Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Photonic Applications - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857094179, 9780857098627

Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Photonic Applications

1st Edition

Editors: Shinji Yamashita Yahachi Saito Jong Hyun Choi
eBook ISBN: 9780857098627
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857094179
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 31st August 2013
Page Count: 416
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Table of Contents

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Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials

Part I: Optical properties and fabrication of carbon nanotubes and graphene

Chapter 1: Fundamental optical properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Basic optical properties of carbon nanotubes

1.3 Novel excitonic properties of carbon nanotubes

1.4 Conclusion

Chapter 2: Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)

2.3 Single-walled carbon nanotube synthesis for photonic applications

2.4 Graphene synthesis

2.5 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 3: Carbon nanotube and graphene photonic devices: nonlinearity enhancement and novel preparation approaches

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Nonlinearity of carbon nanotubes and graphene; saturable absorption

3.3 Novel interaction schemes of propagating light with carbon nanostructures

3.4 Highly efficient preparation of fiber mode-lockers

3.5 Conclusion

Part II: Carbon nanotubes and graphene for laser applications

Chapter 4: Optical gain and lasing in carbon nanotubes

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Extraction of semiconducting carbon nanotubes

4.3 Towards carbon nanotubes-based lasers

4.4 Optical gain in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)

4.5 Conclusion

Chapter 5: Carbon nanotube and graphene-based fiber lasers

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Carbon nanotube and graphene saturable absorbers

5.3 Mode-locked fiber lasers employing graphene and CNTs

5.4 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 6: Carbon-nanotube-based bulk solid-state lasers

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-based saturable absorbers

6.3 Device characteristics

6.4 Mode-locking of bulk solid-state lasers

6.5 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 7: Electromagnetic nonlinearities in graphene

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Electronic properties of graphene

7.3 Linear electrodynamics of graphene

7.4 Nonlinear electromagnetic response of graphene

7.5 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 8: Carbon nanotube-based nonlinear photonic devices

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Design and fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nonlinear photonic devices

8.3 Applications of CNT-based nonlinear photonic devices

8.4 Conclusion

Part III: Carbon-based optoelectronics

Chapter 9: Carbon nanotube solar cells

Abstract:

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotubes

9.3 Scope of the study

9.4 Carbon nanotubes in solid-state bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells

9.5 Carbon nanotubes in liquid phase photoelectrochemical cells: donor–acceptor hybrids

9.6 Single-walled carbon nanotubes in photoactive layer of dye-sensitized solar cells

9.7 Carbon nanotubes as electrode materials in photovoltaic devices

9.8 Developing technologies

9.9 Conclusion and future trends

9.10 Acknowledgement

Chapter 10: Carbon nanotube-based optical platforms for biomolecular detection

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Optical-sensing mechanism

10.3 Carbon nanotube-based optical sensors for chemical and biological molecules

10.4 Advanced optical-sensing applications

10.5 Conclusion

10.6 Acknowledgment

Chapter 11: Carbon nanotube-based photovoltaic and light-emitting diodes

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction to carbon nanotube (CNT) diodes

11.2 Doping-free fabrication and characteristics of CNT diodes

11.3 Performance and optimization of CNT photovoltaic diodes

11.4 Photovoltage multiplication in CNT diodes

11.5 Carbon nanotube-based light-emitting diodes

11.6 Conclusion and future trends

11.7 Acknowledgements

Chapter 12: Hybrid carbon nanotube–liquid crystal nanophotonic devices

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Uniform patterned growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

12.3 Simple optics of nematic liquid crystals

12.4 Carbon nanotubes as electrode structures

12.5 Reconfigurable microlens arrays

12.6 Transparent nanophotonic devices

12.7 Photonic band gap structures using MWCNTs

12.8 Towards photonic metamaterials

12.9 Conclusion

Chapter 13: Quantum light sources based on individual carbon nanotubes

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Exciton emission from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)

13.3 Blinking and spectral diffusion phenomena in individual SWCNTs

13.4 Techniques to suppress and remove blinking and spectral diffusion

13.5 Quantum light sources based on SWCNTs

13.6 Conclusion and future trends

13.7 Acknowledgement

Index


Description

The optical properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene make them potentially suitable for a variety of photonic applications. Carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications explores the properties of these exciting materials and their use across a variety of applications.

Part one introduces the fundamental optical properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene before exploring how carbon nanotubes and graphene are synthesised. A further chapter focusses on nonlinearity enhancement and novel preparation approaches for carbon nanotube and graphene photonic devices. Chapters in part two discuss carbon nanotubes and graphene for laser applications and highlight optical gain and lasing in carbon nanotubes, carbon nanotube and graphene-based fiber lasers, carbon-nanotube-based bulk solid-state lasers, electromagnetic nonlinearities in graphene, and carbon nanotube-based nonlinear photonic devices. Finally, part three focusses on carbon-based optoelectronics and includes chapters on carbon nanotube solar cells, a carbon nanotube-based optical platform for biomolecular detection, hybrid carbon nanotube-liquid crystal nanophotonic devices, and quantum light sources based on individual carbon nanotubes.

Carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications is a technical resource for materials scientists, electrical engineers working in the photonics and optoelectronics industry and academics and researchers interested in the field.

Key Features

  • Covers the properties and fabrication of carbon nanotubes and graphene for photonic applications
  • Considers the uses of carbon nanotubes and graphene for laser applications
  • Explores numerous carbon-based light emitters and detectors

Readership

Academics and researchers in the fields of: solid state physics, materials science, optics, and quantum electronics; Materials scientists and electrical engineers in the photonics and optoelectronics industry


Details

No. of pages:
416
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2013
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857098627
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857094179

Reviews

"With the increasing interest in carbon nanostructures…, textbooks and review articles continue to appear with a special focus on new findings and their relation to prior knowledge. The recent volume entitled 'Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Photonic Applications'…fits nicely into this context…The individual chapters provide excellent coverage of the literature with each chapter containing many pertinent and current references."--MaterialsView.com, December 17, 2013
The individual chapters provide excellent coverage of the literature with each chapter containing many pertinent and current references., Materials Views


About the Editors

Shinji Yamashita Editor

Shinji Yamashita is a Professor at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Japan.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Molecular Medicine, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki, Japan

Yahachi Saito Editor

Yahachi Saito is a Professor at the Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Japan.

Jong Hyun Choi Editor

Jong Hyun Choi is a Professor at the School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, USA.

Affiliations and Expertise

Purdue University, USA