. Summary Points
    • Part 3.3. Cardiovascular
      • Chapter 76. Caffeine and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
        • 76.1. Introduction
        • 76.2. Coronary Artery Disease
        • 76.3. TIMI Risk Score
        • 76.4. Myocardial Ischemia
        • 76.5. Principle of Cardiac Stress Testing
        • 76.6. Types of Cardiac Stress Tests
        • 76.7. Sensitivity/Specificity of Cardiac Stress Testing
        • 76.8. Effects of Caffeine on Stress Testing
        • 76.9. Current Guidelines Regarding Caffeine and Stress Testing
        • 76.10. Topics to Consider and Future Investigations
        • 76.11. Summary Points
      • Chapter 77. Caffeine and Atrial Fibrillation
        • 77.1. Introduction
        • 77.2. Pathophysiological Link between Caffeine and Arrhythmias
        • 77.3. Human Studies
        • 77.4. Energy Drinks and Caffeine
        • 77.5. Conclusions
        • 77.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 78. Caffeine Cardiovascular Toxicity: Too Much of a Good Thing
        • 78.1. Introduction
        • 78.2. Caffeine and the Heart
        • 78.3. Summary Points
      • Chapter 79. Potential Effects of Chlorogenic Acids on Platelet Activation
        • 79.1. Introduction
        • 79.2. Coffee and Its Chemicals
        • 79.3. Chemical Properties, Absorption, and Metabolism of CHAs
        • 79.4. Bioavailability of Chlorogenic Acids
        • 79.5. Cardiovascular Disease and Chlorogenic Acids
        • 79.6. Effects of Chlorogenic Acids on ROS
        • 79.7. Effects of Chlorogenic Acids on COX-I and II Enzymes
        • 79.8. Effects of Chlorogenic Acids on P-Selectin
        • 79.9. Conclusion
    • Part 3.4. Nervous System and Behaviour
      • Chapter 80. Use of Caffeine for Cognitive Enhancement
        • 80.1. Introduction
        • 80.2. Mechanism of Action
        • 80.3. Cognitive-Enhancing Effects and Side Effects of Caffeine
        • 80.4. Epidemiology of the Use of Caffeine for CE
        • 80.5. Conclusions
        • 80.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 81. Caffeolyquinic Acid Protects against Alzheimer’s Disease through Inhibition of Amyloid Beta-Induced Toxicity
        • 81.1. Introduction
        • 81.2. Caffeolyquinic Acid
        • 81.3. Amyloid β
        • 81.4. Neuroprotective Effect of CQA
        • 81.5. Protective Effect on the Aggregation of Aβ
        • 81.6. Conclusion
        • 81.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 82. Neuroactive β-Carbolines Norharman and Harman in Coffee
        • 82.1. Introduction
        • 82.2. Norharman and Harman: The Molecules
        • 82.3. Norharman and Harman Health Impact
        • 82.4. Norharman and Harman in Coffee
        • 82.5. Summary Points
    • Part 3.5. Diabetes and Glucose Control
      • Chapter 83. Caffeine, Insulin Resistance, and Hypertension
        • 83.1. Caffeine and the Metabolic Syndrome
        • 83.2. Caffeine―Pharmacology and Mechanisms of Action
        • 83.3. Effect of Caffeine on Insulin Action
        • 83.4. Caffeine and Hypertension
        • 83.5. Chronic Caffeine Administration in the Prevention and Reversion of Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Hypertension
        • 83.6. The Carotid Body as a Pharmacological Target for Caffeine
        • 83.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 84. Inhibition of Porcine Pancreas α-Amylase by Chlorogenic Acids from Green Coffee Beans and Cinnamic Acid Derivatives: A Focus on Kinetic
        • 84.1. Introduction
        • 84.2. PPA Inhibitory Effects of 5-CQA, CA, and QA
        • 84.3. PPA Inhibition by Eight Types of CGAs and Cinnamate Derivatives
        • 84.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 85. Antidiabetic Effects of Trigonelline: Comparison with Nicotinic Acid
        • 85.1. Introduction
        • 85.2. The Effects of TRG and NA on T2DM Using Goto-Kakizaki Rats as a Nonobese Animal Model
        • 85.3. How Does TRG Ameliorates Oxidative Stress in GK Rats?
        • 85.4. The Antidiabetic Effect of TRG and NA on T2DM Using KK-Ay Mice as an Obese Animal Model
        • 85.5. Summary
        • 85.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 86. Chlorogenic Acid in Whole Body and Tissue-Specific Glucose Regulation
        • 86.1. Introduction
        • 86.2. Chlorogenic Acid
        • 86.3. Content in Coffee
        • 86.4. Chlorogenic Acid Absorption
        • 86.5. CGA in Blood Glucose Management
        • 86.6. Summary Points
    • Part 3.6. Metabolism and Other Organ Systems
      • Chapter 87. Bioavailability and Metabolism of Chlorogenic Acids from Coffee
        • 87.1. Introduction
        • 87.2. CGA Content in Green Coffee
        • 87.3. CGA in Ground Roasted and Brewed Coffees and Human Daily Intake
        • 87.4. Bioavailability and Metabolism of CGA from Coffee
        • 87.5. Interaction between CGA and Other Food Components
        • 87.6. Concluding Remarks
        • 87.7. Summary Points
      • Chapter 88. Inhibitory Effects of Caffeic Acid on Free-Radical Formation
        • 88.1. Introduction
        • 88.2. Summary Points
      • Chapter 89. Effects of Caffeic, Ferulic, and p-Coumaric Acids on Lipid Membranes
        • 89.1. Introduction
        • 89.2. Interactions of Hydroxycinnamic Acids with Model Lipid Membranes
        • 89.3. Effects of Phenolic Acids on the Rigidity of Model Membranes in the Liquid-Disordered State
        • 89.4. Effects of Phenolic Acids on the Rigidity of Model Membranes in the Gel Crystalline State
        • 89.5. Correlation between Phenolic-Acid Polarity and Influence on the Properties of Model Lipid Membranes
        • 89.6. Caco-2 Cell Permeation
        • 89.7. Transcellular Permeability Model
        • 89.8. Facilitated Mechanisms of Transport of Phenolic Acids through the Colon Epithelium
        • 89.9. Interactions of p-Coumaric Acid with Lysosomes
        • 89.10. The Blood–Brain Barrier
        • 89.11. Summary Points
      • Chapter 90. Pharmacology of Caffeine: The Main Active Compound of Coffee
        • 90.1. Introduction
        • 90.2. Pharmacokinetics of Caffeine
        • 90.3. Pharmacodynamics of Caffeine
        • 90.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 91. Adenosine Receptors as the Biochemical Target for Low Doses of Caffeine
        • 91.1. Introduction
        • 91.2. Caffeine Levels and Antagonism of Adenosine Receptors
        • 91.3. Adenosine Levels and Activation of Adenosine Receptors
        • 91.4. Validation of Adenosine Receptors as a Major Caffeine Target
        • 91.5. Summary Points
      • Chapter 92. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeine: A Focus on Human Red Blood Cells and Correlations with Several Neurodegenerative Disorders
        • 92.1. Introduction
        • 92.2. Oxygen and Its Toxicity
        • 92.3. Antioxidant Effects of Caffeine
        • 92.4. Summary Points
      • Chapter 93. Antioxidant Properties of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Derivatives: A Focus on Biochemistry, Physicochemical Parameters, Reactive Species, and Biomolecular Interactions
        • 93.1. Introduction
        • 93.2. Efficiency of HCs to Scavenge Reactive Nitrogen or Oxygen Species
        • 93.3. Effect of HCs on the Oxidation of Biomolecules
        • 93.4. Summary POINTS
      • Chapter 94. Biological Effects of Coffee Melanoidins
        • 94.1. Introduction
        • 94.2. Role of Coffee Melanoidins as Modulators of the Gut Microbiota
        • 94.3. Coffee Melanoidins as Antimicrobial Agents
        • 94.4. The Antioxidant Activity of Coffee Melanoidins
        • 94.5. The Chelating Activity of Coffee Melanoidins
        • 94.6. Coffee Melanoidins as Enzymes Modulators
        • 94.7. Final Remarks
        • 94.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 95. Melanoidins from Coffee and Lipid Peroxidation
        • 95.1. Introduction
        • 95.2. Lipid Peroxidation and Diseases
        • 95.3. Sources of Dietary Lipid Oxidation Products and ALES
        • 95.4. Coffee Melanoidins: Structure and Biological Activity
        • 95.5. Coffee Melanoidins As Radical Scavengers, Metal Chelators, and Lipid Peroxidation Inhibitors
        • 95.6. Coffee Melanoidins Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation during Simulated Digestion of Meat
        • 95.7. In vivo Evidence of Coffee Melanoidins As Inhibitors of Lipid Peroxidation
        • 95.8. Conclusion
        • 95.9. Summary Points
      • Chapter 96. Coffee and Bone Metabolism: Kahweol and Osteoclastogenesis
        • 96.1. Introduction
        • 96.2. Kahweol Suppresses OCL Differentiation but Not Cell Viability
        • 96.3. Kahweol Has Inhibitory Effects on Intracellular Signaling in OCLs
        • 96.4. Kahweol Inhibits the Expression of OCL-Marker Proteins
        • 96.5. Kahweol Induces mRNA Expression of Phase II Antioxidative Enzymes in OCLs
        • 96.6. Kahweol Enhances HO-1 Protein Expression and Inhibits High Mobility Group Box 1 Release
        • 96.7. Conclusion and Perspective
        • 96.8. Summary Points
      • Chapter 97. The Chemistry of Coffee Furans and Hydroxycinnamates under Simulated Gastric Conditions: Implications for Bioactivity and Bioavailability
        • 97.1. Modeling Gastric Conditions
        • 97.2. The Acid-Mediated Chemistry of Nitrite in the Stomach
        • 97.3. The Role of Thiocyanate and Other Saliva Ingredients
        • 97.4. Reactivity of Hydroxycinnamic Acids and Their Esters Toward Acidic Nitrite
        • 97.5. Purification and Differential Reaction Behavior of the Furan Diterpenes Cafestol and Kahweol Toward Nitrosating Agents
        • 97.6. Implications for the Bioactivity and Bioavailability
        • 97.7. Toxicological Implications of the Nitrite-Modified Molecules
        • 97.8. Conclusions and Perspectives
        • 97.9. Summary Points
      • Chapter 98. Furan in Coffee Products: A Probabilistic Exposure Estimation
        • 98.1. Introduction
        • 98.2. Content of Furan in Coffee
        • 98.3. Exposure Estimation
        • 98.4. Risk Assessment of Furan in Coffee Products
        • 98.5. Summary Points
    • Part 3.7. Cellular and Molecular Biology
      • Chapter 99. Caffeolyquinic Acid Induces the Upregulation of Glycolytic Enzymes
        • 99.1. Introduction
        • 99.2. The Glycolytic and Nonglycolytic Functions of Glycolysis Enzymes
        • 99.3. Relationship Between Glycolytic Enzymes and Alzheimer’s Disease
        • 99.4. Metabolomics
        • 99.5. Conclusion
        • 99.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 100. Caffeic Acid and Organic Anion Transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3
        • 100.1. Introduction
        • 100.2. Renal Tubular Secretion of Drugs by OATs
        • 100.3. Methotrexate–NSAID Interaction, as an Example of a Drug–Drug Interaction at OAT1 and OAT3
        • 100.4. Inhibitory Effects of Caffeic Acid on Drug Transport by hOAT1 and hOAT3
        • 100.5. Discussion of Interaction between Coffee and Substrates of hOAT1 and/or hOAT3
        • 100.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 101. The Cytoprotective Effects of Hydroxycinnamic Acid are Mediated by Its Antioxidant Activity
        • 101.1. Introduction
        • 101.2. Antioxidant Activity of HCAS
        • 101.3. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of HCAS
        • 101.4. Anti-Apoptotic Effects of HCAS
        • 101.5. Metabolism of HCAS in Coffee
        • 101.6. Summary Points
      • Chapter 102. Cytoprotective Effect of Coffee Melanoidins
        • 102.1. Introduction
        • 102.2. A Cell Culture Model for the Assessment of the Chemopreventive Potential of Dietary Compounds
        • 102.3. Coffee Melanoidins Protect HepG2 Cells against Oxidative Stress Induced by t-BOOH
        • 102.4. Conclusion
        • 102.5. Summary Points
  • Section 4. Analysis and Methods
    • Chapter 103. Use of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for Coffee Beans Quality Assessment
      • 103.1. Introduction
      • 103.2. Summary Points
    • Chapter 104. Spectroscopic Methods for Chemometric Identification of Defective and Nondefective Coffees
      • 104.1. Introduction
      • 104.2. Brief Overview of Spectroscopic Methods
      • 104.3. Brief Overview of Chemometrics
      • 104.4. Spectroscopic Methods in Green Coffee Analysis
      • 104.5. Spectroscopic Methods in Roasted Coffee Analysis
      • 104.6. Concluding Remarks
      • 104.7. Summary Points
    • Chapter 105. Overview of Currently Applied Techniques for Detection of Adulterants in Coffee and Potential Use of DNA-Based Methods as Promising New Analytical Tools
      • 105.1. Introduction
      • 105.2. Microscopic Methods
      • 105.3. Spectroscopic Methods
      • 105.4. Chromatographic Methods
      • 105.5. DNA-Based Methods
      • 105.6. Final Considerations
      • 105.7. Summary Points
    • Chapter 106. Assay of Total Antioxidant Capacity of Coffee: Use of a DNA-Based Biosensor
      • 106.1. Introduction
      • 106.2. Sensors for the TAC Evaluation of Coffee Samples
      • 106.3. DNA-Based Biosensors for TAC Assessment
      • 106.4. Conclusions
      • 106.5. Summary Points
    • Chapter 107. Determination of Polyphenols and Major Purine Alkaloids in Coffee: An Overview
      • 107.1. Introduction
      • 107.2. Analytical Methods
      • 107.3. Chromatographic Techniques
      • 107.4. Other Techniques
      • 107.5. Conclusions
      • 107.6. Summary Points
    • Chapter 108. Determination of Caffeine in Coffee Using Low-Pressure Chromatography
      • 108.1. Introduction
      • 108.2. Analytical Methods for Determining Caffeine in Coffee
      • 108.3. Determining Caffeine in Coffee Using a Low-Pressure Chromatographic Flow Injection System
      • 108.4. Summary Points
    • Chapter 109. Assay of Kahweol and Cafestol in Coffee
      • 109.1. Introduction
      • 109.2. Sample Preparation and Extraction Methods
      • 109.3. Separation, Identification, and Quantification of Diterpenes
      • 109.4. Occurrence of Kahweol and Cafestol in Different Coffea Matrices
      • 109.5. Summary Points
    • Chapter 110. Analysis of Furan in Coffee
      • 110.1. Introduction
      • 110.2. Analysis of Furan in Food
      • 110.3. Furan in Coffee
      • 110.4. Summary Points
    • Chapter 111. Analysis of Acrylamide in Coffee
      • 111.1. Introduction
      • 111.2. Methods of Analysis for Acrylamide
      • 111.3. Occurence of Acrylamide in Coffee
      • 111.4. Summary Points
    • Chapter 112. Analysis of the Mycotoxin Ochratoxin A in Coffee
      • 112.1. Introduction
      • 112.2. Ochratoxin A
      • 112.3. Sampling and Sample Preparation
      • 112.4. Extraction
      • 112.5. Clean-up
      • 112.6. Detection and Quantification
      • 112.7. Confirmation
      • 112.8. Summary Points
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
1080
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780124167162
Hardcover ISBN:
9780124095175

About the Editor

Victor Preedy

Victor R. Preedy BSc, PhD, DSc, FRSB, FRSPH, FRCPath, FRSC is a senior member of King's College London. He is also Director of the Genomics Centre and a member of the Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine.

Professor Preedy has longstanding academic interests in substance misuse especially in relation to health and well being. He is a member of the Editorial Board of Drug and Alcohol Dependence and a founding member of the Editorial Board of Addiction Biology. In his career Professor Preedy was Reader at the Addictive Behaviour Centre at The University of Roehampton, and also Reader at the School of Pharmacy (now part of University College London; UCL). Professor Preedy is Editor of the influential works The Handbook Of Alcohol Related Pathology, The Neuropathology of Drug Addictions and Substance Misuse and The Handbook of Cannabis and Related Pathologies (all published by Academic Press-Elsevier).

Professor Preedy graduated in 1974 with an Honours Degree in Biology and Physiology with Pharmacology. He gained his University of London PhD in 1981. In 1992, he received his Membership of the Royal College of Pathologists and in 1993 he gained his second doctoral degree (DSc). Professor Preedy was elected as a Fellow of the Institute of Biology in 1995 and also as a Fellow to the Royal College of Pathologists in 2000. He was then elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health (2004) and The Royal Institute of Public Health and Hygiene (2004). In 2009, Professor Preedy became a Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health and in 2012 a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

To his credit, Professor Preedy has published over 600 articles, which includes peer-reviewed manuscripts based on original research, abstracts and symposium presentations, reviews and numerous books and volumes.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Dietetics, King's College London, UK