Borish's Clinical Refraction

2nd Edition

Authors: William Benjamin
Hardcover ISBN: 9780750675246
eBook ISBN: 9780702038976
Imprint: Butterworth-Heinemann
Published Date: 21st June 2006
Page Count: 1712

Description

Now updated and expanded to cover the latest technologies, this full-color text on clinical refraction uses an easy-to-read format to give optometry students and practitioners all the important information they need. Also covers a wide range of other aspects of the eye exam, including anterior and posterior segment evaluations, contact lens, ocular pharmacology, and visual field analysis. Four new chapters cover wavefront-guided refraction, optical correction with refractive surgeries, prosthetic devices, and patients with ocular pathology.

Key Features

  • Offer precise, step-by-step how-to's for performing all of the most effective refractive techniques.
  • Presents individualized refractive approaches for the full range of patients, including special patient populations.
  • Contriubtors are internationally recognized, leading authorities in the field.

Table of Contents

SECTION I: PRINCIPLES

1. Refractive Status of the Eye

2. Incidence and Distribution of Refractive Anomalies

3. Development of the Ametropias

4. Accommodation, the Pupil, and Presbyopia

5. Fusion and Binocularity

SECTION II: ADJUNCT EXAMINATIONS

6. The Ophthalmic Case Historian

7. Visual Acuity

8. Contrast Sensitivity and Glare Testing

9. Color Vision

10. Ocular Motility

11. The Physical Examination

12. Pharmacology and Refraction

13. Anterior Segment Evaluation

14. Posterior Segment Evaluation

15. Visual Field Screening and Analysis

16. Clinical Electrophysiology

SECTION III: THE REFRACTION

17. Corneal Topography

18. Objective Refraction: Retinoscopy, Autorefraction and Photorefraction

19. Wavefront-Guided Refraction

20. Monocular and Binocular

21. Phorometry and Stereopsis

SECTION IV: ANALYSIS AND PRESCRIPTION OF OPTICAL CORRECTIONS

22. Analysis, Interpretation, and Prescription for the Ametropias and Heterophorias

23. Correction with Single Vision

24. Correction with Multifocal Spectacle Lenses

25. Prescription of Absorptive Lenses

26. Applied Optics of Contact Lens Correction

27. Clinical Optics of Contact Lens Prescription

28. Correction of Presbyopia with Contact Lenses

29. Optical Correction with Refractive Surgeries and Prosthetic Devices

SECTION V: SPECIAL CONDITIONS

30. Infants, Toddlers, and Children

31. Patients with Amblyopia and Strabismus

32. Patients with Anisometropia and Aniseikonia

33. Patients with High Refractive Error

34. Patients with Irregular Corneal Astigmatism

35. The Elderly

36. Patients with Low Vision

37. Patients with Ocular Pathology

Details

No. of pages:
1712
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Butterworth-Heinemann 2007
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
eBook ISBN:
9780702038976
Hardcover ISBN:
9780750675246

About the Author

William Benjamin

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Optometry and Physiological Optics, Director of Clinical Research and Senior Scientist, Vision Science Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Optometry, Birmingham, AL

Reviews

BOOK REVIEW
William J. Benjamin, Editor, Irvin M. Borish, Consultant;
Borish’s Clinical Refraction, second edition
Butterworth-Heinemann -Elsevier, 2006; hardbound, 1694pp, US$195, ISBN-13:
978–0–7506–7524–6
Barry Masters
Received: 1 April 2008 / Accepted: 2 April 2008
# Springer-Verlag 2008
Visual acuity is taken for granted until it changes, and then
it adversely affects our ability to function. It is a supreme
tribute to the clinical skills and the plethora of optoelectronic
instruments that are available to optometrists and
ophthalmologists that they can determine the altered
refraction that is required to restore normal visual acuity.
Before the era of photorefractive surgery, before the era of
contact lenses, there were glasses (that is, two pieces of
glass that are polished in such a manner to achieve the
required alteration in the light paths by the process of
refraction), and they are mounted in a frame to be worn on
the bridge of the nose and the ears and thus remain
stationary with respect to the visual axes of the eyes. With
eyeglasses, as compared to hand-held single lens magnifiers
that were used for reading, the hands are free and the
glasses remain stationary with respect to movements of the
head and the body. In the history of inventions, eyeglasses
provide an example of a simple idea that when properly
implemented provides individuals with a great improvement
in their quality of life. What is the origin of high
quality spectacles?
In a thoroughly researched and beautifully illustrated
new book, Renaissance Vision from Spectacles to Telescopes
(Philadelphia, American Philosophical Society,
2007) Vincent Ilardi provides new evidence that 15th
century Florence was the center for the production of high
quality spectacles. While Venice during the same period
also produced eyeglasses, the emphasis was on items such
as mirrors, vess