Brydson's Plastics Materials - 8th Edition - ISBN: 9780323358248, 9780323370226

Brydson's Plastics Materials

8th Edition

Editors: Marianne Gilbert
eBook ISBN: 9780323370226
Hardcover ISBN: 9780323358248
Imprint: Butterworth-Heinemann
Published Date: 11th October 2016
Page Count: 892
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Description

Brydson's Plastics Materials, Eighth Edition, provides a comprehensive overview of the commercially available plastics materials that bridge the gap between theory and practice. The book enables scientists to understand the commercial implications of their work and provides engineers with essential theory.

Since the previous edition, many developments have taken place in plastics materials, such as the growth in the commercial use of sustainable bioplastics, so this book brings the user fully up-to-date with the latest materials, references, units, and figures that have all been thoroughly updated.

The book remains the authoritiative resource for engineers, suppliers, researchers, materials scientists, and academics in the field of polymers, including current best practice, processing, and material selection information and health and safety guidance, along with discussions of sustainability and the commercial importance of various plastics and additives, including nanofillers and graphene as property modifiers.

With a 50 year history as the principal reference in the field of plastics material, and fully updated by an expert team of polymer scientists and engineers, this book is essential reading for researchers and practitioners in this field.

Key Features

  • Presents a one-stop-shop for easily accessible information on plastics materials, now updated to include the latest biopolymers, high temperature engineering plastics, thermoplastic elastomers, and more
  • Includes thoroughly revised and reorganised material as contributed by an expert team who make the book relevant to all plastics engineers, materials scientists, and students of polymers
  • Includes the latest guidance on health, safety, and sustainability, including materials safety data sheets, local regulations, and a discussion of recycling issues

Readership

Plastics suppliers, processors, those involved in the selection of plastics for various applications, industrial researchers, academia: the book has been used as a reference on Plastics Materials/Polymer Technology courses in numerous universities

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • About the Authors
  • Preface to the Eighth Edition
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations for Plastics
  • Standard Test Methods
  • Chapter 1. Plastics Materials: Introduction and Historical Development
    • 1.1. Introduction
    • 1.2. The First Plastics
    • 1.3. Pre-1900
    • 1.4. 1900–1930
    • 1.5. 1930–1940
    • 1.6. 1940–1950
    • 1.7. 1950–1960
    • 1.8. 1960–2000
    • 1.9. Raw Materials for Plastics
    • 1.10. Plastics Now
  • Chapter 2. The Chemical Nature of Plastics Polymerization
    • 2.1. Introduction
    • 2.2. Linear and Cross-Linked Molecules
    • 2.3. Copolymers and Blends
    • 2.4. Molar Mass and Molar Mass Distribution
    • 2.5. The Chemistry of Chain Reaction Polymerization
    • 2.6. Step Reaction Polymerization
  • Chapter 3. States of Aggregation in Polymers
    • 3.1. Introduction
    • 3.2. Amorphous Polymers
    • 3.3. Crystalline Polymers
    • 3.4. Cross-Linked Structures
    • 3.5. Impact Modification of Plastics
    • 3.6. Summary
  • Chapter 4. Relation of Structure to Thermal and Mechanical Properties
    • 4.1. Introduction
    • 4.2. Factors Affecting the Glass Transition Temperature
    • 4.3. Factors Affecting the Ability to Crystallize
    • 4.4. Factors Affecting the Crystalline Melting Point
    • 4.5. Transition Temperatures in Copolymers
    • 4.6. Thermodynamic Treatment of Melting Temperature
    • 4.7. Some Individual Properties
  • Chapter 5. Relation of Structure to Chemical Properties
    • 5.1. Introduction
    • 5.2. Chemical Bonds
    • 5.3. Polymer Solubility
    • 5.4. Chemical Reactivity
    • 5.5. Effects of Thermal, Photochemical, and High-Energy Radiation
    • 5.6. Aging and Weathering
    • 5.7. Diffusion and Permeability
    • 5.8. Fire and Plastics
  • Chapter 6. Relation of Structure to Electrical and Optical Properties
    • 6.1. Electrical Properties
    • 6.2. Optical Properties
  • Chapter 7. Additives for Plastics
    • 7.1. Introduction
    • 7.2. Antioxidants
    • 7.3. Colorants
    • 7.4. Plasticizers and Softeners
    • 7.5. Lubricants and Flow Promoters
    • 7.6. Impact Modifiers
    • 7.7. Fire Retardant Additives
    • 7.8. Blowing Agents
    • 7.9. Other Additives
  • Chapter 8. Fillers (Including Fiber Reinforcements)
    • 8.1. Introduction
    • 8.2. Reasons for Using Fillers
    • 8.3. Important Characteristics of Particulate Fillers for Plastics Applications
    • 8.4. Principal Filler Types Used in Thermoplastics and Thermosets
    • 8.5. The Use of Surface Modifiers
    • 8.6. Examples of Filler Use in Plastics
    • 8.7. Sustainability and Recycling Issues Affecting Fillers and Composites
  • Chapter 9. Processing, Design, and Performance of Plastics Products
    • 9.1. Introduction
    • 9.2. Main Processing Techniques
    • 9.3. Morphology and Processing
    • 9.4. Time-Dependent Properties
    • 9.5. Stiffness
    • 9.6. Toughness
    • 9.7. Friction
    • 9.8. Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 10. Polyethylene
    • 10.1. Introduction
    • 10.2. Preparation of Monomer
    • 10.3. Polymerization
    • 10.4. Structure and Properties of PE
    • 10.5. Properties of PE
    • 10.6. Additives
    • 10.7. Processing
    • 10.8. PEs of Low and High Molar Mass
    • 10.9. Cross-Linked PE
    • 10.10. Oriented PE
    • 10.11. Other Copolymers of Ethylene
    • 10.12. Applications
  • Chapter 11. Polypropylene and Other Polyolefins
    • 11.1. Polypropylene
    • 11.2. Poly(but-1-ene)
    • 11.3. Poly(4-methylpentene-1)
  • Chapter 12. Plastics Based on Styrene
    • 12.1. Introduction
    • 12.2. Preparation/Source of Monomer
    • 12.3. Polymerization
    • 12.4. Properties and Structure of Polystyrene
    • 12.5. General Properties
    • 12.6. General-Purpose High-Impact Polystyrene
    • 12.7. Styrene–Acrylonitrile Copolymers
    • 12.8. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene
    • 12.9. Rubber-Modified SAN and Related Copolymers
    • 12.10. SMA Copolymers
    • 12.11. Other Styrenic Polymers
    • 12.12. Stereoregular Polystyrene
    • 12.13. Processing of Plastics Based on Styrene
    • 12.14. Expanded Polystyrene
    • 12.15. Oriented Polystyrene
    • 12.16. Polystyrene Blends With Polyphenylene Oxide
    • 12.17. Future Developments for Plastics Based on Styrene
  • Chapter 13. Poly(Vinyl Chloride)
    • 13.1. Introduction
    • 13.2. Sustainability of PVC
    • 13.3. Preparation of VC
    • 13.4. Polymerization
    • 13.5. Structure of PVC
    • 13.6. Morphology of PVC
    • 13.7. PVC Degradation
    • 13.8. Compounding Ingredients
    • 13.9. Formulations
    • 13.10. Properties of PVC Compounds
    • 13.11. Processing
    • 13.12. Fusion of PVC
    • 13.13. Applications of PVC
    • 13.14. PVC Copolymers and Chlorinated PVC
    • 13.15. Modification of PVC Structure
  • Chapter 14. Fluorine-Containing Polymers
    • 14.1. Introduction
    • 14.2. Preparation and Properties of Fluoropolymers
    • 14.3. Processing of Fluoropolymers
    • 14.4. Applications of Fluoropolymers
    • 14.5. Safety and Hygiene
    • 14.6. Recycling of Fluoropolymers
    • 14.7. Recent Trends
    • Appendix 14.1: Typical Applications for Fluoroplastics
  • Chapter 15. Miscellaneous Vinyl Thermoplastics
    • 15.1. Introduction
    • 15.2. Vinylidene Chloride Polymers and Copolymers
    • 15.3. Poly(vinyl acetate)
    • 15.4. Poly(vinyl alcohol)
    • 15.5. Poly(vinyl acetals)
    • 15.6. Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymers
    • 15.7. Other Vinyl Polymers
  • Chapter 16. Acrylic Plastics
    • 16.1. Introduction
    • 16.2. Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)
    • 16.3. Methyl Methacrylate Polymers With Enhanced Impact Resistance and Softening Point
    • 16.4. Acrylic Adhesives
    • 16.5. Hydrophilic Polymers
    • 16.6. Poly(methacrylimide)
    • 16.7. Other Acrylic Polymers
  • Chapter 17. Polycarbonates
    • 17.1. Introduction
    • 17.2. Formation of Reactants for Polycarbonate Production
    • 17.3. Polycarbonate Production
    • 17.4. Chemical Modifications
    • 17.5. Basic Properties of the Polymer
    • 17.6. Compounding
    • 17.7. Comparison of Properties With Engineering Thermoplastics
    • 17.8. Processing
    • 17.9. Applications
    • 17.10. Polycarbonate Blends
  • Chapter 18. Aliphatic Polyamides
    • 18.1. Introduction
    • 18.2. Intermediates for Aliphatic Polyamides
    • 18.3. Polymerization of Aliphatic Polyamides
    • 18.4. Structure of Aliphatic Polyamides
    • 18.5. Properties of Aliphatic Polyamides
    • 18.6. Additives
    • 18.7. Fiber-Filled Polyamides
    • 18.8. Processing of Polyamides
    • 18.9. Applications of Polyamides
    • 18.10. Polyamides of Enhanced Solubility
    • 18.11. Other Aliphatic Polyamides
    • 18.12. Polyamide Blends
  • Chapter 19. Polyacetals
    • 19.1. Introduction
    • 19.2. Preparation of Formaldehyde
    • 19.3. Acetal Resins
    • 19.4. Polyethers from Glycols and Alkylene Oxides
  • Chapter 20. Thermoplastic Polyesters
    • 20.1. Introduction
    • 20.2. Production of Thermoplastic Polyesters
    • 20.3. Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate)
    • 20.4. Poly(Butylene Terephthalate)
    • 20.5. Other Thermoplastic Polyesters
    • 20.6. Copolyesters
    • 20.7. New-Generation Copolyesters
  • Chapter 21. High-Temperature Engineering Thermoplastics
    • 21.1. Introduction
    • 21.2. Polyphthalamides
    • 21.3. Sulfones
    • 21.4. Polyphenylene Sulfide
    • 21.5. Imide Polymers
    • 21.6. Polyaryletherketones
    • 21.7. Polybenzimidazole
    • 21.8. Liquid Crystal Polymers
  • Chapter 22. Cellulose Plastics
    • 22.1. Nature and Occurrence of Cellulose
    • 22.2. Cellulose Esters
    • 22.3. Cellulose Ethers
    • 22.4. Regenerated Cellulose
  • Chapter 23. Bioplastics: New Routes, New Products
    • 23.1. Introduction: Definitions and Classification
    • 23.2. Bioplastics Development: Generic Considerations
    • 23.3. Biodegradable and Compostable Plastics
    • 23.4. Bio-Based Intermediates in Conventional Plastics Production
    • 23.5. Biodegradation and Compostability Principles and Testing Procedures
    • 23.6. Conclusions
  • Chapter 24. Thermoplastic Elastomers
    • 24.1. History
    • 24.2. General Definition of Thermoplastic Elastomer
    • 24.3. General Definition of Thermoplastic Elastomer
    • 24.4. Comparison of Thermoplastic Elastomers
    • 24.5. Processing of TPE Materials
    • 24.6. Markets, Applications, and Suppliers of TPE Materials
  • Chapter 25. Aldehyde Polymers: Phenolics and Aminoplastics
    • 25.1. Introduction
    • 25.2. Monomers for Common Aldehyde Polymers
    • 25.3. Oligomerization or Resinification of Aldehyde Systems
    • 25.4. Molding Materials
    • 25.5. Laminates
    • 25.6. Adhesive Applications
    • 25.7. Other Applications
    • 25.8. Other Aldehyde-Based and -Related Polymers
  • Chapter 26. Unsaturated Polyester Resins
    • 26.1. Introduction
    • 26.2. Polyester Polymers and Resins
    • 26.3. Unsaturated Polyesters Resins for Lamination
    • 26.4. Glass Fiber Polyester Composites
    • 26.5. Conclusions
  • Chapter 27. Epoxy Resins
    • 27.1. Introduction
    • 27.2. Preparation of Resins from Bisphenol A
    • 27.3. Curing of Epoxy Resins
    • 27.4. Miscellaneous Epoxy Resins
    • 27.5. Diluents, Flexibilizers, and Other Additives
    • 27.6. Epoxy Vinyl Ester Resins
    • 27.7. Toughened Epoxy Resins
    • 27.8. Fire Resistance
    • 27.9. Epoxy Nanocomposites
    • 27.10. Applications
  • Chapter 28. Isocyanate-Based Polymers: Polyurethanes, Polyureas, Polyisocyanurates, and their Copolymers
    • 28.1. Introduction
    • 28.2. Market Statistics
    • 28.3. Isocyanates and their Common Coreactants: Synthesis, Reactions, and Kinetics
    • 28.4. Polyalcohols—Polyols
    • 28.5. Other Reactants and Additives
    • 28.6. Reaction Kinetics, Structure/Properties Relationships
    • 28.7. Conversion of Isocyanates Into Polymeric Products
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
892
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Butterworth-Heinemann 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
eBook ISBN:
9780323370226
Hardcover ISBN:
9780323358248

About the Editor

Marianne Gilbert

Marianne Gilbert is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Materials at Loughborough University, United Kingdom. Marianne obtained a BSc in Applied Chemistry from Aston University, followed by 18 months at Dunlop Research Department. She then returned to Aston to study for a PhD in Polymer Chemistry which was awarded in 1970. Marianne became a Lecturer in the Institute of Polymer Technology and Materials Engineering at Loughborough in 1970 and was subsequently promoted to Senior Lecturer, Reader and Professor. She spent two years as Acting Head of Department then six years as Head of Department from 1994 – 2000. She is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, and received that Institute’s Swinburne Award. She retired at the end of 2013.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Emeritus, Department of Materials,Loughborough University, UK