Bioremediation and Bioeconomy - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128028308, 9780128028728

Bioremediation and Bioeconomy

1st Edition

Editors: M.N.V Prasad
eBook ISBN: 9780128028728
Paperback ISBN: 9780128028308
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 26th October 2015
Page Count: 730
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Description

Bioremediation and Bioeconomy provides a common platform for scientists from various backgrounds to find sustainable solutions to environmental issues, including the ever-growing lack of water resources which are under immense pressure due to land degradation, pollution, population explosion, urbanization, and global economic development.

In addition, large amounts of toxic waste have been dispersed in thousands of contaminated sites and bioremediation is emerging as an invaluable tool for environmental clean-up.

The book addresses these challenge by presenting innovative and cost-effective solutions to decontaminate polluted environments, including usage of contaminated land and waste water for bioproducts such as natural fibers, biocomposites, and fuels to boost the economy.

Users will find a guide that helps scientists from various backgrounds find sustainable solutions to these environmental issues as they address the topical issues crucial for understanding new and innovative approaches for sustainable development.

Key Features

  • Provides a compilation of new information on phytoremediation not found in other books in the present market
  • The first book to link phytoremediation and the bioeconomy
  • Includes strategies to utilize contaminated soils for producing bioresources and co-generation of value chain and value additions products

Readership

Environmental scientist, environmental engineers, chemists, agricultural scientists

Table of Contents

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  • Dedication
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Section 1: Bioproducts from Contaminated Substrates (Soil and Water)
    • Chapter 1: Production of Biodiesel Feedstock from the Trace Element Contaminated Lands in Ukraine
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Monitoring of Heavy Metals Pollution in Ukraine
      • 3 Economical Background of Biodiesel Production in Ukraine and in the World
      • 4 Biodiesel Produced from Oilseed Crops
      • 5 Cleanup of Heavy Metals from Soil by Using Oilseed Crops
      • 6 Conclusions
    • Chapter 2: Energy Plantations, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants on Contaminated Soil
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Aromatic, Medicinal, and Energy Plants
      • 3 Vetiver and Lemon grass
      • 4 Phytostabilization of Integrated Sponge Iron Plant Waste Dumps by Aromatic Grass-Legume (Lemon-Stylo) Mixture and Energy Plantation (Sesbania)
      • 5 Phytoremediation of Chromite-Asbestos Mine Waste Using Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides: A Pot Scale Study
      • 6 Phytostabilization of Copper Tailings Using Cymbopogon citratus and Vetiveria zizanioides: A Pot Scale Study
    • Chapter 3: Prosopis juliflora (Sw) DC: Potential for Bioremediation and Bioeconomy
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 About Prosopis juliflora
      • 3 Global Distribution
      • 4 Restoration of Contaminated/Degraded Land, Phytoremediation
      • 5 Prosopis as Livestock Feed
      • 6 Prosopis for Fuelwood
      • 7 Prosopis for Production of Timber
      • 8 Prosopis for Bioethanol
      • 9 Prosopis for Honey Production
      • 10 Medicinal Uses
      • 11 Natural Persticide (Allelopathy)
      • 12 Prosopis Pods and Seeds Are a Rich Source of Carbohydrate
      • 13 Eecosystem Services: Birds Breeding on Prosopis
    • Chapter 4: Giant Reed (Arundo donax L.): A Multipurpose Crop Bridging Phytoremediation with Sustainable Bioeconomy
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Giant Reed (A. donax L.)
      • 3 Production of Giant Reed Irrigated with Wastewaters: Case Studies
      • 4 Production of Giant Reed in Contaminated Soils: Case Studies
      • 5 Benefits and Constraints of Using Giant Reed for Phytoremediation Purposes
      • 6 Conclusions and Recommendations
  • Section 2: Biomass Energy, Biodiesel, and Biofuel from Contaminated Substrates
    • Chapter 5: Biomass Energy from Revegetation of Landfill Sites
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Phytocapping Technology to Manage Landfill Sites
      • 3 Landfill Biomass for Energy Production
      • 4 Technologies for Biomass Conversion to Energy
      • 5 Summary and Conclusion
    • Chapter 6: Bioenergy from Phytoremediated Phytomass of Aquatic Plants via Gasification
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Aquatic Weeds for Decontamination of Water
      • 3 Biogas Generation from Phytoremediated Biomass of Water Weeds
      • 4 Mechanism of Biogas Generation
      • 5 Cleaning and Upgrading Biogas
      • 6 Factors Influencing Biogas Yield
      • 7 Bioeconomy of Biogas Production
      • 8 Constraints in Biogas Generation from Phytoremediating Aquatic Macrophytes
      • 9 Conclusions
    • Chapter 7: Jatropha Curcas L. Cultivation on Constrained Land: Exploring the Potential for Economic Growth and Environmental Protection
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Cultivation and Economic Growth - Value Additions and Value Chain Products
    • Chapter 8: Potential of Castor Bean (Ricinus Communis L.) for Phytoremediation of Metalliferous Waste Assisted by Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria: Possible Cogeneration of Economic Products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Materials and Methods
      • 3 Characterization of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria
      • 4 Results and Discussion
      • 5 Growth and Phosphate Solubilization
      • 6 Uptake of Metal by Bacterial Strains
      • 7 Identification of Bacterial Strains
      • 8 Conclusion
  • Section 3: Ornamentals and Crops for Contaminated Substrates
    • Chapter 9: Potential of Ornamental Plants for Phytoremediation of Heavy Metals and Income Generation
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Contamination of Heavy Metals and Phytoremediation
      • 3 Ornamental Plants for Heavy Metals Phytoremediation
      • 4 Ornamental Plants for Phytoremediation, Sustainability, and Bioeconomy
      • 5 Management of Phytoremediating Ornamental Biomass
      • 6 Conclusions
    • Chapter 10: Tree Crops on Abandoned Mines for Environmental Remediation and Industrial Feedstock
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Trees: From Environmental Remediation to Industrial Feedstock
      • 3 Study Areas
      • 4 Methods
      • 5 Results and Discussion
      • 6 Conclusions
    • Chapter 11: Rice Paddies for Trace Element Cleanup: Bioeconomic Perspectives
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Rice Plant as a Phytoremediation Crop
      • 3 Assisted Cleanup Using Rice Plants
      • 4 Rice Industry By-Products for Bioremediation
      • 5 Sustainable Bioremediation Prospects of Rice Paddies
      • 6 Outlook
    • Chapter 12: Cultivation of Sweet Sorghum on Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soils by Phytoremediation Approach for Production of bioethanol
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Remediation Measures for HMs
      • 3 Phytoremediation of HMs: Hyperaccumulators
      • 4 Phytoremediation of HMs: Energy Crops
      • 5 Phytoremediation of HMs by Sugar Crops: Sweet Sorghum
      • 6 Sweet Sorghum: A Feedstock for “Sweet Fuel” Bioethanol
      • 7 Microbe-Assisted Phytoremediation
      • 8 Work at ICRISAT
      • 9 Work at Indian NARS
      • 10 Work in Other Countries
      • 11 Future Outlook
  • Section 4: Brownfield Development for Smart Bioeconomy
    • Chapter 13: Mulberry and Vetiver for Phytostabilization of Mine Overburden: Cogeneration of Economic Products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Environmental Issues Associated with Mine Overburdens
      • 3 Risks Associated with Coal Mining Overburden Pollution
      • 4 Coal Mine Overburdens
      • 5 Mulberry Cultivation on Coal Mine Overburden in India
      • 6 Phytostabilization of Mine Waste by Vetiver Grass
      • 7 Vetiver Ecotype and Propagation in Thailand
      • 8 Phytostabilization of Zinc Mine Waste by Vetiver Grass in Thailand
      • 9 Economic Products from Vetiver
      • 10 Conclusions
    • Chapter 14: Utilization of Contaminated Lands for Cultivation of Dye Producing Plants
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Historical Background
      • 3 Potential and Future Prospects of Dyeing Plants
      • 4 Sources of Natural Dyeing Plants
      • 5 Experimental Findings
      • 6 Conclusion
    • Chapter 15: Brownfield Restoration as a Smart Economic Growth Option for Promoting Ecotourism, biodiversity, and Leisure: Two Case Studies in Nord-Pas De Calais
      • 1 Introduction
      • Case Study 1: Ecological Interests, Restoration and Valuation of Coal Mining Slag Heaps
      • 2 General Description of Study Area
      • 3 Initiative by Établissement Public Foncier
      • 4 Slag Heaps: A Very Special Environment
      • 5 The Edaphic Break Effect
      • 6 The Climatic Break Effect
      • 7 The Topographic Break Effect
      • 8 A Combination of Effects
      • 9 The Agricultural Break Effect
      • 10 An In Situ Laboratory
      • 11 The Creation of Wetlands
      • 12 An Ambitious Program for the Regeneration of Nature and Its Accessibility to the Public
      • 13 Nature Protection
      • 14 Actions for Public Access and Leisure Areas
      • 15 Conclusion
      • Case Study 2: Environmental Protection and Management of Two Metalliferous Sites
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Historical Settings
      • 3 Fauna, Flora and Natural Habitats in Polluted Areas
      • 4 Where Does This Particular Flora Come From?
      • 5 Natura 2000 Preservation and Preservation State
      • 6 Protecting a Polluted Area!
      • 7 Scientific Monitoring
      • 8 Conclusion
    • Chapter 16: Biological Recultivation of Mine Industry Deserts: Facilitating the Formation of Phytocoenosis in the Middle Ural Region, Russia
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 The Purpose and Methods of Research
      • 3 Phytocoenosis Formation on Ash Dumps
      • 4 Conclusion
  • Section 5: Algal Bioproducts, Biofuels, Biorefinery for Business Opportunities
    • Chapter 17: Phycoremediation and Business Prospects
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Major Challenges in Algal Biomass Production
      • 3 Phycoremediation
      • 4 World’s First Phycoremediation Plant at Ranipet, India
      • 5 The Technology and Biomass Based Commercially Valuable Products
      • 6 Leather Processing Chemical Industry
      • 7 Effluent from Confectionery Industry
      • 8 Effluent Characteristics
      • 9 Algal Treatment
      • 10 Effluent from Soft Drink Manufacturing Industry
      • 11 Effluent from Textile Dyeing Industries
      • 12 Phycoremediation of Textile Dyeing Effluents
      • 13 Algal Biomass Production in Textile Dyeing Effluent
      • 14 Effluent from Oil Drilling Operations (Offshore and Onshore)
      • 15 Effluent from Detergent Manufacturing Industry
      • 16 Effluent from Electroplating Industry
      • 17 Sewage and Algal Biomass Production
      • 18 Effluent from a Chemical Industry which Produces Organic Acids
      • 19 Conclusions
    • Chapter 18: Algae-Based Bioremediation: Bioproducts and Biofuels for Biobusiness
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Microalgae for WWT and Xenobiotics Breakdown
      • 3 Heavy Metal Removal by Microalgae
      • 4 Microalgae-Mediated CO2 Mitigation and Flue Gas Treatment
      • 5 Integrated WWT and Algal Cultivation
      • 6 Value Addition to WWT: Algal Biomass Applications
      • 7 Conclusion
  • Section 6: Bioprocesses, Bioengineering for Boosting Bio-Based Economy
    • Chapter 19: Building a Bio-Based Economy Through Waste Remediation: Innovation Towards Sustainable Future
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Waste and Energy: A Partnership for a Sustainable Future
      • 3 Value Addition from Waste
      • 4 Bio-Based Economy
      • 5 Future Perspectives
    • Chapter 20: Energy from Wastewater Treatment
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Wastewater Treatment
      • 3 Biological Treatment Options
      • 4 Suspended Growth Processes
      • 5 Attached Growth Process
      • 6 Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Processes
      • 7 Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors
      • 8 Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactors
      • 9 Hybrid Anaerobic Reactor
      • 10 Activated Sludge Process
      • 11 Trickling Filter
      • 12 Downflow Hanging Sponge Reactor
      • 13 Hydrogen Production in Dark Fermentation
      • 14 Microbial Fuel Cells
    • Chapter 21: Bioprocesses for Waste and Wastewater Remediation for Sustainable Energy
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction to Energy Through Bioremediation
      • 2 Versatile Components of Bioenergy Generation Through Remediation
      • 3 Bioremediation Processes That Generate Energy
      • 4 Energy Generation Through Bioprocess Integrations
      • 5 Future Perspectives
  • Section 7: Case Studies
    • Chapter 22: Bioremediation in Brazil: Scope and Challenges to Boost Up the Bioeconomy
      • Abstract
      • 1 The Bioeconomy in Brazil
      • 2 The Use of Biomass for Environmental Remediation and the Bioeconomy
      • 3 Research on the Use of Biomass for Environmental Remediation in Brazil
      • 4 Regulatory Frameworks Associated with Bioeconomy in Brazil
      • 5 View of the Industrial Sector About Bioeconomy in Brazil
      • 6 Removal of Barriers to Boost Up the Use of Biomass for Bioremediation in Brazil
      • 7 Conclusions
    • Chapter 23: Phytoremediation of Soil and Groundwater: Economic Benefits Over Traditional Methodologies
      • Abstract
      • 1 Phytoremediation History
      • 2 Traditional Versus Designed and Constructed Systems
      • 3 Overcoming the Limitations of Phytoremediation
      • 4 Case Histories
    • Chapter 24: Phytomanagement of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metals-Contaminated Sites in Assam, North Eastern State of India, for Boosting Bioeconomy
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Oil Spills: Causes and Concerns
      • 3 Beneficial Plant-Microbe Interaction in Biodegradation
      • 4 Potential Microbes Boosting Bioeconomy in Rice and Tea
      • 5 Conclusion
  • Section 8: New Biology
    • Chapter 25: Ecocatalysis: A New Approach Toward Bioeconomy
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 A New Approach to Multisite and Multiscale Rehabilitation by Phytoextraction
      • 3 From Phytoextraction to Green Chemistry and Vice Versa Through Ecocatalysis
      • 4 Conclusion: Ecocatalysis, a New Vision of Green Chemistry
    • Chapter 26: Synthetic Biology: An Emerging Field for Developing Economies
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Emerging Trends in Biotechnology Industry and Applied Research
      • 3 Synthetic Biology for Handling Biowaste
      • 4 Advancing Bioremediation Through Systems Biology and Synthetic Biology
      • 5 Perspectives
      • 6 Risk Management of Synthetic Biology Applications
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
730
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780128028728
Paperback ISBN:
9780128028308

About the Editor

M.N.V Prasad

M.N.V. Prasad is a Professor in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Hyderabad. He has served the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change, Government of India in various advisory committees on biodiversity conservation, ecosystem services, pollution control and abatement, environmental information systems and bioremediation of contaminated sites. He is an active visiting scientist in several international universities. He is the editor, co-editor, or author of 15 books and 95 journal articles (with over 6277 journal citations and h-index 41 as per google scholar). He has made outstanding contributions to the fields of Bioremediation, Bioresources, Biomass energy sources, bioeconomy and to the broad field of environmental biotechnology (including value chain and value addition products from plants used in phytoremediation) and bioremediation are his main areas of expertise.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Hyderabad, India