Cell-Cell Signaling in Development

Cell-Cell Signaling in Development

1st Edition - June 17, 2022

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  • Editor: Thomas Kornberg
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128201619
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128201558

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Description

Cell-Cell Signaling in Development, Volume 150 covers new approaches and topics surrounding the diversity of animals, with recognized species now in the millions. Remarkably, the many distinct morphologies in the metazoan biosphere are generated by only a small number of genetically-encoded signaling systems that organize cells into patterned tissues, principally, the Wnt, Hedgehog, Bone morphogenic protein, fibroblast growth factor, Notch/Delta, and planar polarity systems whose roles orchestrating morphogenesis are widespread and evolutionarily conserved. Users will find the latest information on these elegant systems, along with conceptual links to signaling in plants and ideas that are emerging from recent progress.

Key Features

  • Presents the newest information on signaling proteins of animal development
  • Covers the processes that make and distribute signaling proteins
  • Includes coverage of cell-cell interactions that pattern tissues

Readership

Researchers and students

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Hedgehog on track: Long-distant signal transport and transfer through direct cell-to-cell contact
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Dynamic cytonemes and gradient formation models
  • 3: Cytoneme-mediated Hh signaling between different cell types
  • 4: Cytoneme establishment and regulation: The weight of cell adhesion in Hh signaling
  • 5: Transport through the extending protrusion
  • 6: Signal transfer, reception and retraction
  • 7: Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Receptor control by membrane-tethered ubiquitin ligases in development and tissue homeostasis
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Classification of membrane-tethered E3s
  • 3: The R-spondin-ZNRF3/RNF43 signaling system tunes WNT and BMP receptor abundance
  • 4: Regulation of Hedgehog and melanocortin receptor abundance by the membrane-recruited E3 MGRN1
  • 5: Conclusions
  • Note added in proof
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Three: An itch for things remote: The journey of Wnts
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction to Wnt signaling
  • 2: Biogenesis and transport to the plasma membrane
  • 3: Modes of Wnt secretion
  • 4: Wnt receptors and their regulation
  • 5: The last mile problem
  • 6: Unanswered questions
  • 7: Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Dynamic regulation of human epidermal differentiation by adhesive and mechanical forces
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Epidermal adhesion mechanisms
  • 3: Keratinocyte–substrate interactions at the single cell level
  • 4: Role of cell–cell adhesion in regulating differentiation: A reductionist approach
  • 5: Cross-talk between cell–cell and cell–ECM adhesion mechanisms: Building a multilayered epidermis
  • 6: Physical forces and the control of differentiation of individual keratinocytes
  • 7: Physical forces acting at the level of epidermal assembly
  • 8: Conclusions and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Cell signaling pathways controlling an axis organizing center in the zebrafish
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Defining the zebrafish dorsal organizer
  • 3: Establishment of the zebrafish dorsal organizer
  • 4: Cell signaling underlying the organizer's dorsalizing activities
  • 5: Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Local BMP signaling: A sensor for synaptic activity that balances synapse growth and function
  • Abstract
  • 1: BMP signaling pathways
  • 2: Synapse assembly and recruitment of neurotransmitter receptors at the fly neuromuscular junction
  • 3: Distinct mechanisms recruit type-A and type-B glutamate receptors
  • 4: pMad as a sensor of synapse activity
  • 5: A positive feedback loop stabilizes glutamate receptor subtypes as a function of activity
  • 6: Motor neurons coordinate multiple BMP signaling to balance NMJ growth with synapse maturation/stabilization
  • 7: Future challenges
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Wnt-frizzled planar cell polarity signaling in the regulation of cell motility
  • Abstract
  • 1: Overview of planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling
  • 2: PCP and cell motility in Drosophila
  • 3: PCP regulated cell motility processes in vertebrates
  • 4: Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Eight: Talking to your neighbors across scales: Long-distance Notch signaling during patterning
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Patterning in space and time
  • 3: Notch mediated patterning across scales
  • 4: Modeling long-range Notch signaling
  • 5: Case studies of long-range Notch signaling
  • 6: Evolvability of patterns
  • 7: Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References

Product details

  • No. of pages: 344
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: June 17, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128201619
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128201558

About the Serial Volume Editor

Thomas Kornberg

Thomas Kornberg is a member of the Cardiovascular Research Institute and Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics faculties at the University of California, San Francisco. His research has spanned DNA enzymology (the discovery of E. coli DNA polymerases 2 and 3), developmental and molecular genetics (cloning and functional characterizations of Drosophila genes including engrailed, cubitus interruptus, and hedgehog), and cell biology (discovery and functional characterization of cytonemes, the specialized filopodia that mediate dispersion and cell-cell exchange of morphogen signaling proteins). Research in his lab currently focuses on the mechanisms and processes that distribute patterning and positional information within cells and across tissues.

Affiliations and Expertise

Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA

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