Carbon Nanotechnology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444518552, 9780080459325

Carbon Nanotechnology

1st Edition

Recent Developments in Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science and Device Applications

Editors: Liming Dai
eBook ISBN: 9780080459325
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444518552
Imprint: Elsevier Science
Published Date: 18th April 2006
Page Count: 750
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Description

Nanotechnology is no longer a merely social talking point and is beginning to affect the lives of everyone. Carbon nanotechnology as a major shaper of new nanotechnologies has evolved into a truly interdisciplinary field, which encompasses chemistry, physics, biology, medicine, materials science and engineering. This is a field in which a huge amount of literature has been generated within recent years, and the number of publications is still increasing every year. Carbon Nanotechnology aims to provide a timely coverage of the recent development in the field with updated reviews and remarks by world-renowned experts. Intended to be an exposition of cutting-edge research and development rather than a kind of conference proceeding, Carbon Nanotechnology will be very useful not only to experienced scientists and engineers, who wish to broaden their knowledge of the wide-ranging nanotechnology and/or to develop practical devices, but also to graduate and senior undergraduate students who look to make their mark in this field of the future.

Key Features

· A comprehensive treatment from materials chemistry and structure-property to practical applications · Offers an in-depth analysis of various carbon nanotechnologies from both fundamental and practical perspectives · An easily accessible assessment of the materials properties and device performances based on all of the major classes of carbon nanomaterials, including: carbon fiber; diamond; C60; and carbon nanotubes · A concise compilation of the practical applications of carbon nanotechnologies from polymer-carbon nanocomposites to sensors, electron emitters, and molecular electronics

Readership

Scientists, Engineers, Graduate and Senior Undergraduate Students and Libraries.

Table of Contents

  • FOREWORD
  • PREFACE
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
  • Chapter 1: From conventional technology to carbon nanotechnology: The fourth industrial revolution and the discoveries of C60, carbon nanotube and nanodiamond
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD
    • 2. NANOTECHNOLOGY—THE FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
    • 3. CARBON NANOTECHNOLOGY
  • Chapter 2: Synthesis, growth mechanism and processing of carbon nanotubes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. SYNTHETIC STRATEGIES
    • 3. MECHANISM OF GROWTH
    • 4. PURIFICATION AND SEPARATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES AND RELATED ASPECTS
  • Chapter 3: Solid-state formation of carbon nanotubes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION OF A BALL MILLING-ANNEALING METHOD
    • 2. HIGH-ENERGY BALL MILLING
    • 3. HIGH ENERGY BALL MILLING OF GRAPHITE
    • 4. SOLID-STATE FORMATION PROCESS OF CNTs
    • 5. FORMATION MECHANISMS
    • 6. SUMMARY
  • Chapter 4: Catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND
    • 2. CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF SWNT
    • 3. DISCUSSIONS
    • 4. SUMMARIES AND OUTLOOKS
  • Chapter 5: Fabrication of fullerene nanostructures
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY-ORDERED C60 AND C70 ADLAYERS ON SINGLE-CRYSTAL SURFACES
    • 3. ADLAYERS OF CALIXARENE AND CALIXARENE/FULLERENE COMPLEX
    • 4. ELECTROCHEMICAL CONSTRUCTION OF HIGHLY ORDERED C60 DERIVATIVE/PPV COMPOSITE ADLAYER ON CU(111)
    • 5. THE FABRICATION OF FULLERENE NANOWIRES
    • 6. THE ELECTROCHEMISTRY OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBE FILM
  • Chapter 6: Carbon blacks as the source materials for carbon nanotechnology
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. REVIEW OF SOOT AND CARBON BLACKS
    • 3. THE STRUCTURE AND FORMATION MECHANISM OF CARBON BLACKS
    • 4. CARBON BLACKS AS INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS
    • 5. CARBON NANO-ONIONS
    • 6. PRODUCTION OF DIAMOND FROM SOOT
    • 7. PRODUCTION OF C60/C70 AND SMALL CARBON NANO-ONIONS BY PYROLYSIS
    • 8. A TENTATIVE PROPOSAL FOR CARBON BLACKS-DERIVED NANO-CARBON INDUSTRIES
  • Chapter 7: Functionalization and applications of [60]fullerene
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. CYCLOADDITIONS REACTIONS
    • 3. NUCLEOPHILIC ADDITION TO [60]FULLERENE
    • 4. MATERIALS-ORIENTED APPLICATIONS
  • Chapter 8: Functionalization and applications of carbon nanotubes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. COVALENT FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 3. NON-COVALENT FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 4. FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES WITH OTHER PHYSICAL CHEMICAL METHODS
    • 5. SELF-ASSEMBLY OF MODIFIED CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 6. FUNCTIONALIZATION OF ALIGNED CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 7. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF THE MODIFIED CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 8. CONCLUSIONS
  • Chapter 9: Biological activity of pristine fullerene C60
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. WHY PRISTINE FULLERENE C60?
    • 3. WHAT CAN BE INTERESTING IN PRISTINE FULLERENE FOR MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY?
    • 4. PRISTINE FULLERENE C60 PREPARATIONS FOR BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE
    • 5. IS PRISTINE FULLERENE C60 TOXIC?
    • 6. CONCLUSION
  • Chapter 10: Separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION
    • 3. ENRICHMENT AND SEPARATION
    • 4. OUTLOOK
  • Chapter 11: Electrochemical properties of carbon nanotubes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. CARBON NANOTUBE-BASED ELECTRODES
    • 3. CARBON NANOTUBE FUNCTIONALISATION
    • 4. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES
    • 5. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTION
  • Chapter 12: Carbon nanotubes: Surface, porosity, and related applications
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. ADSORPTION IN CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 3. POROUS STRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 4. SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 5. CAPILLARITY AND FILLING IN CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 6. CONTROL AND MODIFICATION OF SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS AND POROUS STRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 7. RELATED APPLICATIONS
    • 8. CONCLUDING REMARKS
  • Chapter 13: Carbon nanotubes as nanoelectromechanical systems components
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 3. ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 4. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 5. INTERACTION BETWEEN GASES AND CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 6. INTERACTION BETWEEN WATER/ELECTROLYTES AND CARBON NANOTUBES
    • 7. CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEMS FROM CARBON NANOTUBES
  • Chapter 14: Aligned carbon nanotube membranes
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. GRAND CHALLENGES AND APPLICATIONS OF MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY
    • 2. CURRENT POROUS MEMBRANE SYSTEMS AND CHALLENGES
    • 3. ORDERED NANO-POROUS MEMBRANES
    • 4. CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSPORT THEORY
    • 5. APPROACH TO MAKING MWCNT MEMBRANES
    • 6. TRANSPORT THROUGH CNTS
    • 7. ELECTROCHEMICAL OXIDATION AND BI- FUNCTIONALITY
    • 8. FUTURE D IRECTIONS
  • Chapter 15: C60 and carbon nanotube sensors
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. FULLERENE C60 SENSORS
    • 3. CARBON NANOTUBE SENSORS
    • 4. CONCLUSIONS
  • Chapter 16: Carbon nanotubes for electron emitting devices
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. FIELD EMISSION FROM SINGLE CNTs
    • 3. CNT FILM EMITTERS
    • 4. APPLICATIONS OF CNT CATHODES TO ELECTRON EMITTING DEVICES
    • 5. CONCLUSIONS
  • Chapter 17: Optical limiters and photovoltaic devices based on C60, carbon nanotubes and their nanocomposites
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. OPTICAL LIMITING PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOMATERIALS
    • 3. ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAIC DEVICES WITH CARBON NANOMATERIALS
    • 4. OUTLOOK
    • 5. SUMMARY
  • Chapter 18: Carbon nanotube and epoxy composites for military applications
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. STRUCTURE-PROPERTY RELATIONSHIPS
    • 3. MILITARY APPLICATIONS
    • 4. SUMMARY
  • Chapter 19: Polymer and carbon nanotube composites for space applications
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 2. SPACE E NVIRONMENT
    • 3. POTENTIAL SPACE APPLICATIONS OF CARBON NANOTUBE COMPOSITES
    • 4. SUMMARY
  • Chapter 20: From carbon nanotechnology to bionanotechnology: Protein and peptide nanofibrils and nanowires
    • Publisher Summary
    • 1. BIONANOTECHNOLOGY
    • 2. SIMILARITIES BETWEEN FULLERENE C AND VIRUSES
    • 3. FULLERENE-BINDING PEPTIDE DOMAIN
    • 4. BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES: PROTEINS, PEPTIDES, AND PRIONS
    • 5. NATURAL NANOSTRUCTURES: NANOFIBRILS AND NANOWIRES
    • 6. HUMAN PATHOLOGY AND PROTEIN GALVANIZATION
    • 7. APPLICATIONS OF BIONANOTECHNOLOGY: DIAGNOSTICS, TREATMENTS, AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
750
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier Science 2006
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier Science
eBook ISBN:
9780080459325
Hardcover ISBN:
9780444518552

About the Editor

Liming Dai

Professor Liming Dai is currently the Wright Brothers Institute Endowed Chair Professor of Nanomaterials at the University of Dayton. His expertise lies across numerous fields, including the synthesis, chemical modification and device fabrication of conjugated polymers, C60-containing polymers and carbon nanotubes. Professor Dai has published over 150 scientific papers in international journals and a research monograph on intelligent macromolecules and is inventor on several patents. He is on the editorial board of two international journals and a referee for about 30 scientific journals. Regarded by peers as an authority on functional polymers and carbon nanotechnology, he regularly lectures across the United States and abroad.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Chemicals and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, U.S.A.