Cereal Grains - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780081007198, 9780081007303

Cereal Grains

2nd Edition

Assessing and Managing Quality

Editors: Colin Wrigley Ian Batey Diane Miskelly
eBook ISBN: 9780081007303
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081007198
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 12th January 2017
Page Count: 830
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Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Part I: Cereal-Grain Quality
    • Chapter 1: Assessing and Managing Quality at all Stages of the Grain Chain
      • Abstract
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. The creation of products from the cereal grains
      • 1.3. Grain quality
      • 1.4. The grain chain
      • 1.5. The assessment of grain quality
      • 1.6. The management of grain quality
      • 1.7. Future trends
    • Chapter 2: The Cereal Grains: Providing our Food, Feed and Fuel Needs
      • Abstract
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Cereal grains and people
      • 2.3. The agricultural grains
      • 2.4. The dicot agricultural grains
      • 2.5. The monocot agricultural grains
      • 2.6. Future trends
    • Chapter 3: The Diversity of Uses for Cereal Grains
      • Abstract
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Food
      • 3.3. Feed
      • 3.4. Industrial uses
      • 3.5. Utilisation of individual cereals
      • 3.6. Grain substitution
      • 3.7. Whole-plant utilisation
      • 3.8. Future trends
    • Chapter 4: Cereal-Grain Morphology and Composition
      • Abstract
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. The study of plant, head and grain morphology
      • 4.3. The cereal flower and pollination
      • 4.4. Plant morphology
      • 4.5. Head morphology
      • 4.6. Glume morphology
      • 4.7. Grain morphology
      • 4.8. The use of morphology to assess and manage quality
      • 4.9. Ultrastructural morphology of the grain
      • 4.10. The use of grain composition to assess and manage quality
      • 4.11. The management of grain processing based on composition
      • 4.12. Future trends
  • Part II: Grain-Quality Characteristics for Specific Cereals
    • Chapter 5: Wheat: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Wheat as a genus
      • 5.3. Wheat production
      • 5.4. Unique products from wheat
      • 5.5. Wheat proteins
      • 5.6. Wheat carbohydrates
      • 5.7. Wheat lipids
      • 5.8. Wheat micronutrients
      • 5.9. Assessing grain quality
      • 5.10. Managing grain quality
      • 5.11. Future prospects
    • Chapter 6: Durum Wheat: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 6.1. Durum wheat: overview
      • 6.2. Grain, processing and consumer quality
    • Chapter 7: Rye: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Worldwide production and regional distribution
      • 7.3. The origins and taxonomy of rye
      • 7.4. The genetic constitution of rye
      • 7.5. F1 hybrid rye and genetic improvements
      • 7.6. Distinctive aspects of the plant and grain morphology of rye
      • 7.7. The composition of the rye grain
      • 7.8. Grain defects in rye
      • 7.9. Utilisation and nutritional advantages of rye
      • 7.10. Distinctive aspects of analysis for rye grain
      • 7.11. Distinctive aspects of managing rye-grain quality
      • 7.12. Future prospects
    • Chapter 8: Triticale: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. The history and genetics of triticale
      • 8.3. Worldwide production and regional distribution
      • 8.4. Head and grain morphology
      • 8.5. Grain composition
      • 8.6. Utilisation and nutritional (dis)advantages
      • 8.7. Grain-quality analysis and management; potential defects
      • 8.8. Future trends
    • Chapter 9: Barley: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Unique morphological and biochemical characteristics of barley
      • 9.3. Production and major uses of barley
      • 9.4. Specific quality requirements for barley
      • 9.5. Maintaining barley quality
      • 9.6. Future
      • 9.7. Further information
    • Chapter 10: Oats: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Classification, origin and history
      • 10.3. Unique morphological and biochemical characteristics
      • 10.4. Nutrition
      • 10.5. Production and major uses of oat
      • 10.6. Quality requirements for oats
      • 10.7. Maintaining and improving oat quality
      • 10.8. Future
    • Chapter 11: Corn: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 11.1. Introduction: the importance of corn (maize) production in the international arena
      • 11.2. Utilisation of corn
      • 11.3. The structure and chemical composition of corn
      • 11.4. Determination of corn quality
      • 11.5. Effects of agronomy and storage on quality
      • 11.6. Milling technologies
      • 11.7. Complex utilisation of corn
      • 11.8. Tortilla production
      • 11.9. The state of affairs with GM corn in the world
      • 11.10. Future trends
    • Chapter 12: Rice: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Unique characteristics of rice
      • 12.3. Traits of quality
      • 12.4. Environmental effects on rice quality
      • 12.5. Future challenges
    • Chapter 13: Sorghum and Millets: Grain-Quality Characteristics and Management of Quality Requirements
      • Abstract
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Taxonomy and grain production
      • 13.3. Grain structure and chemistry
      • 13.4. Traditional, novel and emerging uses
      • 13.5. Sorghum and millet end-use quality requirements and their assessment
      • 13.6. Sorghum and millet quality management systems
      • 13.7. Future directions
    • Chapter 14: Ancient Wheats and Pseudocereals for Possible use in Cereal-Grain Dietary Intolerances
      • Abstract
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Cereal-related health disorders
      • 14.3. Ancient wheat relatives
      • 14.4. Gluten-free management and gluten analysis
      • 14.5. Analysis and quality management of low FODMAP food products
      • 14.6. Further safety-related quality aspects
      • 14.7. Conclusions
  • Part III: Grain-Quality Analysis and Management
    • Chapter 15: Food Safety Aspects of Grain and Cereal Product Quality
      • Abstract
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. The role of agronomy
      • 15.3. Grain processing (flour milling)
      • 15.4. Food processing
      • 15.5. Conclusions
      • 15.6. Disclaimer
    • Chapter 16: Breeding for Grain-Quality Traits
      • Abstract
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Classical breeding for quality improvement
      • 16.3. Molecular breeding technologies
      • 16.4. Transgenic technology
      • 16.5. Mutation breeding
      • 16.6. Selection for protein content and bread-making quality
      • 16.7. Breeding for starch improvement in cereals
      • 16.8. Selection for cereals with increased dietary fibre and phytochemical content
      • 16.9. Role of environment and climate change on breeding for quality traits
      • 16.10. Conclusions
    • Chapter 17: Identification of Grain Variety and Quality Type
      • Abstract
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Variety identification
      • 17.3. Identification of quality type using molecular markers
      • 17.4. Future trends for marker-assisted selection of quality
      • 17.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 18: The Effects of Growth Environment and Agronomy on Grain Quality
      • Abstract
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Growing conditions and environment
      • 18.3. Sowing
      • 18.4. Weed control
      • 18.5. Disease control
      • 18.6. Crop nutrition
      • 18.7. Lodging and growth regulation
      • 18.8. Future trends
    • Chapter 19: Analysis of Grain Quality at Receival
      • Abstract
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. The US grain inspection system
      • 19.3. The Canadian grain inspection system
      • 19.4. The Australian grain inspection system
      • 19.5. The European Union (EU) grain inspection system
      • 19.6. The Argentine grain inspection system
      • 19.7. The Black Sea countries’ grain inspection system
      • 19.8. Traditional equipment used in wheat inspection at receival
      • 19.9. New technologies for use at grain receival
      • 19.10. Future trends
      • Acknowledgement
    • Chapter 20: Maintaining Grain Quality During Storage and Transport
      • Abstract
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Generic characteristics of storage
      • 20.3. Transport
      • 20.4. Future trends
      • 20.5. Sources of further information and advice
    • Chapter 21: Biosecurity: Safe-Guarding Quality at All Stages of the Grain Chain
      • Abstract
      • 21.1. Biosecurity definitions and the concept of the biosecurity continuum
      • 21.2. Grains in the context of plant-biosecurity systems to safeguard quality
      • 21.3. The changing nature of biosecurity risk in grains
  • Part IV: Processing Cereal Grains to Optimize Product Quality
    • Chapter 22: Assessing and Managing Wheat-Flour Quality Before, During and After Milling
      • Abstract
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. Procurement of wheat for processing
      • 22.3. Choice of wheats for blending
      • 22.4. History of milling
      • 22.5. Wheat milling
      • 22.6. Quality assessment during and after milling
      • 22.7. Whole-grain flour testing
      • 22.8. Healthy grain
      • 22.9. Wheat intolerance
      • 22.10. Sustainable farming and effects of climate change
      • 22.11. Future trends
    • Chapter 23: Industrial Processing of Grains Into Co-Products of Protein, Starch, Oils and Fibre
      • Abstract
      • 23.1. Introduction
      • 23.2. Starch
      • 23.3. Protein
      • 23.4. Other components
      • 23.5. Biofuels
      • 23.6. Bioplastics
      • 23.7. Resistant starch
      • 23.8. Future trends
    • Chapter 24: Optimisation of End-Product Quality for the Consumer
      • Abstract
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Meeting consumer-perceived quality needs
      • 24.3. The bread family
      • 24.4. Noodles
      • 24.5. Biscuits, cookies, wafers and snack foods
      • 24.6. Cakes
      • 24.7. Pasta and couscous
      • 24.8. Breakfast cereals
      • 24.9. Cereals eaten as the entire grain
      • 24.10. Beverages from grains
      • 24.11. Feed uses
      • 24.12. Industrial uses
      • 24.13. Future trends
  • Part V: Summary and Appendices
    • Chapter 25: Grain Quality: The Future is With the Consumer, the Scientist and the Technologist
      • Abstract
      • 25.1. Introduction
      • 25.2. The big picture
      • 25.3. Breeding for grain quality
      • 25.4. Grain growing
      • 25.5. Grain receival and segregation
      • 25.6. Grain storage and transport
      • 25.7. Grain processing
      • 25.8. Nutritional benefits of grain—real and perceived
      • 25.9. Government concerns, population pressures and world-trade policies relating to cereal grains
      • 25.10. Conclusions
  • Appendix 1: Composition of Grains and Grain Products
  • Appendix 2: Equivalence Between Metric, US and Chinese Units for the Grain Industry
  • Index

Description

Cereal Grains: Assessing and Managing Quality, Second Edition, provides a timely update to this key reference work. Thoroughly revised from the first edition, this volume examines the latest research and advances in the field. New chapters have been added on alternative grains, including ancient grains and pseudocereals, biosecurity, and industrial processing of grains, amongst others.

Quality and food safety are important throughout the value-addition chain, from breeding, production, harvest, storage, transport, processing, and marketing. At all stages, analysis is needed so that quality management can proceed intelligently. These considerations are examined for each of the major cereal species, including wheat (common and durum), rye and triticale, barley and oats, rice, maize (corn), pseudocereal species, sorghum, and the millets. Divided into five sections, the book analyses these for the range of cereal species before a final section summarizes key findings.

Key Features

  • Documents the latest research in cereal grains, from their nutraceutical and antioxidant traits, to novel detection methods
  • Provides a complete and thorough update to the first edition, analyzing the range of major cereal species
  • Presents detailed advice on the management of cereal quality at each stage of production and processing

Readership

Staff involved in grain production and processing, Academics and researchers in cereal and grain sciences, Postgraduate students in agriculture and food science


Details

No. of pages:
830
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081007303
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081007198

Ratings and Reviews


About the Editors

Colin Wrigley Editor

A Research Fellow at CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Colin W. Wrigley has received international recognition for his 48 years in cereal chemistry research. His work is described in nearly 600 publications and he was made a member of the Order of Australia in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.

Affiliations and Expertise

QAAFI, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Ian Batey Editor

Ian Batey has over thirty years of research experience in cereal science. He has published widely and been an Associate Editor of the journal Cereal Chemistry (AACCI) for eighteen years. He is a past recipient of the Founders Award of the Cereal Chemistry Division of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute.

Affiliations and Expertise

Sunset Cereal Services, Meadowbank, NSW, Australia

Diane Miskelly Editor

Diane (Di) Miskelly has over forty years’ experience in cereal science and technology in public and private sectors. Including consultancies to wheat, milling and food industries, wheat and grains research, Asian product research and development and manufacturing and commercial customer and internal company technical support in raw materials and processing of Asian and Middle eastern end products. She is widely published in cereals and grains in general, with a recent focus on publications in Asian foods.

Diane Miskelly, of Westcott Consultants, Australia, has more than forty years’ experience in cereal science and technology in public and private sectors, including consultancies to wheat, milling and food industries, wheat and grains research, and Asian product research and development and manufacturing.

Affiliations and Expertise

Westcott Consultants, Goulburn, Australia