Clinical Applications of Noncoding RNAs in Cancer

Clinical Applications of Noncoding RNAs in Cancer

1st Edition - January 19, 2022

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  • Editors: Subash Gupta, Kishore Challagundla
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128245514
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128245507

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Description

Clinical Applications of Noncoding RNAs in Cancer summarizes the existing strategies, advances, and future opportunities on the role of noncoding RNAs in cancer patients. Established clinicians and researchers from all around the world share their views and expertise and provide readers with invaluable knowledge on the subject. This book provides a comprehensive collection of information on the utility of noncoding RNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of cancer. It also discusses the evolutionary significance of noncoding RNAs and how the molecular tools such as RNA-seq, RNA-FISH, ic-SHAPE, and quantitative real-time PCR help in the detection and elucidation of the functions of noncoding RNAs. Additionally, the challenges associated with noncoding RNA approaches and future developments are discussed. It is a valuable resource for cancer researchers, oncologists, clinicians, and other biomedical field members who want to learn more about noninvasive ways to diagnose and efficiently treat diverse cancer types.

Key Features

  • Presents a beginning chapter summary to help readers understand the content thoroughly
  • Encompasses detailed description of information from clinical studies on noncoding RNAs in cancer therapy
  • Discusses one cancer type per chapter making the content easy to reference

Readership

Cancer researchers, oncologists, clinicians, medical scientists

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Noncoding ribonucleic acid for pancreatic cancer therapy
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing noncoding RNAs in pancreatic cancer patients
  • 1.3 Bioinformatics for analyzing noncoding RNAs in pancreatic cancer patients
  • 1.4 Noncoding RNA
  • 1.5 Pancreatic cancer–specific microRNAs
  • 1.6 Pancreatic cancer–associated lncRNAs
  • 1.7 Pancreatic cancer–associated circular RNAs
  • 1.8 Diagnostic microRNA markers of PDAC
  • 1.9 Diagnostic lncRNA markers of PDAC
  • 1.10 Diagnostic circular RNA markers of PDAC
  • 1.11 Summary and conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Applications of noncoding RNAs in brain cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Data sets for noncoding RNAs analysis
  • 2.3 Expression of noncoding RNAs in brain cancer patients
  • 2.4 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing noncoding RNAs in brain cancer patients
  • 2.5 Noncoding RNAs as predictive marker for brain cancer patients
  • 2.6 Potential of noncoding RNAs in predicting chemoresistance and radioresistance in brain cancer patients
  • 2.7 Therapeutic potential and targeting of ncRNAs in brain cancer patients—challenges and perspectives
  • 2.8 Summary and conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Noncoding RNAs in patients with colorectal cancer
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.3 Microarray
  • 3.4 Serial analysis of gene expression
  • 3.5 Cap analysis gene expression
  • 3.6 RNA sequencing
  • 3.7 Dataset and bioinformatics for analyzing noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.8 Expression of noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.9 Sample types used for analyzing noncoding RNAs
  • 3.10 Cell signaling pathways modulated by noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.11 Several other mechanisms
  • 3.12 Clinical applications of noncoding RNAs as biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer
  • 3.13 Diagnostic potential of noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.14 Prognostic potential of noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.15 Therapeutic potential of noncoding RNAs in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.16 Potential of noncoding RNAs in predicting chemoresistance and radioresistance in colorectal cancer patients
  • 3.17 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Applications of noncoding ribonucleic acids in multiple myeloma patients
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Samples and experimental methods for the analysis of noncoding RNAs in multiple myeloma patients
  • 4.3 Datasets analyzing noncoding RNAs in multiple myeloma patients
  • 4.4 Noncoding RNAs implicated in the etiology of multiple myeloma
  • 4.5 Cell signaling pathways modulated by noncoding RNAs in multiple myeloma
  • 4.6 Noncoding RNAs affecting interactions with the bone marrow niche
  • 4.7 Noncoding RNAs as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in multiple myeloma
  • 4.8 Therapeutic potential of noncoding RNAs in multiple myeloma patients
  • 4.9 Summary and conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Clinical applications of noncoding RNAs in lung cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.3 Datasets and informatics for analyzing ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.4 Expression of ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.5 Sample types used for analyzing ncRNAs
  • 5.6 Cell signaling pathways modulated by ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.7 NcRNAs as predictive markers for lung cancer patients
  • 5.8 Diagnostic potential of ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.9 Prognostic potential of ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.10 Therapeutic potential of ncRNAs in lung cancer patients
  • 5.11 Potential of ncRNAs in predicting chemoresistance and radioresistance in lung cancer patients
  • 5.12 Summary and conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Noncoding RNAs in intraocular tumor patients
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Retinoblastoma
  • 6.3 Uveal melanoma
  • 6.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Applications of noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Datasets and informatics for analyzing noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • 7.3 Expression of noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • 7.4 Cell signaling pathways modulated by noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • 7.5 Diagnostic potential of noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • 7.6 Prognostic potential of noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • 7.7 Therapeutic potential of noncoding RNAs in renal cancer patients
  • 7.8 Potential of noncoding RNAs in predicting chemoresistance and radioresistance in renal cancer patients
  • 7.9 Summary and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Clinical significance of long noncoding RNAs in breast cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Potential of lncRNAs in the diagnosis of breast cancer
  • 8.3 Potential of lncRNAs in the prognosis of breast cancer
  • 8.4 Potential of lncRNAs in breast cancer therapy
  • 8.5 Potential of lncRNAs in predicting breast cancer patient’s response to therapeutics
  • 8.6 Potential of lncRNAs in predicting chemoresistance and radioresistance in breast cancer patients
  • 8.7 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing noncoding RNAs in cancer patients
  • 8.8 Summary and conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Noncoding ribonucleic acids in gastric cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer patients
  • 9.3 Expression of noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer patients
  • 9.4 Sample types used for analyzing noncoding RNAs (tumor biopsies, liquid biopsies, etc.)
  • 9.5 Cell signaling pathways modulated by noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer patients
  • 9.6 Noncoding RNAs as prognostic and predictive marker for gastric cancer patients
  • 9.7 Diagnostic value of small noncoding RNAs in gastric cancer
  • 9.8 Potential of noncoding RNAs in predicting chemotherapy resistance and radiotherapy resistance in gastric cancer patients
  • 9.9 Summary and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Experimental methods and tools for analyzing ncRNAs in prostate cancer patients
  • 10.3 Datasets and informatics for analyzing noncoding RNAs
  • 10.4 Sample types used for analyzing ncRNAs (tumor biopsies, liquid biopsies, etc.)
  • 10.5 Cell signaling pathways modulated by ncRNAs in prostate cancer
  • 10.6 NcRNAs as biomarkers for prostate cancer
  • 10.7 Therapeutic potential of ncRNAs in prostate cancer patients
  • 10.8 Potential of ncRNAs in predicting chemo-resistance and radioresistance in prostate cancer patients
  • 10.9 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Noncoding RNAs in liver cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 NcRNA roles in liver development and functions
  • 11.3 Noncoding RNA detection
  • 11.4 Expression of ncRNAs in liver cancers
  • 11.5 Noncoding RNA relevance in liver cancer diagnosis and prognosis
  • 11.6 Summary and conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Noncoding ribonucleic acids in gallbladder cancer patients
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 MiRNAs in gallbladder carcinoma
  • 12.3 LncRNAs in gallbladder carcinoma
  • 12.4 PiRNAs in gallbladder carcinoma
  • 12.5 Limitations of clinical utility of ncRNAs in gallbladder carcinoma
  • 12.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Clinical implications of noncoding RNAs in neuroblastoma patients
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Types of noncoding RNAs
  • 13.3 Role of noncoding RNAs in neuroblastoma growth and development
  • 13.4 Clinical significance of noncoding RNAs in neuroblastoma
  • 13.5 Therapeutic implications and targeting strategies for noncoding RNAs in neuroblastoma
  • 13.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Potential clinical application of lncRNAs in pediatric cancer
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Experimental and bioinformatics tools for studying lncRNAs
  • 14.3 LncRNAs in pediatric cancer
  • 14.4 Conclusion and perspectives
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 478
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: January 19, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128245514
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128245507

About the Editors

Subash Gupta

Subash Gupta
Dr. Subash Chandra Gupta is an additional professor and Head at the Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Guwahati, India. He is currently on lien from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. Dr. Gupta did his postdoctoral training from the Ohio State University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in the United States. Before joining the Banaras Hindu University, Dr. Gupta was an instructor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in the United States. His current research is focused on uncovering the mechanism by which acidic microenvironment promote cancer growth. He is also working on cancer chemoprevention and on projects to elucidate the role of inflammatory pathways, cancer stem cells, exosomal microRNAs, and long noncoding RNAs in regulating tumor development. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles in highly prestigious journals. He has been honored with prestigious national and international awards. He has coedited special issues of scientific journals and three prestigious books. Currently he is an editorial board member on several scientific journals and an active reviewer on more than 80 journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Additional Professor and Head, Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Guwahati, India

Kishore Challagundla

Kishore Challagundla
Dr. Kishore B. Challagundla is an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the Children’s Health Research Institute, and a member of the NCI-designated Fred & Pamela Buffet Cancer Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE, United States. Dr. Challagundla earned a master’s in Biochemistry from Bharathidasan University and a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Lucknow, followed by postdoctoral training at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, and Children's Hospital Los Angeles in California. Challagundla 's lab research focuses on investigating the involvement of novel noncoding RNAs in therapy resistance, the role of exosomes in the cross-talk between tumor, microenvironment, and immune cells, the posttranslational modifications of immune checkpoint molecules by ubiquitination, and their potential role in escaping immune surveillance, the development of RNA-based diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy response predictive specific noninvasive biomarkers in body fluids, and the development of novel combination therapeutic strategies that maximize drug response without any toxicity in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Dr. Challagundla served as the principal investigator of several grants, including NIH, foundation, and institutional grants. Dr. Challagundla is an ad hoc reviewer to various national and international organizations such as NIH, Yorkshire Cancer Research (UK), University Grants Committee (Hong Kong), Dutch Cancer Society (The Netherlands), The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (The Netherlands), Worldwide Cancer Research, The Indonesian Science Fund, The National Science Centre (Poland), The French National Cancer Institute (France), The Israel Science Foundation (Israel), Czech Science Foundation (Czech Republic), and The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Furthermore, Challagundla is an associate editor of various journals such as Molecular Therapy Nucleic Acids (Cell Press), Molecular Therapy Oncolytics (Cell press), PLoS One, BMC Molecular & Cellular Biology, Cancer Cell International, and an editorial board member of Cancers, The Journal of Extracellular Vesicles, and an active reviewer for more than 100 top international journals. Challagundla has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles in high-impact journals, written several book chapters, and is a recipient of various national and international awards.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fred and Pamela Buffet Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA

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