Brewing Microbiology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782423317, 9781782423492

Brewing Microbiology

1st Edition

Managing Microbes, Ensuring Quality and Valorising Waste

Editors: Annie Hill
eBook ISBN: 9781782423492
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782423317
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 11th June 2015
Page Count: 506
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Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • Preface
  • Introduction to brewing microbiology
  • Acknowledgments
  • Part One. Yeast: properties and management
    • 1. Yeast: an overview
      • 1.1. Yeast species/strains used in brewing and distilling
      • 1.2. Yeast cell structure
      • 1.3. Comparison of lager and ale yeast
      • 1.4. Flocculation
    • 2. Yeast quality assessment, management and culture maintenance
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Objectives of wort fermentation
      • 2.3. Brewer’s yeast species
      • 2.4. Yeast management
      • 2.5. Storage of yeast stock cultures between propagations
      • 2.6. Preservation of yeast strains
      • 2.7. Yeast propagation
      • 2.8. Yeast collection
      • 2.9. Yeast storage
      • 2.10. Yeast washing
      • 2.11. Yeast stress
      • 2.12. Dried yeast
      • 2.13. Conclusions
    • 3. Modelling yeast growth and metabolism for optimum performance
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Parameters influencing yeast growth and fermentation of barley malt
      • 3.3. Modelling: techniques and applications
      • 3.4. Advanced fermentation techniques
      • 3.5. Future trends and sources for further information
      • 3.6. Closing remarks
    • 4. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeasts
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Metabolic engineering
      • 4.3. Tools for metabolic engineering
      • 4.4. Strategies for metabolic engineering
      • 4.5. Brewing yeast genetics
      • 4.6. Targets for engineering of brewing yeast
      • 4.7. Future perspective
      • 4.8. Additional sources of further information
    • 5. Yeast identification and characterization
      • 5.1. Biodiversity and characterization of yeast species and strains from a brewing environment
      • 5.2. Microbiological, physiological, identification, and typing methods
      • 5.3. Brewing yeast cell count/viability/vitality methods
      • 5.4. Monitoring yeast and fermentation
  • Part Two. Spoilage bacteria and other contaminants
    • 6. Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in the barley-to-beer chain
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Barley malt: a key raw material in brewing
      • 6.3. Evolution of fungi in the barley–malt ecosystem
      • 6.4. Impacts of barley-associated fungi on malt quality
      • 6.5. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium mycotoxins
      • 6.6. Fate of mycotoxins in the barley-to-beer chain
      • 6.7. Regulation of mycotoxins in Europe
      • 6.8. Emerging mycotoxin issues
      • 6.9. Preventive actions
      • 6.10. Future trends
      • 6.11. Sources of further information and advice
    • 7. Gram-positive spoilage bacteria in brewing
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Beer-spoilage LAB
      • 7.3. Hop resistance mechanisms in beer-spoilage LAB
      • 7.4. Subculture and preservation methods of beer-spoilage LAB
      • 7.5. Other Gram-positive bacteria in brewing
      • 7.6. Concluding remarks
    • 8. Gram-negative spoilage bacteria in brewing
      • 8.1. Introduction: Gram-negative bacteria in brewing
      • 8.2. Acetic acid bacteria
      • 8.3. Zymomonas
      • 8.4. Brewery-related Enterobacteriaceae
      • 8.5. Conclusion
      • 8.6. Further reading
    • 9. Strictly anaerobic beer-spoilage bacteria
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. The types of strictly anaerobic beer-spoilage bacteria
      • 9.3. Occurrence in artificial and natural environments
      • 9.4. Appearance of cells and laboratory cultures
      • 9.5. General physiology and metabolism
      • 9.6. Growth and effects in beer
      • 9.7. Management of contaminations
      • 9.8. Future outlook and research needs
      • 9.9. Sources of further information and advice
  • Part Three. Reducing microbial spoilage: design and technology
    • 10. Hygienic design and Cleaning-In-Place (CIP) systems in breweries
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Brewery contamination
      • 10.3. The main principles of hygienic design as applied in the brewery
      • 10.4. An overview of CIP systems used in the brewery
      • 10.5. Conclusions
      • 10.6. Future trends
      • 10.7. Sources of further information and advice
    • 11. Reducing microbial spoilage of beer using filtration
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Filtration technologies in brewing
      • 11.3. Filter aid filtration
      • 11.4. Crossflow microfiltration
      • 11.5. Sterile filtration
      • 11.6. Improving filtration performance
      • 11.7. Future trends
      • 11.8. Sources of further information and advice
    • 12. Reducing microbial spoilage of beer using pasteurisation
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. History
      • 12.3. Principles of pasteurisation
      • 12.4. D value, z value, P value, process time, Pasteurisation Units and L value
      • 12.5. Spoilage hurdles
      • 12.6. Microorganism heat resistance
      • 12.7. Tunnel pasteurisation
      • 12.8. Flash pasteurisation
      • 12.9. Flavour change
      • 12.10. Good practice and quality control
      • 12.11. Future trends
      • 12.12. Sources of further information and advice
    • 13. Traditional methods of detection and identification of brewery spoilage organisms
      • 13.1. Detection of brewery spoilage organisms
      • 13.2. Identification of brewing spoilage organisms
      • 13.3. Summary
    • 14. Rapid detection and identification of spoilage bacteria in beer
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Hygiene tests (ATP bioluminescence, oxidoreductase)
      • 14.3. Direct epifluorescence filter technique
      • 14.4. Antibody-direct epifluorescent filter technique
      • 14.5. Oligonucleotide-direct epifluorescent filter technique
      • 14.6. In situ hybridization detection systems
      • 14.7. Polymerase chain reaction
      • 14.8. MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy
      • 14.9. Conclusions
    • 15. Beer packaging: microbiological hazards and considerations
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Microbiological hazards in the filling hall
      • 15.3. Biofilm growth in the packaging hall
      • 15.4. Minimization of risks
      • 15.5. Future trends
    • 16. Assuring the microbiological quality of draught beer
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Draught beer quality
      • 16.3. Microbiology of draught beer
      • 16.4. Managing the microbiological risk
      • 16.5. Innovation
  • Part Four. Impact of microbiology on sensory quality
    • 17. Impact of yeast and bacteria on beer appearance and flavour
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Impact of yeast on beer appearance
      • 17.3. Impact of yeast on beer flavour
      • 17.4. Impact of bacteria on beer appearance and flavour
      • 17.5. Future trends
      • 17.6. Further information
    • 18. Sensory analysis as a tool for beer quality assessment with an emphasis on its use for microbial control in the brewery
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Part 1: microbes, flavors, off-flavors, and taints in brewing
      • 18.3. The microbiology of “atypical flavor” production in brewing—an overview
      • 18.4. Specialty beer production and processes
      • 18.5. Conclusion—part 1
      • 18.6. Part 2: sensory evaluation
      • 18.7. Gathering data for sensory evaluation
      • 18.8. Sensory training
      • 18.9. Conclusion—part 2
  • Part Five. Valorisation of microbiological brewing waste
    • 19. Anaerobic treatment of brewery wastes
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Key factors affecting the anaerobic digestion process
      • 19.3. Factors affecting the application of anaerobic digestion in waste treatment
      • 19.4. Anaerobic treatment of brewery wastes
      • 19.5. Conclusion and perspectives
    • 20. Water treatment and reuse in breweries
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Production and composition of brewery wastewater
      • 20.3. Pretreatment of brewery wastewater
      • 20.4. Advanced treatment of brewery wastewater
      • 20.5. Challenges and future prospects
      • 20.6. Conclusions
  • Index

Description

Brewing Microbiology discusses the microbes that are essential to successful beer production and processing, and the ways they can pose hazards in terms of spoilage and sensory quality.

The text examines the properties and management of these microorganisms in brewing, along with tactics for reducing spoilage and optimizing beer quality. It opens with an introduction to beer microbiology, covering yeast properties and management, and then delves into a review of spoilage bacteria and other contaminants and tactics to reduce microbial spoilage.

Final sections explore the impact of microbiology on the sensory quality of beer and the safe management and valorisation of brewing waste.

Key Features

  • Examines key developments in brewing microbiology, discussing the microbes that are essential for successful beer production and processing
  • Covers spoilage bacteria, yeasts, sensory quality, and microbiological waste management
  • Focuses on developments in industry and academia, bringing together leading experts in the field

Readership

Microbiologists in the food and beverage industries, specifically the brewing industry, technical personnel in brewing organisations and academics with a research interest in the field


Details

No. of pages:
506
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782423492
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782423317

About the Editors

Annie Hill Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor at the International Centre for Brewing & Distilling, Heriot-Watt University, UK